Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenGL Being Tied to Proprietary Software Traps

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • VMware Plumbing OpenGL 4.x Support For The VMWGFX Graphics Stack

    VMware's VMWGFX open-source Linux graphics driver stack for interfacing with their virtualization software to offer guest VM 3D acceleration that is in turn handled by the host's drivers will soon be offering OpenGL 4.x support.

    It's been a while since last having any big news to share on the VMWGFX stack either for their Linux kernel DRM or Mesa Gallium3D code. But they've been busy working on all of the bits necessary to implement for being able to handle OpenGL 4.0 support.

    VMware's Roland Scheidegger on Friday sent out a patch series providing the necessary kernel-side bits for OpenGL 4 functionality with their Direct Rendering Manager driver. Various new commands and other capabilities were required for allowing their OpenGL driver to move beyond OpenGL 3.3.

  • Erik Faye-Lund: Introducing OpenCL™ and OpenGL® on DirectX [Ed: Microsoft has long leveraged DirectX to make it a "Windows world"]

    For the last few months, we have been working on two exciting new projects at Collabora, and it’s finally time to share some information about them with the world:

    We are partnering with Microsoft DirectX engineers to build OpenCL and OpenGL mapping layers, in order to bring OpenCL 1.2 and OpenGL 3.3 support to all Windows and DirectX 12 enabled devices out there!

    This work builds on a lot of previous work. First and foremost, we are building this by using Mesa 3D, with the Gallium interface as the base for the OpenGL layer, and NIR as the base for the OpenCL compiler. We are also using LLVM and the SPIRV-LLVM-Translator from Khronos as the compiler front-end.

  • Collabora partnered with Microsoft to get OpenGL and OpenCL on DirectX

    A very interesting use of open source in action here from the incredibly smart team over at Collabora who teamed up with Microsoft engineers to get OpenGL and OpenCL via DirectX.

    Why is this interesting? Well, they're doing it by using the open source Mesa drivers. It's pretty darn clever, and shows just how far translation layers are being used industry-wide. Once this is all implemented, it means that any device that supports DirectX 12 would also work with (and actually be compliant) with OpenGL 3.3 and OpenCL 1.2.

  • Microsoft + Collabora Working To Map OpenGL/OpenCL Over DirectX 12

    Microsoft and Collabora are today announcing a partnership for building OpenCL and OpenGL mapping layers over DirectX (D3D12).

    The focus is on providing OpenCL 1.2 and OpenGL 3.3 support for all Windows builds on DirectX 12 enabled devices.

Microsoft pays Linux-centric companies to help Windows

Collabora helps the openwashing of DirectX, which is proprietary

  • Collabora working on making any DirectX 12 driver able to support open graphics and parallel programming APIs

    DirectX is Microsoft's proprietary hardware-accelerated graphics API for Windows; OpenGL is a cross-platform graphics API; and OpenCL is a cross-platform framework for parallel programming on CPUs and GPUs. Although there are Windows OpenCL and OpenGL drivers for many GPUs, the extent of support varies, and the DirectX implementation may be better optimised. The mapping layers will be delivered as enhancements to the open-source Mesa 3D project, for which Microsoft will provide a new DirectX 3D 12 (D3D12) backend.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Five best open source Backup utilities for Linux

Data loss is a common threat we all face these days. Disk failure or other user mistakes might result in data loss. Losing data is more hazardous for a data center which stores tons of information every day. There are so many backup Utilities available in the market which makes it confusing to choose the best one among the numerous options. This article will help you select the most appropriate free backup utility for Linux that might fit your needs. Read more

Android Leftovers

All about Kubernetes

Kubernetes is an enterprise-grade container-orchestration system designed from the start to be cloud-native. It has grown to be the de-facto cloud container platform, continuing to expand as it has embraced new technologies, including container-native virtualization and serverless computing. Kubernetes manages containers and more, from micro-scale at the edge to massive scale, in both public and private cloud environments. It is a perfect choice for a "private cloud at home" project, providing both robust container orchestration and the opportunity to learn about a technology in such demand and so thoroughly integrated into the cloud that its name is practically synonymous with "cloud computing." Read more Also: Provision Kubernetes NFS clients on a Raspberry Pi homelab A beginner's guide to Kubernetes container orchestration