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Linux Mint 20 Release Date & Features

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Linux

Well, that’s what this post is here to tell you. We will keep this roundup of Linux Mint 20 features and updates up-to-date as development happens until June, its expected release month.

What do we about Linux Mint 20 so far?

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Also: Linux Mint 20 Doing Away With 32-Bit Support

Linux Mint 20 Codenamed “Ulyana,” Will Be Based on Ubuntu 20.04

  • Linux Mint 20 Codenamed “Ulyana,” Will Be Based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    Announced earlier this year along with the LMDE 4 release, the Linux Mint 20 operating system will be released sometime this summer and will be based on the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system, due for release on April 23rd, 2020.

    The Linux Mint project continues the tradition of naming new Linux Mint releases alphabetically, and they revealed today in their monthly newsletter that Linux Mint 20 will be dubbed as “Ulyana.”

    Besides revealing the codename, the team also confirmed the fact that Linux Mint 20 will ship with the same three flavors we’re used until now, namely Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce, as well as the fact that it’ll be a 64-bit only release.

Linux Mint 20 Codename “Ulyana”! What’s News in Linux Mint 20?

  • Linux Mint 20 Codename “Ulyana”! What’s News in Linux Mint 20?

    Linux Mint 20: The team developers announced that the latest version of Linux Mint 20 going to be released a few months. Linux Mint 20 is officially code-named as “Ulyana“. Linux Mint 20 is developed based on the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS version. The team also said that the Linux Mint 20 will have many new software tweaks and hardware boost!

Linux Mint 20 is 64-bit only, based on Ubuntu 20.04

  • Linux Mint 20 is 64-bit only, based on Ubuntu 20.04, and named 'Ulyana'

    Linux Mint is great operating system. It is based on the excellent Ubuntu and features three great desktop environment options -- Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce. While it is a smart choice for Linux beginners, it is also good for experts too.

    Today, we learn some new details about the upcoming Linux Mint 20. While most of the newly revealed information is positive, there is one thing that is sure to upset many Linux Mint users.

More in the original post

  • Monthly News – March 2020

    Many thanks to all of you for your support and for your donations. LMDE 4 took longer than we anticipated but we managed to add many new features into it and significantly close the gap with the Ubuntu release. Now that it’s released we’re focusing on the new development cycle and the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 package base.

    LMDE 3 EOL

    LMDE 3 will reach EOL (End-Of-Life) on July 1st 2020. Past that date the repositories will continue to work but the release will no longer receive bug fixes and security updates from Linux Mint.

    To upgrade LMDE 3 to LMDE 4 read “How to upgrade to LMDE 4“.

    Mint 20, codename Ulyana

    The codename for Linux Mint 20 is Ulyana.

    Linux Mint 20 will be based on Ubuntu 20.04 and feature 3 editions: Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce.

    Unlike previous releases, it will only be available in 64-bit.

Linux Mint 20 Ulyana ISOs will only be available in 64-bit

  • Linux Mint 20 Ulyana ISOs will only be available in 64-bit

    Clem Lefebvre, head of the Linux Mint project, has announced that Linux Mint 20 will carry the codename Ulyana and that 32-bit ISOs will be dropped. This will see some aging computers lose support. While the 32-bit ISO will be dropped, 32-bit packages, where necessary, will still be available to those with a 64-bit install.

    If you still need a 32-bit Linux Mint ISO, you’ll either have to stay with Linux Mint 19.3 until it loses support in 2023, or you can switch to the newly released LMDE 4 which will receive the latest Linux Mint software such as Cinnamon. The decision to drop 32-bit ISOs in Linux Mint 20 was first revealed last summer when Canonical decided to remove support from Ubuntu 19.10. As Linux Mint uses Ubuntu as a base, it makes sense for Linux Mint 20 to follow suit in dropping support.

The Next Linux Mint Version Will Be Called Ulyana

  • The Next Linux Mint Version Will Be Called Ulyana, Launch Only in 64-Bit

    But the biggest change, however, is the migration to 64-bit exclusively, as beginning with this new release, Linux Mint officially drops 32-bit versions.

    Going forward, Linux Mint will continue to be available in 64-bit only.

    The new Linux Mint 20 will be based on Ubuntu 20.04, the team also revealed, and will land in three different versions, namely Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce.

    Additionally, there is also important news for those currently running the latest version. LMDE will officially reach the end of support in July, which means that after this date, devices not yet upgraded to version 4 will no longer receive updates – of course, these systems will continue to run normally, but the lack of security updates and bug fixes make them more prone to issues and cyberattacks.

Linux Mint 20 Codenamed Ulyana & More

  • Linux Mint 20 Codenamed Ulyana & More

    The news came on the last day of the month from Linux Mint. The new version of Linux Mint which is Linux Mint 20 will be called Ulyana. Linux Mint release post has not released anything other than the name. But a simple google search shows the word “Ulyana” comes from the Russian origin and it means Youthful. Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” will be based on the upcoming Ubuntu release, 20.04 “Focal Fossa”. Focal Fossa is scheduled to be released on 23rd of this month.

Fossbytes coverage

  • Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana”: All New Features And Release Date

    Linux Mint is undoubtedly one of the best beginner-friendly and tough competitors of the most famous Ubuntu Linux. One of the reasons can be credited to its upstream codebase. Since Linux Mint is an Ubuntu-based distro, it uses the codebase of the latest Ubuntu long term support version.

    After ending 2019 with the release of Linux Mint 19.3, the Linux Mint team is ready to roll out its first version in 2020. As already revealed in their monthly blog, the upcoming Linux Mint 20 will be based on the next Ubuntu 20.4 LTS. So, in this article, I’m going to discuss everything about the new changes and release date of Mint 20.

Linux Mint 20: New features, Release date, and more

  • Linux Mint 20: New features, Release date, and more

    Unlike the previous releases, Linux Mint 20 will only be available for 64-bit machines. The current long-term support (LTS) release Linux Mint 19.3 ‘Tricia’ was released in December 2019.

    For the uninitiated, LTS releases get support for a more extended period than the short-term versions. Linux Mint follows Ubuntu’s footsteps when it comes to supporting the LTS editions that will get five years of support and are considered as enterprise-grade releases. Linux Mint 19 will continue getting support until 2023, and the Linux Mint 20 will be supported until 2025.

    Codename ‘Ulyana’

    Ever since the very first version of Linux Mint codenamed ‘Ada’ was released back in 2006, all new versions belonging to a new series (such as 18.x or 9.x) are given feminine code names that start with the next letter of the alphabet. Every name except ‘Sarah’ for Linux Mint 18 ends with the letter ‘a’, making the names sound pleasant to the ears.

    For instance, the last 4 LTS releases of Linux Mint 19 based on Ubuntu 18.04 have been named with nicknames starting with the letter ‘T’ – Tara, Tessa, Tina, and Tricia. Naturally, it follows that the next 4 LTS releases of Linux Mint 20 will have names that start with the letter ‘U’.

Linux Mint votes no on Snap packages, APT to block snapd...

  • Linux Mint votes no on Snap packages, APT to block snapd installs

    The Linux Mint distribution team put out another of their monthly updates, and this month was quite interesting.

    In the past the Linux Mint team had been quite vocal about Snaps, the next-generation Linux packaging system backed by Ubuntu maker Canonical. Like Flatpak, they're trying to redefine how Linux users install packages. The main issue here it seems, is that Snaps are more locked-down and it pushes Ubuntu directly.

    Mint's founder Clément Lefèbvre has said that with Linux Mint 20, they will push back firmly against Snaps. Currently in Ubuntu, which Mint builds off, Chromium is an empty package which installs a Snap (info) so the Mint team will ensure it tells you why and how to go and get Chromium yourself. Additionally, by default APT on Mint will not let snapd get installed but you will be able to do so manually.

    NVIDIA users rejoice! NVIDIA Optimus is to get better Mint support, with their included applet being able to show your GPU and select what card to use from the menu.

Snapping at Canonical's Snap

  • Snapping at Canonical's Snap: Linux Mint team says no to Ubuntu store 'backdoor'

    The developers of Linux Mint have expressed concern with Canonical's Snap Store and the way it is forced on Ubuntu users who try to install popular packages like the Chromium web browser.

    Linux Mint has editions based on either Ubuntu or Debian, so Canonical's decisions have a direct impact on the open-source operating system. Linux Mint 20, expected this month, is based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

    The Snap store is an alternative to traditional deb packages for installing applications, and one which Canonical promotes as superior. The approach is different, using container technology, and you can find a full technical explanation here.

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