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Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert Partly Liberated Under GPLv3

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Gaming
  • Remaster Update and Open Source / Mod Support

    Fellow Command & Conquer fans,

    Since the announcement of the Remastered Collection, one of the top questions from the community has been if the game would provide Mod Support. Given the incredible C&C community projects over the past two decades, we appreciated how important this was going to be for the Remastered Collection. It’s time to finally answer the question around Mod Support, but it first requires the reveal of a special surprise for the community.

    Today we are proud to announce that alongside the launch of the Remastered Collection, Electronic Arts will be releasing the TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code under the GPL version 3.0 license. This is a key moment for Electronic Arts, the C&C community, and the gaming industry, as we believe this will be one of the first major RTS franchises to open source their source code under the GPL. It’s worth noting this initiative is the direct result of a collaboration between some of the community council members and our teams at EA. After discussing with the council members, we made the decision to go with the GPL license to ensure compatibility with projects like CnCNet and Open RA. Our goal was to deliver the source code in a way that would be truly beneficial for the community, and we hope this will enable amazing community projects for years to come.

  • Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert will be partially open-sourced alongside remaster launch

    Today, EA gave another update regarding the upcoming Command & Conquer Remastered Collection, specifically about modding support for the two games in it, Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert. Surprisingly, it was revealed today that EA will be open-sourcing some key parts of the game.

    The open-sourced material, "TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code," will be under the GPL version 3.0 license, and will be released into the wild alongside the Remastered Collection's launch on June 5. Regarding this move, EA producer Jim Vessella said that "this is a key moment for Electronic Arts, the C&C community, and the gaming industry, as we believe this will be one of the first major RTS franchises to open source their source code under the GPL."

  • EA to open source part of Tiberian Dawn, Red Alert

    With the Command & Conquer Remastered Collection releasing next month for Windows, EA had a bit of an announcement to make today in regards to open source.

    Posting on Reddit as well as the Steam page, EA announced that both Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert will see their data being opened up. They will release "TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code under the GPL version 3.0 license". This is being done, they say, as a result of a collaboration between them and the community and they went with the GPL to "ensure compatibility with projects like CnCNet and Open RA".

  • EA To Open-Source Part Of Tiberian Dawn, Red Alert To Help The Mod Community

    Adding to the amount of surprising news this week, Electronic Arts just announced they will be open-sourcing portions of Command and Conquer Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert in order to help the mod community around this franchise.

    EA is to open-source TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll under the GPLv3 license. EA isn't providing the games as full open-source nor their assets but in this limited step they are aiming to help in allowing the community to create new maps, units, enhance the gameplay logic, and make other engine-level modifications.

EA is releasing the Command & Conquer source code...

  • EA is releasing the Command & Conquer source code so you can have better mods

    The devs behind Command & Conquer Remastered have been saying all the right things heading into release, but the latest announcement almost seems too good to be true – they’re releasing the source code. That means modders are going to have much better access to see how the original games were built – which, in turn, means we can get bigger, better Command & Conquer Remastered mods.

    “Today we are proud to announce that alongside the launch of the Remastered Collection, Electronic Arts will be releasing the TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code under the GPL version 3.0 license,” EA’s Jim Vessella explains on Reddit. “This is a key moment for Electronic Arts, the C&C community, and the gaming industry, as we believe this will be one of the first major RTS franchises to open source their source code under the GPL.”

A to Open Source PC Game Command & Conquer

  • EA to Open Source PC Game Command & Conquer, Enabling You to Create Crazy Mods

    Electronic Arts announced the news as the company prepares to release the 4K remaster to Command & Conquer: Tiberian Dawn and Command & Conquer: Red Alert on June 5th.

    In a Reddit post on Wednesday, EA producer Jim Vessella said the company has been receiving questions over whether the remaster will support gamer-made modifications. In response, EA has decided to open source the gaming code to both Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert.

The Command & Conquer source code is going public

  • The Command & Conquer source code is going public

    EA has announced that the source code for Command & Conquer: Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert will be released alongside the Remastered Collection next month. That's in addition to the new map editor included with the remaster, so expect bigger and better Command & Conquer mods in the near future.

    "Today we are proud to announce that alongside the launch of the Remastered Collection, Electronic Arts will be releasing the TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code under the GPL version 3.0 license. This is a key moment for Electronic Arts, the C&C community, and the gaming industry, as we believe this will be one of the first major RTS franchises to open source their source code under the GPL," reads the announcement from EA.

    With the Command & Conquer source code out in the open, modders will undoubtedly have a field day making dramatic changes to the games' maps, art style, and gameplay. Producer Jim Vessella gave us an example of just one way the DLL files can be used to engineer custom Command & Conquer experiences. Behold up above the Nuke Tank, which is what Remastered devs imagined would happen if Nods came across a Mammoth Tank.

Command & Conquer Remastered Collection's source code released

  • Command & Conquer Remastered Collection's source code released in mod support update

    Modding has long been a part of the fun in the classic Command & Conquer community, and Electronic Arts and Petroglyph know it. With that in mind, players with interest in modding the Command & Conquer Remastered Collection got a major treat today as Electronic Arts announced it would be releasing the source code for both Red Alert and Tiberian Dawn.

    Electronic Arts announced the release of the Command & Conquer Remastered Collection source code in a Command & Conquer Reddit post on May 20, 2020. EA Producer Jim Vassella took to the reddit to speak directly to the update regarding mod support.

    “Today we are proud to announce that alongside the launch of the Remastered Collection, Electronic Arts will be releasing the TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code under the GPL version 3.0 license,” Vassella wrote. “It’s worth noting this initiative is the direct result of a collaboration between some of the community council members and our teams at EA. After discussing with the council members, we made the decision to go with the GPL license to ensure compatibility with projects like CnCNet and Open RA.”

EA is releasing the source code for two classic...

  • EA is releasing the source code for two classic Command and Conquer games

    EA plans to release the source code for its classic real-time strategy games Command and Conquer: Tiberian Dawn and Command and Conquer: Red Alert, the studio announced today. The source code for the two games is scheduled to be available alongside the release of Command and Conquer Remastered Collection, which includes remastered versions of both titles and their expansions, on June 5th.

    By open sourcing the games, players should be able to use the assets to create mods that could, in theory, be quite extensive. “These open source DLLs should assist users to design maps, create custom units, replace art, alter gameplay logic, and edit data,” said EA’s Jim Vessella, producer on Command and Conquer Remastered, in a blog post. The open sourced assets can also be used in tandem with a new map editor that’s part of the collection, he added.

Good News! EA To Open Source Command and Conquer’s Tiberian Dawn

  • Good News! EA To Open Source Command and Conquer’s Tiberian Dawn & Red Alert

    Command and conquer is probably one of the biggest active classic RTS (Real-Time Strategy) game franchise out there.

    And, EA recently announced that they will be making two of the popular titles of the franchise (Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert) open source.

    And, this is coming from EA that we’ve held responsible for banning Linux gamers earlier this year. So, this is quite a surprise!

    I wasn’t even on earth when this game started a revolution of RTS games — so it makes sense that many gamers have nostalgic experiences with the game.

Coverage at "PC Gamer"

  • Command & Conquer Remastered source code will be released to support modding

    Command & Conquered Remastered Collection is only a couple of weeks away, and EA has finally revealed that it will have mod support—a subject it and developer Petroglyph had skirted before—at launch. It's going one step further, too, by giving players access to the source code.

    Producer Jim Vessella announced that the TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their source code will be available to root around in and tinker with under the GNU General Public License 3.0. Giving modders this much access hopefully means we'll see some pretty wild projects. A map editor will also be available, so you'll also be able to create new battlefields for your custom units and tweaked gameplay. I'm envisioning some big overhauls in our future.

    To get the ball rolling, Petroglyph has created a Brotherhood of Nod version of the Mammoth Tank, which it's stuck a nuke-launching cannon onto. You should be able to take it for a spin at launch. You'll be able to download maps and mods from the Steam Workshop or, if you're using Origin, just grab them from the in-game menu.

EA releasing Command & Conquer, Red Alert source code to help..

  • EA releasing Command & Conquer, Red Alert source code to help modders

    Why is June 5 so important? It's because it's the day EA will be launching Command & Conquer Remastered Collection. But EA making good with the modding community before the day the C&C Remaster comes out is glorious news. Jim Vessella, the Producer on the C&C Remaster at EA took to Reddit, where he said:

    "This is a key moment for Electronic Arts, the C&C community, and the gaming industry, as we believe this will be one of the first major RTS franchises to open source their source code under the GPL. Along with the inclusion of a new Map Editor, these open-source DLLs should assist users to design maps, create custom units, replace art, alter gameplay logic, and edit data".

    Vessella continued: "Overall, we are incredibly excited to see what the community creates over the coming months. We anticipate some fantastic content for the Remastered Collection itself, some great updates in current community projects as they incorporate the source code, and perhaps we'll even see some new RTS projects now made possible with the source code under the GPL".

Electronic Arts to Release Source Code of Highly Successful...

  • Electronic Arts to Release Source Code of Highly Successful Game

    Electronic Arts announced a surprise move this week. In something of an unprecedented move, EA will release the source code behind two massively popular games. Even if you haven’t played it, chances are, you’ve heard of Command & Conquer. The company will release the source code for two of its installment, Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert. Users who own the Remastered Collection of Command & Conquer will be able to dabble in designing maps, creating custom units, altering gameplay logic, etc. with the source code.

Command and Conquer Remastered finally moddable

  • Command and Conquer Remastered finally moddable

    EA announced that the upcoming remastered collection will have mod support at launch. This was actually dodged around by game developer Petroglyph until the publisher spilled the beans. Releasing the source code is the best way to make mods for the game.

    Game producer Jim Vessela was the one to announce that the TiberianDawn.dll, and RedAltert.dll and their source code will be available under the GNU General Public License 3.0. A map editor will be available as well.

Command and Conquer Remasters are Getting Source Code...

  • Command and Conquer Remasters are Getting Source Code Released as Well

    Electronic Arts and Petroglyph Studios have been working and are now weeks away from releasing the remaster of Command and Conquer: Tiberian Sun, and Red Alert in the Remaster Collection. One question that Petroglyph Studios has avoided answering up to now is if Command & Conquer Remastered Collection will support mods at launch. Producer Jim Vessella finally gave an answer on Reddit.

    Electronic Arts and Petroglyph Studios will be supporting mods for Command & Conquer Remastered Collection at launch and they are taking a step further as they are releasing the source codes for both games to facilitate an easier time building mods. TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code will be available under the GNU General Public License version 3.0 license.

'​Command & Conquer' Source Code To Be Released By EA

  • '​Command & Conquer' Source Code To Be Released By EA

    Electronic Arts has confirmed plans to release the source code for two instalments of its classic real-time strategy (RTS) series, Command & Conquer: Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert.

    "We are proud to announce that alongside the launch of the Remastered Collection, Electronic Arts will be releasing the TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code under the GPL version 3.0 license," said creative director, Jim Vessella.

    By releasing these open-source DLLs, the C&C team hopes that - along with a new map editor - the fan community can "design maps, create custom units, replace art, alter gameplay logic, and edit data" in order to create mods and "fun experiments" by tinkering with the code.

    [...]

    EA and Westwood Studios recently confirmed the release date for its long-awaited Command & Conquer remaster - 5th June, 2020. The snappily titled Command & Conquer Remastered Collection is bringing back the fan-favourite real-time strategy series for Windows PC via Steam and Origin.

EA open sources C&C Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert

  • EA open sources C&C Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert

    We have been watching the development of the Command & Conquer Remastered Collection quite closely and there has been some big news for the hallowed RTS franchise this week. In a blog post EA's Jim Vessella, producer on Command and Conquer Remastered, announced that mod support is coming to the 4K remasters. Additionally, Vasella shared that EA will be open sourcing the C&C Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert code under the GPL version 3.0 license.

    "Along with the inclusion of a new Map Editor, these open-source DLLs should assist users to design maps, create custom units, replace art, alter gameplay logic, and edit data," wrote Vasella. To demonstrate the possibilities this provides to would-be developers, Petroglyph created a new modded unit to play with - the Nuke Tank - an imagined Brotherhood of Nod captured and modified Mammoth Tank (see image below).

EA Goes Open-Source with Command & Conquer Remastered Collection

  • EA Goes Open-Source with Command & Conquer Remastered Collection

    Today, Command & Conquer Remastered Collection lead producer Jim Vessella posted a community update outlining the game’s commitment to the modding scene.

    EA will be releasing the TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll – some dynamic libraries for developers to work with – and their corresponding source code under the GPL version 3.0 license. This license allows EA to let others view and use the source, but still have ownership.

    This makes Command & Conquer one of the first major RTS franchises to provide their source code to users in this fashion, allowing aspiring modders opportunities to build custom maps, units, art and gameplay logic into the classic Command & Conquer experience. Incredible!

EA to Release 2 Command & Conquer Games' Source Code

  • EA to Release 2 Command & Conquer Games' Source Code to Help Modders

    EA has announced that it's releasing the source code for Command & Conquer: Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert in an effort to support the series' modding community ahead of the launch of Command & Conquer Remastered.

    Announced in a blog post on May 21, EA has decided that it will release the dynamic-link library (.dll file) and for both Tiberium Dawn and Red Alert, as well as the games' respective source codes. This will allow modding of the remastered game, something highly requested by fans.

Gamasutra's coverage

The Star Online covered it also

  • Electronic Arts to release 'Command & Conquer Remastered' source code to allow for modding

    Electronic Arts (EA) says it will allow players to mod its upcoming Command & Conquer Remastered Collection by making the game open source.

    The video game company's creative director Jim Vessella announced that due to popular demand, EA will be "releasing the TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code under the General Public License (GPL) version 3.0 license".

    He added that the move "to open source their source code under the GPL" was a first for EA, and possibly for any major real time strategy (RTS) franchise.

    With this, modders would have access to a new Map Editor as well as the ability to design maps, create custom units, replace art, alter gameplay logic and edit data.

    “Our goal was to deliver the source code in a way that would be truly beneficial for the community, and we hope this will enable amazing community projects for years to come,” Vessella said, in a blogpost.

Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert will be partially open-sourced

  • Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert will be partially open-sourced alongside remaster launch

    Today, EA gave another update regarding the upcoming Command & Conquer Remastered Collection, specifically about modding support for the two games in it, Tiberian Dawn and Red Alert. Surprisingly, it was revealed today that EA will be open-sourcing some key parts of the game.

    The open-sourced material, "TiberianDawn.dll and RedAlert.dll and their corresponding source code," will be under the GPL version 3.0 license, and will be released into the wild alongside the Remastered Collection's launch on June 5. Regarding this move, EA producer Jim Vessella said that "this is a key moment for Electronic Arts, the C&C community, and the gaming industry, as we believe this will be one of the first major RTS franchises to open source their source code under the GPL."

EA open sources code from Command & Conquer Remastered...

  • EA open sources code from Command & Conquer Remastered Collection

    As they said they would late last month, it appears Electronic Arts have gone ahead and uploaded some of the source code for the Command & Conquer Remastered Collection.

    Dropped onto GitHub recently is a new CnC_Remastered_Collection repository, containing plenty of code for both the original Command & Conquer Tiberian Dawn plus Red Alert. Properly done too, with a GPL3 license to go along with it. They've attached some addition terms with it, which the GPL3 allows, to mention things we would expect like not giving rights away to trademarks and such.

'Command & Conquer Remastered Collection' To Release Source...

  • 'Command & Conquer Remastered Collection' To Release Source Code

    Comprised of Command & Conquer: Tiberian Dawn, Command & Conquer: Red Alert and their three expansion packs - Covert Ops, Counterstrike and The Aftermath - the Command & Conquer Remastered Collection is a passion project between EA and some of the original Westwood Studios team members at Petroglyph.

    Command & Conquer Remastered Collection is being created alongside the C&C community, where the project was publicly revealed in October 2018 to gather community insight before development began. An active Community Council has been involved since early pre-production with 24/7 access to the development team. The title features rebuilt graphics and textures with support up to 4K resolution, along with an over seven-hour soundtrack remastered by the renowned original composer Frank Klepacki. The community has helped shape the enhancements of the game through highly requested features like revamped UI, updated controls and a Map Editor for fans to showcase their creations. Multiplayer has been rebuilt from the ground up to support a modern online experience with custom games, 1v1 quick match, Elo-based matchmaking, leaderboards, replays and much more.

Command and Conquer source code is now available on GitHub

  • Command and Conquer source code is now available on GitHub

    In May it was announced that the source code for Command and Conquer: Tiberian Dawn and Command and Conquer: Red Alert would be released to the public. Now in June that has been made a reality as the code is freely available on GitHub.

    This is to tie in with the release of the Command & Conquer Remastered Collection which goes live very soon on 5th June.

    This code has been released under a GNU General Public License v3.0 which, among other things, allows for commercial use of this resource. Before anyone rushes out to mess around with the code for whatever reason, we strongly recommend reading up on this licence and the specific Licence.txt which is included in the GitHub files here.

Electronic Arts to Release Source Code of Highly Successful Game

The Next Web's coverage

Command & Conquer Remastered

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