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LibreOffice 6.4.4 available for download

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Berlin, May 21, 2020 – The Document Foundation announces the availability of LibreOffice 6.4.4, the 4th minor release of the LibreOffice 6.4 family, targeted at technology enthusiasts and power users. LibreOffice 6.4.4 includes many bug fixes and improvements to document compatibility.

LibreOffice 6.4.4 represents the bleeding edge in term of features for open source office suites, and as such is not optimized for enterprise-class deployments, where features are less important than robustness. Users wanting a more mature version can download LibreOffice 6.3.6, which includes some months of back-ported fixes.

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LibreOffice 6.4.4 Is Now Available for Download with 98 Bug Fix

  • LibreOffice 6.4.4 Is Now Available for Download with 98 Bug Fixes

    Coming five weeks after LibreOffice 6.4.3, the LibreOffice 6.4.4 point release is here to address several bugs and other issues reported by the community or discovered by the LibreOffice developers. A total of 98 bugs have been fixed in this update, as documented here and here.

    Those of you using the latest LibreOffice 6.4 office suite series should upgrade to version 6.4.4 as soon as possible. Downloads are now available from the official website, but they’re also coming soon to the stable software repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution.

LibreOffice 6.4.4

  • LibreOffice 6.4.4

    LibreOffice is the free power-packed Open Source personal productivity suite for Windows, Macintosh and Linux, that gives you six feature-rich applications for all your document production and data processing needs: Writer, Calc, Impress, Draw, Math and Base. Support and documentation is free from our large, dedicated community of users, contributors and developers. You, too, can also get involved!

Libre Office 6.4.4 packages available for slackware-current

  • Libre Office 6.4.4 packages available for slackware-current

    The Document Foundation released the latest version of LibreOffice (6.4.4) yesterday, and I compiled a set of packages for Slackware -current. Unfortunately Slackware 14.2 is stuck at LibreOffice 6.2.x because newer source releases can not compile against the old libraries of our stable platform anymore).

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