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Microsoft Build: Same old recycled stuff, no upcycling

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Microsoft

Often, a proprietary software company's silence can speak as loudly as their latest campaign against a computer user's right to freedom. This is the case with Microsoft's developer-centric "Build" event. While Microsoft announced a few more welcome additions to its free software output, it missed the opportunity to demonstrate a real commitment to user freedom by upcycling its recently abandoned Windows 7 operating system under a free software license.

The predictable failure here here fits together well with the corporation's complex history of mixed messaging on freedom, which once compared copyleft to "a virus that gobbles up intellectual property like a Pac-Man," and yet now would have you believe that it "loves [free software]." Our Upcycle Windows 7 petition has given Microsoft the perfect opportunity to take the next step in its promotion of free software, to show that its "love" was real. We are disappointed, but not surprised, that they have ignored this call from us and thousands of potential users.

Although the petition signatures and "special gift" were signed, sealed, and delivered safely to their Redmond, WA headquarters, the FSF has not received any response from a Microsoft representative. Of course, the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the operations of even the largest companies, but as of yet, we haven't heard anything from Microsoft suggesting this was the reason for the lack of response. They certainly seem to have had the resources to put on a 48-hour video marathon about proprietary software.

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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • The benefits of a Kubernetes-native CI/CD server

    Tekton is a powerful, yet flexible, Kubernetes-native open source framework for creating continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) systems. With Tekton, developers can build, test, and deploy across multiple cloud providers or on-premise systems by abstracting away the underlying implementation details.

  • What I learned about goals on the Appalachian Trail

    As a hiking enthusiast, I had always dreamed of hiking the Appalachian Trail. Every time I drove up into the mountain for a day or weekend trip, I'd think of all the Appalachian Trail hikers and the kinds of people who embark on such a journey—the mental and physical exertion, the months away from family, friends, and work, the lack of those "real-life" creature comforts like hot showers and dry socks. I finally got the opportunity to hike the Appalachian Trail in April of 2017, and over the course of four and a half months, I completed the entire 2200-mile trip. And though the experience was a very personal journey, I still found myself learning lessons that I felt applied to other areas of life and that I thought might be of use to others on their own personal and professional journeys. In particular, I thought about goals, and how there are ways to go about setting and pursuing them that set you up for success. [...] I suppose it's easier to grasp in retrospect, but finally realizing a years-long goal of mine made me wonder what other goals I might have put off in my life because they seemed too big or I thought I wasn't enough. It's easy for us all to get discouraged by those kinds of thoughts, but it's also possible to shift your mindset and start thinking of any goal as achievable if you just start working toward it. After all, you can't hike 2200 miles if you don't take the first step.

  • IBM continues momentum in AI and trust leadership

    The field of artificial intelligence (AI) is making progress as it looks to improve industries and society. But, while the technology continues advancing, the idea of “build for performance” will no longer suffice as an AI design paradigm. We are now in an era where AI must be built, evaluated, and monitored for trust. IBM® continues to serve as an industry leader in advancing what we call Trusted AI, focused on developing diverse approaches that implement elements of fairness, explainability, and accountability across the entire lifecycle of an AI application.

  • The AIF360 fairness toolkit is now available for R users
  • The AIF360 team adds compatibility with scikit-learn
  • IBM Updates AI Fairness 360 Toolkit
  • BMW’s Self Driving Cars And Red Hat Technologies

    DXC Technology used Red Hat software to build a new data platform for BMW Group.

Qt for MCUs 1.2 released

Qt Quick Ultralite is designed to be a subset of the complete Qt Quick framework, its QML APIs aim to be directly compatible with its larger sibling even though the implementation is entirely different. Some key differences did however exist in Qt for MCUs 1.0 and 1.1. This release addresses the main ones, making it much easier to reuse QML code across all the platforms that Qt supports, from microcontrollers to mobile devices, to Desktop. If you are an experienced QML developer, that also means being able to jump into a Qt for MCUs project with minimal adaptation. Read more Also: Introducing Flow Mode in Qt Design Studio 1.5 - Part 1

AMD Graphics: Big Navi, RADV and Radeon

  • Fishy AMD Sienna CiChlid reference gets added to Linux driver patches, likely to be 'Big Navi' Navi 21

    About 207 patches for a new AMD GPU codenamed Sienna CiChlid have been committed to the AMD Radeon Linux Driver. Evidence from these patches suggests that Sienna CiChlid could, in fact, be Navi 21 aka Big Navi. The Sienna CiChlid Linux driver patches confirm support for VCN 3.0 and DCN 3.0 while a leaked slide indicates GDDR6 support and advanced clock and voltage control.

  • RADV Enables Zero vRAM Option For All Games With VKD3D

    Mesa's Radeon "RADV" Vulkan driver is now enabling the "zero vRAM" option for all VKD3D games -- Direct3D 12 titles running on Steam Play / Wine with this D3D12 to Vulkan layer -- in order to workaround various rendering bugs. Doom Eternal (native Vulkan, but still requires this workaround), Metro Exodus, and various other DirectX 12 games that rely on VKD3D when running under Steam Play / Wine have been hitting "colorful graphical aberrations" with the RADV driver but the issues go away when setting RADV_DEBUG=zerovram. As such, that option is now being enabled by default when VKD3D is present.

  • Radeon ROCm 3.5 Released With New Features But Still No Navi Support

    Radeon Open Compute 3.5 (ROCm 3.5) is now available with a number of improvements but surprisingly still no GFX10/Navi support. ROCm 3.5 was released today as the successor to ROCm 3.3 with no v3.4 milestone having been made public. Highlights of ROCm 3.5 include: - The Heterogeneous Compute Compiler (HCC) has been deprecated in favor of the HIP-Clang compiler for compiling HIP programs. The HIP-Clang code has been seeing a lot of work upstreamed into LLVM/Clang os overall this should be good in the long-run.

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