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Programming: Perl, Python, Java and JavaScript

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 61: Max Subarray Product and IP Address Partition

    These are some answers to the Week 61 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

  • Dataquest: New Course: NumPy for Data Engineers

    We've just launched a new interactive online course that'll take you from zero to pro with NumPy in the context of data engineering — dive in!

  • Switch A Django Project To Use Pytest - Building SaaS #57

    In this episode, I replaced the default Django test runner to use pytest. We walked through installation, configuration, how to change tests, and the benefits that come from using pytest.

    We started by looking at the current state of the test suite to provide a baseline to compare against. After that, I went to PyPI to find the version of pytest-django that we wanted to install. I added the package to my requirements-dev.txt and installed the update.

  • Oracle’s Linux Team Wishes the Java Community a Happy 25th

    From one open source community to another, Oracle’s Linux team would like to congratulate the Java community on its 25th anniversary! Java has an impressive history. It was a breakthrough in programming languages, allowing developers to write once and have code run anywhere. And, it has enabled developers to create a myriad of innovative solutions that help run our world. Read Georges Saab’s post to learn more.

    Both open source technologies, Java and Linux benefit from communities that collectively drive their advancements. While the technologies aren’t similar, there are areas where both work together and complement each other.

    One area is Java’s support for Linux HugePages. Using Linux HugePages can improve system performance by reducing the amount of resources needed to manage memory. The result of less overhead in the system means more resources are available for Java and the Java app, which can make both run faster.

  • New Training Course Advances Knowledge to Encourage Node.js Application Development Careers

    LFW211, developed in conjunction with the OpenJS Foundation, is geared toward developers who wish to master and demonstrate Node.js specialization, in particular for creating Node.js applications. The course provides core skills for effectively harnessing a broad range of Node.js capabilities at depth, equipping developers with rigorous foundational skills and knowledge that will translate to building any kind of Node.js application or library.

Java programming language celebrates 25 years

  • Java programming language celebrates 25 years

    The Java programming language celebrates its silver anniversary this week, with May 23, 2020, marking 25 years from the day Sun Microsystems first introduced Java to the world. The venerable language has remained popular with enterprises even as a slew of rival languages, such as Python and Go, now compete for the hearts and minds of software developers. But Java is not standing still, with a revamp designed to address longtime pain points now in the offing.

    Arising out of the “Oak” project begun in 1991 and spearheaded by James Gosling, object-oriented Java gained fame for its “write once, run anywhere” portability, as the Java Virtual Machine supported multiple hardware platforms and operating systems, and Java applets could be run from a webpage. Java applets offered better performance than JavaScript for many years, but eventually fell out of favor with browser makers and were removed from Java in 2018.

Linux Foundation Launches Node.js Application Development Course

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More in Tux Machines

German bill provides network traffic redirection to install state trojans

Preliminary note: This post primarily affects users falling under German jurisdiction, but may apply to other countries as well, where similar laws are already in place or about to be introduced. Unfortunately, some primary sources are German only. According to current status and local knowledge, the German government is about to establish a law that provides the redirection of network traffic through a intelligence agencies' infrastructure in order to exploit security vulnerabilities and, for example, to install a certain type of malware known as Staatstrojaner (state trojans). The bill lists both end-user devices and servers as potential targets, and requires "telecommunication service providers" to establish and maintain infrastructure for transparently redirecting traffic of certain users, households, or IP addresses. "Telecommunication service providers" covers any company providing telecommunication services, thus ranging from cable, DSL or fiber providers to mail, VoIP and messaging vendors. Ultimately, even backbone providers or internet exchanges are covered by this definition. [...] The state trojan was meant to be the ultima ratio when it was introduced in 2009. It could only be used by the Federal Criminal Police Office (Bundeskriminalamt) in case of international terrorism and preventing terrorist attacks. Once such laws were introduced, governments usually get a taste for it. As of today, any police authority may use it even in cases of less severe crimes than terrorism such as counterfeiting money or violations against the Narcotics Act (Betäubungsmittelgesetz, e. g. drug consumption or trafficking). As you can see, compromising devices became increasingly common as a measure at law enforcement agencies. It is probably going to be extended to intelligence agencies within a short amount of time. For obvious historical reasons, the German state only gives certain rights to police and intelligence agencies to avoid too much power being concentrated in one organisation, which could turn it against their people. [...] At IPFire, we fight to protect your network. Frankly, this was complicated enough before governments legalised hacking by intelligence agencies. This German bill will not make anything more secure. Instead, it will turn defense against security vulnerabilities even more into an arms race. This is not an example of "the opposite of good is good intentions". This is beyond dangerous. Imagine, for example, cyber criminals or foreign intelligence agencies (ab)using that redirection infrastructure in order to deploy their malware. Perhaps they will be able to take advantage of some zero day exploits left on some servers in that infrastructure as well (the CIA suffered from a similar breach in 2017). With a blink of an eye, arbitrary malware could be placed on a significant amount of computers compromised that way. Ransomware attacks such as WannaCry or NonPetya come to mind... Imagine compromised machines being vulnerable to other attacks as well, as some security measures have been turned off. Image surveillance abuse. Imagine future governments abusing this feature for persecution of unwanted people or political opponents - with a view at current political events, one may be concerned about personal liberties being restricted. [...] We will start next week by providing advice on whom to trust and how to establish a security-focussed mindset. Afterwards, we focus on specific technical aspects and advise how to configure IPFire machines as secure as possible - as it already implements effective mitigations against those attacks. Read more

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

Brume-W Pocket-Sized Wireless Gateway Runs OpenWrt or Ubuntu (Crowdfunding)

GL.iNet Brume-W (GL-MV1000W) is a “pocket-sized wireless gateway for edge computing” that supports high-speed VPN up to 280Mbps with WireGuard, AdGuard ad-blocking software (AdGuard), and Tor. The device features three Gigabit Ethernet ports and built-in 2.4 GHz WiFi 4 connectivity, but it also supports Alfa AWUS036AC and AWUS036ACS USB WiFf USB dongles for users wanting dual-band WiFi 5 (AC) networking. The router ships with OpenWrt pre-installed, but also supports Ubuntu. Read more