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App Icon Preview 2.0.0 released

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GNOME

App Icon Preview is the very first utility made by the GNOME Design Tooling team, created originally by Zander Brown a year ago. Since then, we have been crafting other small yet useful utilities for the GNOME design team.

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Programming: Perl, Python, Javascript and LibreOffice GSoC

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    The Week #068 is my 23rd week in a row participating the weekly challenge. For the first time, I created a package to deal with the “Reorder List” task. It really helped me in thinking straight when dealing with linked list. With the help my favourite CPAN module Moo, creating class is like piece of cake as shown below.

  • Hey, Back Off!

    The choice in parameters for back-off configuration is important. It can be the difference between a barely noticable blip in service quality and an hours-long site outage. In order to explore the consequences of the choice, I wrote a little fictional ditty about a fictional website. I hope you enjoy escaping into this fictional reality as much as I enjoyed writing about it. Your recipe site is different. After all, recipe sites are a dime-a-dozen. With today's modern technology, any kid can put a quick mock-up together with Django, React, and MongoDB to store recipes and retrieve them by various attributes. In order to make your recipe site stand above the rest, you made sure it uses really cutting edge techniques. From details of the web requests coming in, using sophisiticated language parsing and machine learning algorithm, with just a few words about the user's likes and dislikes, you find the perfect recipe just for them. HackerNews called it "just a bunch of buzzwords", of course. But once the graphs went up into the right, with 50% month-over-month growth rates, everyone explained that they knew that this one was different. Popularity sky-rocketed, the engineers worked on scaling up the site, and though it was not the world's most sophisticated microservice architecture, it was medium-service architecture, at least. The web front end would call the machine learning cluster, running on special GPU machines, to get the appropriate keywords by which to look up the recipe. Maybe not a the kind of 50-microservices-architecture that takes three whiteboards to explain, but at least it was easy enough to scale up horizontally. You hired a great Site Reliability Engineer, who built a sophisticated continuous delivery machine. As your machine learning team fine-tuned the model, it would slowly roll out into the cluster, running continous A/B tests that would immediately roll back the change if the model performed worse than before.

  • Python map() Function

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  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC: Week #7
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  • Introduction to Javascript loops

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  • Ahmed ElShreif: Week 6 Report

    1) The last week I left 5 patches without merging. They are mainly the patches that add support for Calc-comments and Vertical Tab Control. Also the patches of the Calc-comment demo , Writer-comment demo and insert hyperlink demo. The five patches now are merged after working on solving all the comments. The patches can be found in patches status section in the report .

Games: Celeste/Stadia, How to Play Windows Games on GNU/Linux, MOBAs on Android

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    Wow, the end of another week over here in the surprisingly hot and sunny UK. Perfect weather to be sat inside playing games and there's been plenty of that here. Thanks to the news of Celeste coming to Stadia, I was reminded of the fact that Celeste was in the recent itch.io charity bundle so I've been able to give it a thorough go after only previously playing it at a friends PC. I already liked it a lot but now I've sunk plenty more hours into it I'm totally blown away by it. It's truly no surprise to me now why it has amassed such a following, like on Steam where it has over twenty thousand views an an overall Overwhelmingly Positive rating.

  • [Older] How to Play PC Games on Linux

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  • The 20 Best MOBAs for Android Device to Try in 2020

    In comparison to different Android gaming genres, MOBA is a newcomer. But this short time of presence is enough for this extensively exciting game to get immense popularity. However, MOBA is the short form of a long name gaming genre that we know as Multiplayer Online Battle Arena. The uniqueness of this game lets you enjoy fighting on the battlefield side by side with your friends though you are staying far away from each other. It’s like maintaining a connection without friends in the gaming world. If you love to try one, it should be one of the best MOBAs for Android. Otherwise, you may not find the true excitement of playing these games.

Screencasts and Audiocasts: Neptune OS 6.5, GNU World Order, Python

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  • GNU World Order 362

    **Gutenprint**, **HPLIP**, and **htop** from Slackware software set AP.

  • Talk Python to Me: #272 No IoT things in hand? Simulate them with Device Simulator Express [Roy: "Talk Python to Me" appears to be boosting Microsoft monopolists and proprietary software again]

    Python is one of the primary languages for IoT devices. With runtimes such as CircuitPython and MicroPython, they are ideal for the really small IoT chips. Maybe you've heard of the Circuit Playground Express, BBC micro:bit, or the fancy Adafruit CLUE. They aren't too expensive (ranging from $25 to $50 each). But for large groups such as classrooms, this can be a lot of money. Moreover, getting your hands on these devices can sometimes be tricky as well.

today's howtos