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today's howtos

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HowTos

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers (Red Hat Picks and Security Mostly)

           
  • WordPress 5.5 Beta 1

    WordPress 5.5 Beta 1 is now available for testing! This software is still in development, so it’s not recommended to run this version on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version. [...] Keep your eyes on the Make WordPress Core blog for 5.5-related developer notes in the coming weeks, breaking down these and other changes in greater detail. So far, contributors have fixed more than 350 tickets in WordPress 5.5, including 155 new features and enhancements, and more bug fixes are on the way.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (php7.3), Fedora (gst), Mageia (libvirt, mariadb, pdns-recursor, and ruby), openSUSE (chocolate-doom, coturn, kernel, live555, ntp, python3, and rust, rust-cbindgen), Oracle (virt:ol), Red Hat (file, firefox, gettext, kdelibs, kernel, kernel-alt, microcode_ctl, nghttp2, nodejs:10, nodejs:12, php, qemu-kvm, ruby, and tomcat), SUSE (libjpeg-turbo, mozilla-nspr, mozilla-nss, mozilla-nss, nasm, openldap2, and permissions), and Ubuntu (coturn, glibc, nss, and openexr).

  • Lawsuit & Bi-Partisan Group Of Senators Seek To Push Back On Trump Administration's Attempt To Corrupt The Open Technology Fund

    Last month we wrote about how the newly appointed head of the US Agency for Global Media (USAGM) had cleaned house, getting rid of the heads of the various organizations under the USAGM umbrella. That included Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio Free Asia, Middle East Broadcasting... and the Open Technology Fund. The general story making the rounds is that Pack, a Steve Bannon acolyte, planned to turn the famously independent media operations into a propaganda arm for the Trump administration. Leaving side the concerns about why this is so dangerous and problematic on the media side, we focused mostly on the one "different" organization under the USAGM banner: the Open Technology Fund.

  • EFF Joins Coalition Calling On the EU to Introduce Interoperability Rules

    Today, EFF sent a joint letter to European Commission Executive Vice President Margrethe Vestager, highlighting the enormous potential of interoperability to help achieve the EU’s goals for Europe’s digital future. EFF joins a strong coalition of organizations representing European civil society organizations, entrepreneurs, and SMEs. We are calling on the European Commission to consider the role interoperability can play in ensuring that technology creates a fair and competitive economy and strengthens an open, democratic, and sustainable society. Specifically, we urge the Commission to include specific measures requiring interoperability of large Internet platforms in the forthcoming Digital Services Act package. This will strengthen user empowerment and competition in the European digital single market.

    Interoperability mandates will enable users to exercise greater control over their online experiences. No longer confronted with the binary choice of either staying on dominant platforms that do not serve their needs or losing access to their social network, users will be able to choose freely the tools that best respect their privacy, security, or accessibility preferences. Interoperability rules will also be crucial to ensure a dynamic market in which new entrants and innovative business models will have a fair shot to convince users of their value.

  • How not to treat a customer

    First, my complaint to Simply NUC about the recent comedy of errors around my attempt to order a replacement fan for Cathy’s NUC. 

  • Kafka Monthly Digest – May 2020
  • Kafka Monthly Digest – June 2020

    In this 29th edition of the Kafka Monthly Digest, I’ll cover what happened in the Apache Kafka community in June 2020.

  • Introduction to Watson AutoAI

    AutoML is a current buzzword that appears in a lot in tech industry articles and research, and is a product offering in many vendor product catalogs. It’s also one of the topics that I get asked about, such as “How to approach AutoML products”, “Will these products perform all of the steps of the machine learning lifecycle while giving me as a data scientist some control over the parameters?”

  • Red Hat Learning Subscription News Flash 5: First look at Red Hat Remote Certification Exams
  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Testing Accidents

    Armed with a colossal set of patches in my zink-wip branch and feeling again like maybe it was time to be a team player instead of charging off down the field on my own, I decided yesterday morning to check out Erik’s MR to enable ARB_depth_clamp that’s been blocked on a failing piglit test for several weeks. The extension was working, supposedly, and all this MR does is enable it for use, so how hard could this be?

KDE and LibreOffice GSoC

  • Week 4 and 5: GSoC Project Report

    This is the report for week 4 and week 5 combined into one because I couldn’t do much during week 4 due to college tests and assignments, so there was not much to report for that week. These two weeks I worked on implementing interactions between the the storyboard docker and timeline docker (or the new Animation Timeline docker). Most of the interactions from the timeline docker to the storyboard docker are implemented.

  • Cantor - Plots handling improvments

    this is the third post about the progress in my GSoC project and I want to present new changes in the handling of the external packages in Cantor. The biggest changes done recently happened for Python. We now properly support integrated plots created with matplotlib. Cantor intercepts the creation of plots and embedds the result into its worksheet. This also works if multiple plots are created in one step the order of plots is preserved. Also, text results between plots are also supported.

  • Google Summer of Code 2020 - Week 4

    According to my GSoC proposal, I should be done with the general purpose graph layout capabilities for Rocs and free to start working on layout algorithms specifically designed to draw trees. This is not the case for a series of reasons, including my decision to write my own implementation of a general purpose force-based graph layout algorithm and failure to anticipate the need for non-functional tests to evaluate the quality of the layouts. I still need to document the functionalities of the plugin and improve the code documentation as well. Besides that, although it is not present in my original purpose, I really want to include the layout algorithm presented in [1], because I have high expectations about the quality of the layouts it can produce. [...] By taking advantage of the properties of trees, even simple solutions such as my one-day experimental implementation can guarantee some desirable layout properties that the general purpose force-based layout algorithm can not. For instance, it guarantees that there are no intersections between edges or between nodes. The force-based layout algorithm I implemented can generate layouts with pairs of edges that intersect even when applied to trees.

  • Simulated Animation Effects Week#5

    I’ve started past week by going over my implementation of simulated animation effects and getting rid of the rough parts, so it would be somewhat ready to be merged into LO master. While doing so, realized I’ve forgot to add support for other types of ongoing animations in parallel with a simulated animation. So to implement this, I thought all animation instances would have a reference to box2DWorld, if box2DWorld is initiated (as in there’s a simulated animation going on), these animations would supply box2DWorld with required information on how to update shape corresponding to this animation instance. The information supplied would have the uno shape reference of that animation effect, type of the update box2DWorld will perform (change position, appear/disappear, change size etc.), and if required any additional info (for instance, if it is an path motion animation, it would supply the updated position of the shape).

Programming Leftovers (Mostly Python)

  • Introducing dwatch, the ultimate DTrace tool

    With over 3.5 years of development time and over 16 rounds of refactoring and enhancement, my tool dwatch for DTrace has reached maturity and is quickly becoming the new hip tool for all your monitoring tasks. I would like to show you how to do everything from watching the system process scheduler in realtime to filtering out filesystem events.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSimdJson 0.1.0: Now on Windows, With Parsers and Faster Still!

    A smashing new RcppSimdJson release 0.1.0 containing several small updates to upstream simdjson (now at 0.4.6) in part triggered by very excisting work by Brendan who added actual parser from file and string—and together with Daniel upstream worked really hard to make Windows builds as well as complete upstream tests on our beloved (ahem) MinGW platform possible. So this version will, once the builders have caught up, give everybody on Windows a binary—with a JSON parser running circles around the (arguably more feature-rich and possibly easier-to-use) alternatives. Dave just tweeted a benchmark snippet by Brendan, the full set is at the bottom our issue ticket for this release.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: AsioHeaders 1.16.1-1 on CRAN

    An updated version of the AsioHeaders package arrived on CRAN today (after a we days of “rest” in the incoming directory of CRAN). Asio provides a cross-platform C++ library for network and low-level I/O programming. It is also included in Boost – but requires linking when used as part of Boost. This standalone version of Asio is a header-only C++ library which can be used without linking (just like our BH package with parts of Boost).

  • Django Testing Toolbox

    What are the tools that I use to test a Django app? Let’s find out! You might say I’m test obsessed. I like having very high automated test coverage. This is especially true when I’m working on solo applications. I want the best test safety net that I can have to protect me from myself. We’re going to explore the testing packages that I commonly use on Django projects. We’ll also look at a few of the important techniques that I apply to make my testing experience great.

  • Adding New Columns to a Dataframe in Pandas (with Examples)

    In this Pandas tutorial, we are going to learn all there is about adding new columns to a dataframe. Here, we are going to use the same three methods that we used to add empty columns to a Pandas dataframe.

  • Pointers and Objects in Python

    If you’ve ever worked with lower-level languages like C or C++, then you may have heard of pointers. Pointers are essentially variables that hold the memory address of another variable. They allow you to create great efficiency in parts of your code but can lead to various memory management bugs. You’ll learn about Python’s object model and see why pointers in Python don’t really exist. For the cases where you need to mimic pointer behavior, you’ll learn ways to simulate pointers in Python without managing memory.

  • Python 101 – Debugging Your Code with pdb

    Mistakes in your code are known as “bugs”. You will make mistakes. You will make many mistakes, and that’s totally fine. Most of the time, they will be simple mistakes such as typos. But since computers are very literal, even typos prevent your code from working as intended. So they need to be fixed. The process of fixing your mistakes in programming is known as debugging. The Python programming language comes with its own built-in debugger called pdb. You can use pdb on the command line or import it as a module. The name, pdb, is short for “Python debugger”.

  • beagle 0.3.0

    beagle is a command line tool for querying a hound code search service such as http://codesearch.openstack.org

  • Python Flask Tutorial: How to Make a Basic Page (Source Code Included!)

    Python Flask is a crucial tool I use daily to prototype my ideas and bring a product to market faster than triditional methods like PHP or Ruby. These benefits make it the ideal tool for small teams or startups trying to get an MVP off the ground. It removes the need to worry about complexities and just focus on making cool websites. Today I am going to show you how to make a basic page in Flask and pass input back through to a Python function on the backend.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #428 (July 7, 2020)
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 6 Blog
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #6
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 5 Check-in
  • Late Weekly challenge 67 #1 only

    I wrote some library to make combination in 2013. I was overwhelming when I found this challenge but I found that it is buggy !!! I think that finding combination isn't necessarily written using recursive calling. so this is my first "working" solution.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Women In Linux Podcast

  • LHS Episode #355: Warp Two

    Hello and welcome to the 355th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts wrap up Field Day 2020 and then dive into other topics including: RSGB webinars, the WIA, the QSO Today Ham Expo, open-source COVID-19 tracking software, Linux Mint 20, ADS-B trackers for Raspberry Pi and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week out there.

  • #wiLinux Podcast: Amy Rich | Director of Engineering

    Amy Rich has been an Ops person for over 25 years at a variety of companies, helped ship Firefox to hundreds of millions of users, owned her own consulting business, helped organize multiple conferences for USENIX, and written professionally on the topic of UNIX systems administration.

  • #WOMENINLINUX Podcast: Amy Rich – Redox

    On this episode of the #WomenInLinux Podcast we have Amy Rich! [...] In her head, she frames what she loves about her job as “bringing order from chaos.” Amy values being able to use her technical and professional skills to make a positive difference in the world. These days her job title reads “Sr. Director of DevOps” at Redox. and a member of the Board of Directors of the USENIX Association. In her spare time she’s a board/card game addict, Star Wars LEGO nerd, horrible guitar player, fan of music, books, and movies, and enjoy taking pictures of the places traveled.

  • #wiLinux Podcast: Denise Barreto | Community & Leadership

    Denise W. Barreto is an entrepreneur, author and TEDx speaker with over 20 years of leadership and marketing experience across multiple industries. As founder and managing partner of Relationships Matter Now her firm serves businesses of all sizes, non-profit and government agencies who want to better leverage their relationships to grow their bottom line through strategic planning, HR system infrastructure, organizational and leader development and inclusion and diversity strategy.

  • #WomenInLinux Podcast: Lynn Langit – BigData/Cloud Architect

    Lynn Langit creates big data and cloud architectures with AWS, Microsoft, Google, and OpenStack technologies. She also works with SQL Server, MongoDB, Google Big Query, Redis, Neo4j, and Hadoop. Lynn is also the cofounder of Teaching Kids Programming, and has spoken on data and cloud technologies in many countries. She is an ACM Distinguished Speaker.

  • #WomenInLinux Podcast: Julie Gunderson – Community Manager

    Former Community Manager for Taos. Julie Gunderson is a DevOps Advocate at PagerDuty, where she works to further the adoption of DevOps best practices and methodologies. She has been actively involved in the DevOps space for over five years and is passionate about helping individuals, teams and organizations understand how to leverage DevOps and develop amazing cultures. Julie has delivered talks at conferences such as DevOpsDays, Velocity, Agile Conf, OSCON and more, as well as being community moderator at opensource.com. Julie is also a founding member and co-organizer of DevOpsDays Boise.