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Python Programming

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  • Invoking Zato Python microservices with OpenAPI

    One of the exciting additions of the upcoming Zato 3.2 release is the ability to invoke services through OpenAPI endpoints without a need for creation of REST channels explicitly - read more for details.

    Python code

    Supposing we have a service such as below - note that it is uses SimpleIO and that each of its input/output attributes is documented in the docstring - we would like to invoke it from an external application while delegating to Zato as much effort involved in it as possible.

  • … and benchmarks

    And he also tries Cython on this benchmark. However, for whatever reason, he tries it on the second version, where the Python runtime is doing all the work, not on the first one, which is the one that is computationally heavy in user code. Unsurprisingly, compiling the second version gives almost no speed-up compared to exercising the exact same implementation of the built-in range(), str(), map() and list() functions in the interpreter.

  • A beginner's guide to web scraping with Python

    Many people find instructional books useful, but I do not typically learn by reading a book front to back. I learn by doing a project, struggling, figuring some things out, and then reading another book. So, throw away your book (for now), and let's learn some Python.

    What follows is a guide to my first scraping project in Python. It is very low on assumed knowledge in Python and HTML. This is intended to illustrate how to access web page content with Python library requests and parse the content using BeatifulSoup4, as well as JSON and pandas. I will briefly introduce Selenium, but I will not delve deeply into how to use that library—that topic deserves its own tutorial. Ultimately I hope to show you some tricks and tips to make web scraping less overwhelming.

  • Waiting in asyncio

    One of the main appeals of using asyncio is being able to fire off many coroutines and run them concurrently. How many ways do you know for waiting for their results?

    There’s quite a bit of them! However the different ways have different properties and all of them deserve their place. However I regularly have to look them up to find the right one.

More in Tux Machines

Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Lite 5.0, Ubuntu Core, Linux Headlines, Raspberry Pi OS, LINUX Unplugged and mintCast

  • Linux Lite 5.0 overview | Simple Fast Free.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Linux Lite 5.0 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Ubuntu Core, IoT and systems-on-(ARM)-chips

    In this episode, we’re joined by two representatives working at Canonical, the financial entity and umbrella company behind Ubuntu. Galem Kayo and Loic Minier work at that organization’s Ubuntu Core and Ubuntu Mobile Embedded projects. With IoT and its much older cousin, IIoT, ever-present as buzzphrases at the moment alongside 5G, self-driving cars and AI, we get the lowdown on what IoT really means in a practical sense. From early days of hobbyists putting together mobile devices and needing an OS to run on them, the Ubuntu flavor of Linux now runs on IoT devices found in installations of every type, all over the world. Modular construction of the software in a series of discrete “snaps” means that the days of having to flash updates via hardware is now a thing of history (one that your host, sadly, can remember).

  • 2020-06-03 | Linux Headlines

    Lenovo doubles down on Linux support, Firefox 77 arrives with better extension permission handling, the Tor Browser’s latest release focuses on exposing features to users, Nextcloud Hub 19 includes security and collaboration improvements, and the Linux Professional Institute launches a new webzine.

  • Checking out the new 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 and 64-bit Raspberry Pi OS Beta

    With the new Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB of RAM, new possibilities are opened and using a Pi as your desktop is now more possible than ever. In this video, I show off the new 8GB Pi with some first impressions of the new 64-bit version of Raspberry Pi OS.

  • Linux Hardware Love | LINUX Unplugged 356

    From the low-end to the high-end we try out both ends of the Linux hardware spectrum. Wes reviews the latest XPS 13, and Chris shares his thoughts on the Pinebook Pro. Plus a really cool new feature in Linux 5.7, and we get some answers to the recent GNOME patent settlement from the source.

  • mintCast 336 – Sneaky Snek

    First up, in our Wanderings, Erik gardens, Tony Hughes bakes cars, Moss throws everything up in the air, Tony Watts goes live, Joe fills his brain, Bo fights a snake, and Leo fixes an oven Then, in the news, Gnome wins, Microsoft loses, Linux moves on In security, GitLab goes fishing

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • The benefits of a Kubernetes-native CI/CD server

    Tekton is a powerful, yet flexible, Kubernetes-native open source framework for creating continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) systems. With Tekton, developers can build, test, and deploy across multiple cloud providers or on-premise systems by abstracting away the underlying implementation details.

  • What I learned about goals on the Appalachian Trail

    As a hiking enthusiast, I had always dreamed of hiking the Appalachian Trail. Every time I drove up into the mountain for a day or weekend trip, I'd think of all the Appalachian Trail hikers and the kinds of people who embark on such a journey—the mental and physical exertion, the months away from family, friends, and work, the lack of those "real-life" creature comforts like hot showers and dry socks. I finally got the opportunity to hike the Appalachian Trail in April of 2017, and over the course of four and a half months, I completed the entire 2200-mile trip. And though the experience was a very personal journey, I still found myself learning lessons that I felt applied to other areas of life and that I thought might be of use to others on their own personal and professional journeys. In particular, I thought about goals, and how there are ways to go about setting and pursuing them that set you up for success. [...] I suppose it's easier to grasp in retrospect, but finally realizing a years-long goal of mine made me wonder what other goals I might have put off in my life because they seemed too big or I thought I wasn't enough. It's easy for us all to get discouraged by those kinds of thoughts, but it's also possible to shift your mindset and start thinking of any goal as achievable if you just start working toward it. After all, you can't hike 2200 miles if you don't take the first step.

  • IBM continues momentum in AI and trust leadership

    The field of artificial intelligence (AI) is making progress as it looks to improve industries and society. But, while the technology continues advancing, the idea of “build for performance” will no longer suffice as an AI design paradigm. We are now in an era where AI must be built, evaluated, and monitored for trust. IBM® continues to serve as an industry leader in advancing what we call Trusted AI, focused on developing diverse approaches that implement elements of fairness, explainability, and accountability across the entire lifecycle of an AI application.

  • The AIF360 fairness toolkit is now available for R users
  • The AIF360 team adds compatibility with scikit-learn
  • IBM Updates AI Fairness 360 Toolkit
  • BMW’s Self Driving Cars And Red Hat Technologies

    DXC Technology used Red Hat software to build a new data platform for BMW Group.

Qt for MCUs 1.2 released

Qt Quick Ultralite is designed to be a subset of the complete Qt Quick framework, its QML APIs aim to be directly compatible with its larger sibling even though the implementation is entirely different. Some key differences did however exist in Qt for MCUs 1.0 and 1.1. This release addresses the main ones, making it much easier to reuse QML code across all the platforms that Qt supports, from microcontrollers to mobile devices, to Desktop. If you are an experienced QML developer, that also means being able to jump into a Qt for MCUs project with minimal adaptation. Read more Also: Introducing Flow Mode in Qt Design Studio 1.5 - Part 1

AMD Graphics: Big Navi, RADV and Radeon

  • Fishy AMD Sienna CiChlid reference gets added to Linux driver patches, likely to be 'Big Navi' Navi 21

    About 207 patches for a new AMD GPU codenamed Sienna CiChlid have been committed to the AMD Radeon Linux Driver. Evidence from these patches suggests that Sienna CiChlid could, in fact, be Navi 21 aka Big Navi. The Sienna CiChlid Linux driver patches confirm support for VCN 3.0 and DCN 3.0 while a leaked slide indicates GDDR6 support and advanced clock and voltage control.

  • RADV Enables Zero vRAM Option For All Games With VKD3D

    Mesa's Radeon "RADV" Vulkan driver is now enabling the "zero vRAM" option for all VKD3D games -- Direct3D 12 titles running on Steam Play / Wine with this D3D12 to Vulkan layer -- in order to workaround various rendering bugs. Doom Eternal (native Vulkan, but still requires this workaround), Metro Exodus, and various other DirectX 12 games that rely on VKD3D when running under Steam Play / Wine have been hitting "colorful graphical aberrations" with the RADV driver but the issues go away when setting RADV_DEBUG=zerovram. As such, that option is now being enabled by default when VKD3D is present.

  • Radeon ROCm 3.5 Released With New Features But Still No Navi Support

    Radeon Open Compute 3.5 (ROCm 3.5) is now available with a number of improvements but surprisingly still no GFX10/Navi support. ROCm 3.5 was released today as the successor to ROCm 3.3 with no v3.4 milestone having been made public. Highlights of ROCm 3.5 include: - The Heterogeneous Compute Compiler (HCC) has been deprecated in favor of the HIP-Clang compiler for compiling HIP programs. The HIP-Clang code has been seeing a lot of work upstreamed into LLVM/Clang os overall this should be good in the long-run.