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Android Leftovers

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu’s New Desktop Installer Is Now Available for Public Testing, Here’s How to Test It

In early March, I took a first look at the Ubuntu’s new Desktop Installer as Canonical provided web-based designs of the new installer ahead of its initial release as part of the Ubuntu installation images, but now the installer written in Flutter is finally available for public testing in the latest daily build images of Ubuntu 21.10. The biggest changes in Ubuntu’s new Desktop Installer, besides the modern design that applies to all of the installer’s pages, is a brand-new “Try or Install” page that includes a “Repair Installation” option to help you repair a broken Ubuntu system, the ability to turn off Intel RST (Rapid Storage Technology) if you’re installing Ubuntu alongside Windows, a new page to allocate disk space, and a new page to choose between Light and Dark themes. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Run Every Distro At Once | LINUX Unplugged 417

    Yabba Dabba Distro! Run every major distribution on one native host. How we hijacked a Fedora install and turned it into the ultimate meta Linux box. Plus Valve and AMD team up to improve Linux performance and the duct-tape solution holding our server together.

  • Win a $10,000 Thelio Major Workstation!

    The computer and operating system are the most powerful tools in existence. The Launch into Learning season encourages STEM and creative professionals like you to hone their craft, learn a new skill, or make something they’re proud to share. This year, we’re empowering one lucky user with a $10,000 Thelio Major workstation. The complete package includes a Launch keyboard, an MX Master 3 wireless mouse, a 27” 1440p IPS display, and a decked-out Thelio Major.

  • U.S. medical entities fall prey to Pysa threat actors, but many haven’t disclosed it – at least, not yet.
  • Damage control: Microsoft deletes all comments under heavily criticized Windows 11 upgrade video
  • C++ Vector Iterators – Linux Hint

    The main iterators in C++ are Input Iterator, Output Iterator, Forward Iterator, Bidirectional Iterator, and Random Access Iterator. Reverse Iterator is not really an iterator; it is an iterator adaptor. There are some variants to iterators, like a constant iterator. An iterator is an elaborated pointer. Like a pointer, it points to objects of the same type in memory at different times. All iterators are dereferenceable, except for the output iterator that is dereferenceable only for a set of types. Dereferenceable means the value pointed to by the pointer or iterator can be obtained using the indirection operator, *. An integer can be added to some iterators in the same way, and for the same purpose, the integer would be added to a pointer. The questions for this article are: What are these iterators? Which of these iterators are used with the C++ vector? How are these iterators used with the C++ vector? This article answers all these questions in a simplified way. At the end of this article, when all these questions would have been answered, C++ vector iterators will be intuitive and natural (for the reader).

  • Security breaches where working from home is involved are costlier, claims IBM report

    Firms looking to save money by shifting to more flexible ways of working will need to think carefully about IT security and the additional cost of breaches linked to staff working from home. That's according to the latest annual "Cost of a Data Breach Report" conducted by Ponemon Institute along with IBM Security, which found that the average total cost of a remote-working data breach was more than $1m higher than cyberattacks where remote working wasn't a factor.

  • IBM Cloud took the evening off – 23 services were hard to provision for eight hours

    IBM cloud has experienced a significant Severity One outage – the rating Big Blue uses to denote the most serious incidents that make resources in its cloud unavailable to customers. The impact was indeed severe: IBM stated that users might not be able to access its catalogue of cloudy services or provision affected services.

Hardware From Vecow and Arduino

  • Vecow unveils Intel Atom x6211E based fanless Box PC & Pico-ITX motherboard

    Vecow EPBC-1000 2.5-inc/Pico-ITX single board computer powered by an Intel Atom x6211E Elkhart Lake processor, and found in the company’s PBC-1000 ultra-compact fanless embedded box PC, is designed for edge applications such as intelligent control, energy management, M2M, In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI), factory automation, and any AIoT or Industry 4.0 applications.

  • This massive five-axis CNC machine is 3D-printable | Arduino Blog

    CNC (Computer Numerical Control) mills, routers, and lathes are indispensable manufacturing tools. If you need a part that adheres to tight tolerances, you turn to a CNC machine. Industrial CNC equipment is usually large, heavy, and very expensive. But small models exist for light-duty hobby jobs. This DIY device designed by Brian Brocken stands out because it is huge, has five axes, and is 3D-printable.

  • Hacking an old Nintendo Zapper into a wireless remote | Arduino Blog

    Those of us who have experienced the Nintendo Zapper while playing games such as Duck Hunt will probably have fond memories of it. However, with the rapid disappearance of CRT TVs and the aging of the physical mechanisms, YouTuber DuctTape Mechanic wanted to give an old Zapper a new lease on life. His modification integrated a small RF transmitting module into the top of the device, allowing it to be switched on by the trigger’s microswitch. With everything in place inside the Zapper, he moved onto the receiver.

Top 5 Software Tools for Linux with Data Encryption

Data encryption is a must-have feature in today’s world of cybersecurity. It allows you to encode your data making it unintelligible to someone who doesn’t have the authorized access. To be more secure online, it might be a good idea to opt for software that comes with this useful feature by default. Read more