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OSS Leftovers

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  • A look at how Jitsi became a ‘secure’ open-source alternative to Zoom

    Apart from being open-sourced, Jitsi benefited from endorsements by a few highly-regarded names in the security community. In March, a privacy-focused browser Tor tweeted about the product as an alternative to Zoom.

  • Why the entire open source movement is under threat right now

    To date, the Covid-19 pandemic has affected over 170 technology events worldwide. Some of them have been postponed and others have moved online, but the majority have been cancelled outright.

    This has had a significant impact on the open source community, placing high-profile organizations and projects under mounting financial pressure.

  • dav1d 0.7.0: mobile focus

    The VideoLAN, VLC and FFmpeg communities have been working on a new AV1 decoder, dav1d, in order to create the best and fastest decoder.

  • Dav1d 0.7 Released With More Performance Optimizations

    The VideoLAN team responsible for the dav1d AV1 video decoder have just released dav1d 0.7 as the newest feature release and it comes with more performance optimizations.

    Dav1d 0.7 is bringing around 10% faster decode performance on x86_64 systems while seeing memory usage reduced as much as 25%. Additionally, dav1d 0.7 completes its Assembly code for 8-bit bit-depth content as well as introducing more AVX-512 Assembly.

  • Chromium 83 – packages for Slackware, news about Widevine plugin

    The COVID-19 crisis caused Google to change its release calendar for the Chromium browser sources, and they decided to skip the 82 release altogether, in order to focus on keeping the 81.x versions as safe as possible while working on their upcoming 83 release.

    And so this week, Chromium 83.0.4103.61 was introduced to the “Stable Channel” with lots of bugs fixed, of which 38 are security fixes. There’s also a lot of new and improved features which are introduced in this release but it seems that many of those are only available in Google’s official Chrome binaries.
    One of the notable changes for Chromium users (as opposed to Google Chrome users for which it has always worked this way) is that the Widevine content decryption module is now an official component of the browser. Like with Mozilla Firefox, the Chromium browser will now automatically download the Widevine library into your personal profile and enable access to DRM-protected content. In the URL “chrome://components/” you’ll see Widevine listed as a component, displaying its current version and a “Check for update” button.

  • TenFourFox FPR23b1 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 23 beta 1 is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). This version brings various oddiments of image tags up to spec, fixing issues with broken or misdimensioned images on some sites, and also has a semantic upgrade to Content Security Policy which should fix other sites but is most important to me personally because now TenFourFox can directly talk to the web BMC interface on Raptor Talos II and Blackbird systems -- like the one sitting next to the G5. There is also a minor performance tweak to JavaScript strings and the usual security updates. Assuming no major issues, FPR23 should go live on or about June 2nd.

  • 6 ways to optimize your innovation spend

    “Innovation happens at the intersection of functions; it organically comes from people closest to a problem,” says Red Hat CIO Mike Kelly. That’s one reason why he co-locates some of his technology staff with the business units they support.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Accessibility, Net Neutrality, AMP and Rust

  • Mozilla Accessibility: Broadening Our Impact

    Last year, the accessibility team worked to identify and fix gaps in our screen reader support, as well as on some new areas of focus, like improving Firefox for users with low vision. As a result, we shipped some great features. In addition, we’ve begun building awareness across Mozilla and putting in place processes to help ensure delightful accessibility going forward, including a Firefox wide triage process. With a solid foundation for delightful accessibility well underway, we’re looking at the next step in broadening our impact: expanding our engagement with our passionate, global community. It’s our hope that we can get to a place where a broad community of interested people become active participants in the planning, design, development and testing of Firefox accessibility. To get there, the first step is open communication about what we’re doing and where we’re headed.

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Next Steps for Net Neutrality

    Two years ago we first brought Mozilla v. FCC in federal court, in an effort to save the net neutrality rules protecting American consumers. Mozilla has long fought for net neutrality because we believe that the internet works best when people control their own online experiences. Today is the deadline to petition the Supreme Court for review of the D.C. Circuit decision in Mozilla v. FCC. After careful consideration, Mozilla—as well as its partners in this litigation—are not seeking Supreme Court review of the D.C. Circuit decision. Even though we did not achieve all that we hoped for in the lower court, the court recognized the flaws of the FCC’s action and sent parts of it back to the agency for reconsideration. And the court cleared a path for net neutrality to move forward at the state level. We believe the fight is best pursued there, as well as on other fronts including Congress or a future FCC. Net neutrality is more than a legal construct. It is a reflection of the fundamental belief that ISPs have tremendous power over our online experiences and that power should not be further concentrated in actors that have often demonstrated a disregard for consumers and their digital rights. The global pandemic has moved even more of our daily lives—our work, school, conversations with friends and family—online. Internet videos and social media debates are fueling an essential conversation about systemic racism in America. At this moment, net neutrality protections ensuring equal treatment of online traffic are critical. Recent moves by ISPs to favor their own content channels or impose data caps and usage-based pricing make concerns about the need for protections all the more real.

  • Frédéric Wang: Contributions to Web Platform Interoperability (First Half of 2020)

    Web developers continue to face challenges with web interoperability issues and a lack of implementation of important features. As an open-source project, the AMP Project can help represent developers and aid in addressing these challenges. In the last few years, we have partnered with Igalia to collaborate on helping advance predictability and interoperability among browsers. Standards and the degree of interoperability that we want can be a long process. New features frequently require experimentation to get things rolling, course corrections along the way and then, ultimately as more implementations and users begin exploring the space, doing really interesting things and finding issues at the edges we continue to advance interoperability. Both AMP and Igalia are very pleased to have been able to play important roles at all stages of this process and help drive things forward. During the first half of this year, here’s what we’ve been up to…

  • Community crossover, Rust at CNCF, and more industry trends

    The impact: The Rust community has a reputation of welcoming loveliness; increased overlap in the Rust and CNCF Venn diagrams is a harbinger of good things for both communities.

Videos: Software Freedom, OpenSUSE 15.2, "Rolling Rhino" and Linux Headlines

Games: Oxygen Not Included, Proton, GDScript

  • The first DLC for Oxygen Not Included sounds huge, free update soon too

    Klei Entertainment have been busy working behind the scenes on the next free update and first expansion for Oxygen Not Included and they've detailed what's coming. First, the free update coming within the next few days should fix plenty of issues, including one involving infinite digging which sounds annoying. More exciting is the DLC though, it's sounding like it's going to be massive!

  • VKD3D-Proton is the new official Direct3D 12 to Vulkan layer for Proton

    VKD3D was originally a project created directly by the Wine team, the compatibility layer that Proton is built upon. However, the original founder passed away and it seems Valve-funded developers are taking the torch to push it much further. It's actually been a thing for a while but today they adjusted the name of their project as VKD3D-Proton, to give it some official status plus preventing any naming conflicts elsewhere and just be clear about their goals. They're going for supporting the "full" Direct3D 12 API on top of Vulkan, with an aim of both performance and compatibility using modern Vulkan extensions and features, so this comes at the expense of compatibility with older drivers and GPUs. They're also not looking to keep backwards compatibility with the original vkd3d.

  • GDScript progress report: Type checking is back

    After completing the new tokenizer and parser as mentioned in the previous reports, I started working on the code analyzer, which is responsible for type checking and also for used for other features like warnings and some optimizations. This was done before as a second pass inside the parser but it was now moved to another class to make it clear that it doesn't happen at the same pass thus avoiding issues with functions being called out of order (which happened by a few contributions that missed this detail).

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