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Ubuntu 20.10 Release Date & Planned Features (Continually Updated)

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Ubuntu

Now, admittedly, it’s only May; development of this release (which is codenamed ‘Groovy Gorilla’) is still in the early stages. But already know a few things about what to expect, when Ubuntu 20.10 will be released, how long it’ll be supported for, and even a few of the features devs are hoping to sneak in.

So keep reading to learn everything you need to know about Ubuntu 20.10 features, changes and improvements. And since this post is updated regularly throughout development why not bookmark it now to come check back and keep tabs on the progress!

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Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS (Focal Fossa) Slated for Release on July 23rd

  • Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS (Focal Fossa) Slated for Release on July 23rd

    While many of you out there are still digging out all the cool new features of the recent Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system or just barely took the wraps off it, the Ubuntu development team are working hard to bring you the next point release.

    Yes, I’m talking about Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS, the first point release of the Focal Fossa series, which will pack all the latest security fixes and software updates to provide the community with an up-to-date installation media.

Ubuntu 20.04 is right around the corner with many new features

  • Ubuntu 20.04 is right around the corner with many new features

    Ubuntu 20.04 – codenamed “Focal Fossa” – is set for its final stable release on April 23, with the new software version brining a number of new features to the OS, including WireGuard VPN.

    Ubuntu 20.04 is a long term support (LTS) version of the operating system, meaning that it will be supported for the next 5 years to come. As usual, the new version introduces some features to the benefit of its users – with some features being more exciting than others. One of the more exciting new features is the inclusion of WireGuard – a simple, fast and modern VPN that has the backing of Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux.

Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS Coming on July with Fixes Packed

  • Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS Coming on July with Fixes Packed

    The first point release of the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is planned for release on July 2020. Ubuntu 20.04 LTS “Focal Fossa” released a while back and it was huge. The reason being are the performance improvements, stability, lots of features, latest drivers, and hardware support – all on the very positive side from the user perspective. At least, that’s what the post-release feedback from around the world says.

    [...]

    Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is supported until April 2025 bing a long term release and expected to get six point releases like this in its life span.

    If you are currently running Ubuntu 20.04 LTS focal fossa – you will be prompted to update/upgrade when Ubuntu 20.04.1 arrives in July. And if you are still deciding to update or upgrade, I would suggest you can wait till July 2020 to get the latest packages afresh.

First Ubuntu 20.04 Point Release Arrives July 23

  • First Ubuntu 20.04 Point Release Arrives July 23

    But the upcoming release is not totally lacking in interest.

    From July 23 users of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will finally be notified that ‘a newer version of Ubuntu is available’ and, if they wish to upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, be able to do so.

    Ubuntu LTS releases only check for new LTS releases by default, and even then only “see” a new release once the first point release is made available.

    Why? Because LTS releases are about stability above all else. In a 5 year LTS cycle it’s not a huge issue to wait a couple of extra months. This way, users can be sure any early-bird bugs have been spotted, swooped on, and chowed down!

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