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Games: The Universim, Artifact 2.0 and Lots More

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Gaming
  • Prepare for toxic rain and lots of fire in The Universim

    The Universim, the game that mixes in a god sim with a city-builder has expanded once again and in quite a big way with the environment.

    Crytivo's "new breed" of god game certainly isn't boring, and now your decisions make even more of an impact on the environment when you're building up your civilization. You now have to deal with toxic rain, polluted water and more if you let the environment start getting ruined. Since it's something of a god game though, your god powers can help you avert a true disaster if you have enough god points stored up. This is part of their ongoing attempts to make The Universim a lot more dynamic.

  • Humble has a big Spring Sale Encore, save on Humble Choice

    Humble Bundle announced they're doing a little encore of their Spring Sale for this weekend and there's some pretty huge discounts going on some great games.

    Their monthly Humble Choice bundle has it's own special deal going too, for new subscribers you can now get 40% off the price of the Premium plan (the top tier of it). This brings the price down from £15.99 / $19.99 to £8.99 / $12 a month which is good value.

  • You can sign up for the Artifact 2.0 Beta now, plus a video

    Valve have opened up the process to get into the Beta for Artifact 2.0, the revamp of their failed competitive card game.

    They already blogged before about what they will be doing, with people who purchased before March 30 having priority but we didn't know exactly how they will do it. Now we do! They've put up a page on the official Artifact website where you can login with Steam and put yourself into the draw for access to the 2.0 Beta. It's a nice simple process at least.

  • Stylish literary mystery Sarawak will be in the Steam Game Festival

    We have another confirmed game that will have a Linux demo available for the Steam Game Festival, and it's the very clever and stylish looking interactive fiction Sarawak.

    It was announced only recently and covered here on GOL back in April, with a curious setting split between Oxford and Borneo. They announced yesterday on Twitter, that they will also be putting up a demo for the SGF that runs between June 9 -15.

  • The Steam Spring Cleaning event is up to get you to play your old games

    Surprisingly, Valve are running an event that is not trying to get you to buy new games. To be fair though, it's not the first time. The Steam Spring Cleaning 2020 event is now live.

    Running from now until May 28, the idea is to get you to play through your existing games and clear out your backlog. This links in with their recent Play Next feature to suggest games to you, which graduated from Steam Labs to appear on the Steam Store and as a shelf in your Steam Library. It also pulls in Remote Play Together, for games to share online with friends.

  • Spaceship colony sim Space Haven arrives in Early Access

    Build a spaceship, look after your crew and travel the stars in Space Haven as it's now available in Early Access and it's good.

    Embark on a space voyage with your ragtag crew of civilians in search of a new home. Build spaceships tile by tile, create optimal gas conditions, manage the needs and moods of their crew, encounter other space-faring groups, and explore the universe in this spaceship colony sim.
    The developer, Bugbyte, ran a successful Kickstarter campaign little over a year ago to raise $260,189. Since then they've been pushing out Alpha builds to backers, and they provided us with an early copy too. Many builds later, many hours played and it's clearly shaping up to be an impressive game.

Pawnbarian turns Chess into a card-based roguelike

  • Pawnbarian turns Chess into a card-based roguelike

    Originally a short web-version you could have tried on itch.io, it's now becoming a much bigger game that's getting a proper desktop release. The developer sent word to us on Twitter about the demo now being on Linux, so I took a look to see what all the fuss is about. After playing it for a couple of hours I'm completely hooked in.

    It's incredibly clever, quite simple but also thoroughly entertaining. Each level is a dungeon crawling puzzle, and you know where you don't want to end the turn as it tells you where you will get damage so it's up to you to use your cards to get in, do some damage and get out.

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Mozilla: Accessibility, Net Neutrality, AMP and Rust

  • Mozilla Accessibility: Broadening Our Impact

    Last year, the accessibility team worked to identify and fix gaps in our screen reader support, as well as on some new areas of focus, like improving Firefox for users with low vision. As a result, we shipped some great features. In addition, we’ve begun building awareness across Mozilla and putting in place processes to help ensure delightful accessibility going forward, including a Firefox wide triage process. With a solid foundation for delightful accessibility well underway, we’re looking at the next step in broadening our impact: expanding our engagement with our passionate, global community. It’s our hope that we can get to a place where a broad community of interested people become active participants in the planning, design, development and testing of Firefox accessibility. To get there, the first step is open communication about what we’re doing and where we’re headed.

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Next Steps for Net Neutrality

    Two years ago we first brought Mozilla v. FCC in federal court, in an effort to save the net neutrality rules protecting American consumers. Mozilla has long fought for net neutrality because we believe that the internet works best when people control their own online experiences. Today is the deadline to petition the Supreme Court for review of the D.C. Circuit decision in Mozilla v. FCC. After careful consideration, Mozilla—as well as its partners in this litigation—are not seeking Supreme Court review of the D.C. Circuit decision. Even though we did not achieve all that we hoped for in the lower court, the court recognized the flaws of the FCC’s action and sent parts of it back to the agency for reconsideration. And the court cleared a path for net neutrality to move forward at the state level. We believe the fight is best pursued there, as well as on other fronts including Congress or a future FCC. Net neutrality is more than a legal construct. It is a reflection of the fundamental belief that ISPs have tremendous power over our online experiences and that power should not be further concentrated in actors that have often demonstrated a disregard for consumers and their digital rights. The global pandemic has moved even more of our daily lives—our work, school, conversations with friends and family—online. Internet videos and social media debates are fueling an essential conversation about systemic racism in America. At this moment, net neutrality protections ensuring equal treatment of online traffic are critical. Recent moves by ISPs to favor their own content channels or impose data caps and usage-based pricing make concerns about the need for protections all the more real.

  • Frédéric Wang: Contributions to Web Platform Interoperability (First Half of 2020)

    Web developers continue to face challenges with web interoperability issues and a lack of implementation of important features. As an open-source project, the AMP Project can help represent developers and aid in addressing these challenges. In the last few years, we have partnered with Igalia to collaborate on helping advance predictability and interoperability among browsers. Standards and the degree of interoperability that we want can be a long process. New features frequently require experimentation to get things rolling, course corrections along the way and then, ultimately as more implementations and users begin exploring the space, doing really interesting things and finding issues at the edges we continue to advance interoperability. Both AMP and Igalia are very pleased to have been able to play important roles at all stages of this process and help drive things forward. During the first half of this year, here’s what we’ve been up to…

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Games: Oxygen Not Included, Proton, GDScript

  • The first DLC for Oxygen Not Included sounds huge, free update soon too

    Klei Entertainment have been busy working behind the scenes on the next free update and first expansion for Oxygen Not Included and they've detailed what's coming. First, the free update coming within the next few days should fix plenty of issues, including one involving infinite digging which sounds annoying. More exciting is the DLC though, it's sounding like it's going to be massive!

  • VKD3D-Proton is the new official Direct3D 12 to Vulkan layer for Proton

    VKD3D was originally a project created directly by the Wine team, the compatibility layer that Proton is built upon. However, the original founder passed away and it seems Valve-funded developers are taking the torch to push it much further. It's actually been a thing for a while but today they adjusted the name of their project as VKD3D-Proton, to give it some official status plus preventing any naming conflicts elsewhere and just be clear about their goals. They're going for supporting the "full" Direct3D 12 API on top of Vulkan, with an aim of both performance and compatibility using modern Vulkan extensions and features, so this comes at the expense of compatibility with older drivers and GPUs. They're also not looking to keep backwards compatibility with the original vkd3d.

  • GDScript progress report: Type checking is back

    After completing the new tokenizer and parser as mentioned in the previous reports, I started working on the code analyzer, which is responsible for type checking and also for used for other features like warnings and some optimizations. This was done before as a second pass inside the parser but it was now moved to another class to make it clear that it doesn't happen at the same pass thus avoiding issues with functions being called out of order (which happened by a few contributions that missed this detail).

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