Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux 5.7 RC7 and Torvalds Moves to AMD

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.7-rc7
    So if rc6 was a bit bigger than I would have liked, rc7 looks very
    normal. Not the smallest we've had, not the largest. It's right in the
    middle of the pack.
    
    And none of the fixes look like there's anything particularly scary
    going on. Most of it is very small, and the slightly larger patches
    aren't huge either and are well-contained (the two slightly larger
    patches are to s390 and rxrpc - and even those patches aren't really
    all _that_ big).
    
    Other than that, it's mostly drivers (gpu and networking stand out,
    but small stuff in various other drivers) and some misc small patches
    all over.
    
    So it looks like I was worried for nothing last rc. Of course,
    anything can still change, but everything _looks_ all set for a
    regular release scheduled for next weekend. Knock wood.
    
    Most of the discussion I have seen has already been about various
    cleanups and new features for 5.8, and I have one early pull request
    already pending.
    
    In fact, the biggest excitement this week for me was just that I
    upgraded my main machine, and for the first time in about 15 years, my
    desktop isn't Intel-based. No, I didn't switch to ARM yet, but I'm now
    rocking an AMD Threadripper 3970x. My 'allmodconfig' test builds are
    now three times faster than they used to be, which doesn't matter so
    much right now during the calming down period, but I will most
    definitely notice the upgrade during the next merge window.
    
    Anyway, go out and give this a good final test so that we won't have
    any unhappy surprises after 5.7 is released..
    
                 Linus
    
  • Linux 5.7-rc7 Kernel Released With It Looking To Be In Good Shape

    While last week's Linux 5.7-rc6 kernel was quite big, Linux 5.7-rc7 is out today and it's on the smaller side of things in reassuring Linus Torvalds that the stable release of this kernel can happen soon.

    Linus Torvalds noted in this evening's 5.7-rc7 announcement, "rc7 looks very normal. Not the smallest we've had, not the largest. It's right in the middle of the pack. And none of the fixes look like there's anything particularly scary going on. Most of it is very small, and the slightly larger patches aren't huge either and are well-contained (the two slightly larger patches are to s390 and rxrpc - and even those patches aren't really all _that_ big)."

  • Linus Torvalds Switches To AMD Ryzen Threadripper After 15 Years Of Intel Systems

    An interesting anecdote shared in today's Linux 5.7-rc7 announcement is word that Linux and Git creator Linus Torvalds switched his main rig over to an AMD Ryzen Threadripper.

    At least for what he has said in the past, Linus has long been using Intel boxes given his close relationship with the company (and even close proximity to many of the Intel Portland open-source crew). In fact, he commented this is the first time in about fifteen years not using an Intel system as his primary machine.

  • Linux-creator Linus Torvalds joins Linus Sebastian of Linus Tech Tips in embracing AMD over Intel

    I have long been an AMD "fanboy," usually choosing that company's processors for my PC builds. Why? I prefer value to just throwing cash at raw performance, and with AMD I have always gotten plenty of power for my money. Historically, on the higher-end, Intel used to beat AMD regularly, but nowadays, things have really changed. AMD often destroys the competition across the board, as Intel has grown quite stale. Are Intel chips bad now? Not at all, but the innovation is coming from AMD. Facts.

    And so, I was quite delighted when Linus Sebastian of YouTube channel Linus Tech Tips (of whom I am a big fan) saw the light and began embracing AMD lately (despite his love for Intel). It was very neat to see AMD Ryzen and Ryzen Threadripper processors being heralded by someone who is typically an Intel guy. Believe it or not, yet another Linus (no, not Linus van Pelt from Peanuts) is jumping to AMD, and this time it is probably a bigger deal than Sebastian's current change of allegiance. You see, Linus Torvalds, the father of Linux, is no longer using an Intel CPU on his main computer. Woah.

Simon Sharwood, The Register, About Torvalds Leaving Intel

  • Linus Torvalds Dumps Intel For 32-core AMD Ryzen On His Personal PC

    Linus Torvalds released Linux 5.7 rc7 today, saying it "looks very normal... none of the fixes look like there's anything particularly scary going on."

  • Linus Torvalds drops Intel and adopts 32-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper on personal PC

    Linux overseer Linus Torvalds has binned Intel on his personal PC and hinted that he hopes to one day run an ARM-powered desktop.

    In his weekly State of the Kernel post Torvalds released Linux 5.7 rc7, said the development process has been smooth and commented said “Of course, anything can still change, but everything _looks_ all set for a regular release scheduled for next weekend. Knock wood.”

    [...]

    AMD will be over the moon that two high-profile IT pros have adopted their kit to work on the Linux kernel.

    Others will cling to the notion that Torvalds expects to one day run an ARM-powered desktop. Perhaps his remarks even mean that when the mythical Year Of Linux On the Desktop comes about it will be the Year of Linux On The ARM Desktop too.

Linux chief says he's picking AMD over Intel

  • Linux chief says he's picking AMD over Intel

    Linux overseer Linus Torvalds has revealed he has replaced the Intel processor on his PC with the 32-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970x.

    Furthermore, he dropped hints that he hopes to someday have an ARM-powered system.

    In his weekly State of the Kernel blog post, Torvalds announced that the development process of the Linux 5.7 rc7 has been hassle-free and smooth, and that a regular release looks on the cards for next week.

    [...]

    Whatever the case, Torvalds’ system processor has more cores than any currently offered by Intel.

Linux Creator Linus Torvalds Ditches Intel CPU Over AMD...

  • Linux Creator Linus Torvalds Ditches Intel CPU Over AMD Threadripper

    A few days ago, with the release of Linux Kernel 5.7-rc7, Linus Torvalds shared his biggest excitement of the week. After a long span of 15 years, he has finally upgraded his personal desktop, replacing his previous Intel CPU with the AMD Threadripper 3970x.

    Linus further confirmed that he has not yet switched to ARM, rather he has only dropped his Intel-based CPU to adopt AMD. However, in 2015 while expressing his views on security and the future of ARM-powered laptops, Linus affirmed having a machine with an ARM in the coming year.

Linus Torvalds Now Uses AMD instead of Intel

  • Linus Torvalds Now Uses AMD instead of Intel



    Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux and Git now uses AMD box as his main rig for work instead of an Intel one.

    During the Linux Kernel 5.7 rc7 announcement, Linus mentioned his primary machine.

Linux Founder Switches Allegiance To AMD

  • Linux Founder Switches Allegiance To AMD After 15 Years As Intel Customer

    Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMD) has made strong inroads into the CPU processor market following the launch of the Ryzen series in 2017. Companies and tech leaders are also gravitating toward AMD, as its processors boast a superior price-to-performance ratio.

    More recently, Linux open source operating system founder Linus Torvalds has said he is ditching Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC), which was his processor for a one-a-half decades, and is switching over to AMD.

    "In fact, the biggest excitement this week for me was just that I upgraded my main machine, and for the first time in about 15 years, my desktop isn't Intel-based," Torvalds said while announcing Linux 5.7-rc7 kernel.

Look what's inside Linus Torvalds' latest Linux development PC

  • Look what's inside Linus Torvalds' latest Linux development PC

    In a Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML), Linus Torvalds, Linux's top developer, talked about the latest progress in the next version of Linux: Linux 5.7-rc7. Along the way, he mentioned, "for the first time in about 15 years, my desktop isn't Intel-based." In his newest development box, he's "rocking an AMD Threadripper 3970x." But a computer is more than just a processor no matter how speedy it is, so I talked with Torvalds to see exactly what's in his new box.

SJVN again, focusing not on kernel RC but Torvalds

  • You can build Linus Torvalds' PC: Here's all the hardware and where to buy it

    Linus Torvalds is the most famous programmer in the world, father of the Linux operating system. and maker of the near-universal Git distributed version control system. He also builds his own developer workstation and recently upgraded his PC to a speedy AMD Threadripper 3970x-based processor. But a computer is more than a CPU.

Linus Torvalds Reveals Everything About His New Linux Computer

  • Linus Torvalds Reveals Everything About His New Linux Computer System

    While choosing a new Linux desktop or computer hardware, we always search and ask for advice if anyone can recommend the best setup for us. But have you ever wondered if you could build your Linux PC like the one the father of Linux uses?

    If you really admire Linux founder Linus Torvalds and want a PC with similar specifications, you’re now all set to go. Yes, in the latest exclusive conversation with Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols from ZDNet, Linus disclosed all his PC hardware specs and Linux desktop information. So, let’s get to know how to build Linus Torvalds’s like PC.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Interview – NXP Linux BSP and Timesys Vigiles Maintenance Service & Security Updates

I’ve been interviewing Ed White, Manager of NXP’s Professional Support and Engineering Services, and Akshay Bhat, Director of Engineering, Security Solutions at Timesys by email to find out more about NXP Linux BSP development process, and how Timesys can help to keep it updated and secure with its Vigiles service. Read more

Screen Zoom and Mouse Indicator on Ubuntu 20.04

Ubuntu can help you to enlarge screen items and easily display cursor movements to your audience. This article is a company to Focal For Teachers and continuation to Screen Zoom on KDE. This is practicable to every GNOME operating system not only Ubuntu but also Fedora, Red Hat, Zorin and others. You can watch practical examples in this new video below and also image editing videos I published recently. For teachers and tutorial makers, this article is for you. Enjoy! Read more

Python Programming

  • Find the coefficients of the Quadratic Equation of the given two roots with Python

    In this example, you are expected to find the coefficients of the quadratic equation of the given two roots (x1 and x2) with a python function. The Quadratic Equation looks like this ax^2 + bx + c = 0. Our mission is to find the coefficients of the equations which is a, b, and c. The return type from the function is a Vector containing coefficients of the equations in the order (a, b, c). Since there are infinitely many solutions to this problem, we fix a = 1. Below is the method to find the return Vector.

  • Episode #188: Will the be a "switch" in Python the language?
  • Python 3.9.0b4

    Python 3.9 is still in development. This release, 3.9.0b4, is the fourth of five planned beta release previews. Beta release previews are intended to give the wider community the opportunity to test new features and bug fixes and to prepare their projects to support the new feature release.

  • Python 3.9.0b4 is now ready for testing

    On behalf of the entire Python development community, and the currently serving Python release team in particular, I’m pleased to announce the release of Python 3.9.0b4.

  • 10 most useful Python Dictionary Methods

    Dictionary is used in python to store multiple data with key-value pairs. It works like an associative array of other programming languages. The curly ({}) brackets are used to define a dictionary and the key-value is defined by the colon(:). The content of the key and value can be numeric or string. Python has many built-in methods to do different types of tasks on the dictionary data such as add, update, delete, search, count, etc. 10 most useful dictionary methods of python are explained in this article.

  • 10 most useful Python String Methods

    The string data is the characters of an array that contains one or more characters as value for any programming language. All printable characters such as alphabets, numbers, special characters, etc. are commonly used in the string data. ASCII code and Unicode are mainly used for converting any character to a number that the computer can understand. Python uses Unicode characters for string data. We need to perform different types of tasks based on the programming purpose on the string data such as searching the particular character or characters, capitalizing the first character, making all characters uppercase, etc. Python has many built-in string methods to do these types of tasks very easily. The 10 most useful python string methods are explained in this article.

Shell/Bash Picks