Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software: ledger2beancount, TenFourFox, KDE Itinerary, GCompris

Filed under
Software
  • Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.2 released

    I released version 2.2 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter.

  • TenFourFox FPR23 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 23 final is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). This blog post was composed in the new Blogger interface, which works fine but is slower, so I'm going back to the old one. Anyway, there's no difference from the beta except for outstanding security fixes and as usual, if all goes well, it will go live Monday evening Pacific time.

  • April/May in KDE Itinerary

    It has been a busy two month since the last report again, KDE’s source code hosting is now using Gitlab, we got the 20.04 release out, notifications were significantly improved, and we are now leveraging OpenStreetMap in more places, with even more exciting things still to come. The global travel restrictions have been hampering field testing, but they have most certainly not slowed down the development of KDE Itinerary!

  • GSoC’20 Wrapping up Community Bonding Period

    As the coding period of GSoC is going to begin in the next 2 days. In this blog, I am going to write all about what I did during the community bonding period.

    During this period I have interacted with my mentors and finalized the multiple datasets of a few activities. Recently, the GCompris project has been moved to GitLab so I set up my account over there and also asked my mentors how can I push my branches to the server and everything else. I have also gone through the code of the memory activities and planned about the resources I will be using. I have also set up my environment as to how to test the GCompris on the android platform. I plan to start my work with the enumeration memory game activity so I have created a branch for it and pushed it to the server.

More in Tux Machines

KDE and LibreOffice GSoC

  • Week 4 and 5: GSoC Project Report

    This is the report for week 4 and week 5 combined into one because I couldn’t do much during week 4 due to college tests and assignments, so there was not much to report for that week. These two weeks I worked on implementing interactions between the the storyboard docker and timeline docker (or the new Animation Timeline docker). Most of the interactions from the timeline docker to the storyboard docker are implemented.

  • Cantor - Plots handling improvments

    this is the third post about the progress in my GSoC project and I want to present new changes in the handling of the external packages in Cantor. The biggest changes done recently happened for Python. We now properly support integrated plots created with matplotlib. Cantor intercepts the creation of plots and embedds the result into its worksheet. This also works if multiple plots are created in one step the order of plots is preserved. Also, text results between plots are also supported.

  • Google Summer of Code 2020 - Week 4

    According to my GSoC proposal, I should be done with the general purpose graph layout capabilities for Rocs and free to start working on layout algorithms specifically designed to draw trees. This is not the case for a series of reasons, including my decision to write my own implementation of a general purpose force-based graph layout algorithm and failure to anticipate the need for non-functional tests to evaluate the quality of the layouts. I still need to document the functionalities of the plugin and improve the code documentation as well. Besides that, although it is not present in my original purpose, I really want to include the layout algorithm presented in [1], because I have high expectations about the quality of the layouts it can produce. [...] By taking advantage of the properties of trees, even simple solutions such as my one-day experimental implementation can guarantee some desirable layout properties that the general purpose force-based layout algorithm can not. For instance, it guarantees that there are no intersections between edges or between nodes. The force-based layout algorithm I implemented can generate layouts with pairs of edges that intersect even when applied to trees.

  • Simulated Animation Effects Week#5

    I’ve started past week by going over my implementation of simulated animation effects and getting rid of the rough parts, so it would be somewhat ready to be merged into LO master. While doing so, realized I’ve forgot to add support for other types of ongoing animations in parallel with a simulated animation. So to implement this, I thought all animation instances would have a reference to box2DWorld, if box2DWorld is initiated (as in there’s a simulated animation going on), these animations would supply box2DWorld with required information on how to update shape corresponding to this animation instance. The information supplied would have the uno shape reference of that animation effect, type of the update box2DWorld will perform (change position, appear/disappear, change size etc.), and if required any additional info (for instance, if it is an path motion animation, it would supply the updated position of the shape).

Programming Leftovers (Mostly Python)

  • Introducing dwatch, the ultimate DTrace tool

    With over 3.5 years of development time and over 16 rounds of refactoring and enhancement, my tool dwatch for DTrace has reached maturity and is quickly becoming the new hip tool for all your monitoring tasks. I would like to show you how to do everything from watching the system process scheduler in realtime to filtering out filesystem events.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSimdJson 0.1.0: Now on Windows, With Parsers and Faster Still!

    A smashing new RcppSimdJson release 0.1.0 containing several small updates to upstream simdjson (now at 0.4.6) in part triggered by very excisting work by Brendan who added actual parser from file and string—and together with Daniel upstream worked really hard to make Windows builds as well as complete upstream tests on our beloved (ahem) MinGW platform possible. So this version will, once the builders have caught up, give everybody on Windows a binary—with a JSON parser running circles around the (arguably more feature-rich and possibly easier-to-use) alternatives. Dave just tweeted a benchmark snippet by Brendan, the full set is at the bottom our issue ticket for this release.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: AsioHeaders 1.16.1-1 on CRAN

    An updated version of the AsioHeaders package arrived on CRAN today (after a we days of “rest” in the incoming directory of CRAN). Asio provides a cross-platform C++ library for network and low-level I/O programming. It is also included in Boost – but requires linking when used as part of Boost. This standalone version of Asio is a header-only C++ library which can be used without linking (just like our BH package with parts of Boost).

  • Django Testing Toolbox

    What are the tools that I use to test a Django app? Let’s find out! You might say I’m test obsessed. I like having very high automated test coverage. This is especially true when I’m working on solo applications. I want the best test safety net that I can have to protect me from myself. We’re going to explore the testing packages that I commonly use on Django projects. We’ll also look at a few of the important techniques that I apply to make my testing experience great.

  • Adding New Columns to a Dataframe in Pandas (with Examples)

    In this Pandas tutorial, we are going to learn all there is about adding new columns to a dataframe. Here, we are going to use the same three methods that we used to add empty columns to a Pandas dataframe.

  • Pointers and Objects in Python

    If you’ve ever worked with lower-level languages like C or C++, then you may have heard of pointers. Pointers are essentially variables that hold the memory address of another variable. They allow you to create great efficiency in parts of your code but can lead to various memory management bugs. You’ll learn about Python’s object model and see why pointers in Python don’t really exist. For the cases where you need to mimic pointer behavior, you’ll learn ways to simulate pointers in Python without managing memory.

  • Python 101 – Debugging Your Code with pdb

    Mistakes in your code are known as “bugs”. You will make mistakes. You will make many mistakes, and that’s totally fine. Most of the time, they will be simple mistakes such as typos. But since computers are very literal, even typos prevent your code from working as intended. So they need to be fixed. The process of fixing your mistakes in programming is known as debugging. The Python programming language comes with its own built-in debugger called pdb. You can use pdb on the command line or import it as a module. The name, pdb, is short for “Python debugger”.

  • beagle 0.3.0

    beagle is a command line tool for querying a hound code search service such as http://codesearch.openstack.org

  • Python Flask Tutorial: How to Make a Basic Page (Source Code Included!)

    Python Flask is a crucial tool I use daily to prototype my ideas and bring a product to market faster than triditional methods like PHP or Ruby. These benefits make it the ideal tool for small teams or startups trying to get an MVP off the ground. It removes the need to worry about complexities and just focus on making cool websites. Today I am going to show you how to make a basic page in Flask and pass input back through to a Python function on the backend.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #428 (July 7, 2020)
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 6 Blog
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #6
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 5 Check-in
  • Late Weekly challenge 67 #1 only

    I wrote some library to make combination in 2013. I was overwhelming when I found this challenge but I found that it is buggy !!! I think that finding combination isn't necessarily written using recursive calling. so this is my first "working" solution.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Women In Linux Podcast

  • LHS Episode #355: Warp Two

    Hello and welcome to the 355th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts wrap up Field Day 2020 and then dive into other topics including: RSGB webinars, the WIA, the QSO Today Ham Expo, open-source COVID-19 tracking software, Linux Mint 20, ADS-B trackers for Raspberry Pi and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week out there.

  • #wiLinux Podcast: Amy Rich | Director of Engineering

    Amy Rich has been an Ops person for over 25 years at a variety of companies, helped ship Firefox to hundreds of millions of users, owned her own consulting business, helped organize multiple conferences for USENIX, and written professionally on the topic of UNIX systems administration.

  • #WOMENINLINUX Podcast: Amy Rich – Redox

    On this episode of the #WomenInLinux Podcast we have Amy Rich! [...] In her head, she frames what she loves about her job as “bringing order from chaos.” Amy values being able to use her technical and professional skills to make a positive difference in the world. These days her job title reads “Sr. Director of DevOps” at Redox. and a member of the Board of Directors of the USENIX Association. In her spare time she’s a board/card game addict, Star Wars LEGO nerd, horrible guitar player, fan of music, books, and movies, and enjoy taking pictures of the places traveled.

  • #wiLinux Podcast: Denise Barreto | Community & Leadership

    Denise W. Barreto is an entrepreneur, author and TEDx speaker with over 20 years of leadership and marketing experience across multiple industries. As founder and managing partner of Relationships Matter Now her firm serves businesses of all sizes, non-profit and government agencies who want to better leverage their relationships to grow their bottom line through strategic planning, HR system infrastructure, organizational and leader development and inclusion and diversity strategy.

  • #WomenInLinux Podcast: Lynn Langit – BigData/Cloud Architect

    Lynn Langit creates big data and cloud architectures with AWS, Microsoft, Google, and OpenStack technologies. She also works with SQL Server, MongoDB, Google Big Query, Redis, Neo4j, and Hadoop. Lynn is also the cofounder of Teaching Kids Programming, and has spoken on data and cloud technologies in many countries. She is an ACM Distinguished Speaker.

  • #WomenInLinux Podcast: Julie Gunderson – Community Manager

    Former Community Manager for Taos. Julie Gunderson is a DevOps Advocate at PagerDuty, where she works to further the adoption of DevOps best practices and methodologies. She has been actively involved in the DevOps space for over five years and is passionate about helping individuals, teams and organizations understand how to leverage DevOps and develop amazing cultures. Julie has delivered talks at conferences such as DevOpsDays, Velocity, Agile Conf, OSCON and more, as well as being community moderator at opensource.com. Julie is also a founding member and co-organizer of DevOpsDays Boise.

Hardware: Arduino Nano, Advantech and Adafruit

  • Clockception combines 24 clocks to create one clock

    What if you were to use the hands of a clock not as an individual display, but as part of an array combines together to form digits? That’s the idea behind Clockception by creator “Made by Morgan,” which utilizes 48 servo motors to drive 24 clock-like faces for an 8×3 display. The build uses an Arduino Nano and three servo driver boards to control movement, along with a DS1302 RTC module to track time. The overall clock is constructed out of stained poplar, while the dial assemblies are 3D-printed.

  • Change the volume of any app on your PC with the turn of a knob

    Overall computer volume control is important, but what if you want to get more granular, adjusting sound from various applications individually? Rather than going through a series of menus and on-screen sliders, Ruben Henares’ Maxmix lets you do this on the fly. Based on an Arduino Nano, the simple yet stylish knob takes input from an encoder and button to cycle through and select a program. Just push down and then rotate to turn the volume up or down. Want to switch from Discord to Spotify? Click it again and repeat the process.

  • Atom C3000 net appliance offers options for 10GbE, PoE, WiFi 6, and 5G

    Advantech’s fanless, -20 to 70°C tolerant “FWA-1112VC” net appliance runs Linux on an Atom C3000 with 6x GbE or 4x GbE with 2x 10GbE SFP+ ports along with optional PoE and 3x M.2 for SATA, WiFi 6, and 4G/5G. Advantech has announced a highly customizable, IP40-protected desktop networking system with extended temperature support. The FWA-1112VC is described in the Electropages story where we found out about it as the latest in the company’s “entry and mid-level white boxes for SD-WAN and uCPE.”

  • QuickFeather Board is Powered by QuickLogic EOS S3 Cortex-M4F MCU with embedded FPGA (Crowdfunding)

    Yesterday, I wrote about what I felt what a pretty unique board: Evo M51 board following Adafruit Feather form factor, and equipped with an Atmel SAMD51 Cortex-M4F MCU and an Intel MAX 10 FPGA. But less than 24 hours later, I’ve come across another Adafruit Feather-sized Cortex-M4F board with FPGA fabric. But instead of using a two-chip solution, QuickLogic QuickFeather board leverages the company’s EOS S3 SoC with a low-power Cortex-M4F core and embedded FPGA fabric.