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Programming Leftovers

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  • Perl Weekly Challenge 62: Sort Email Addresses

    Write a script that takes a list of email addresses (one per line) and sorts them first by the domain part of the email address, and then by the part to the left of the @ (known as the mailbox).

    Note that the domain is case-insensitive, while the mailbox part is case sensitive. (Some email providers choose to ignore case, but that’s another matter entirely.)

    If your script is invoked with arguments, it should treat them as file names and read them in order, otherwise your script should read email addresses from standard input.

  • XSD2Go - Automatically generate golang xml parsers

    Most of my readers will probably have an experience with the wide spread XML applications like RSS or Atom feeds, SVG, XHTML. For those well known XML applications you will find good library encapsulating the parsing for you. You just include existing parser in your project and you are done with it. However, what would you do if you cannot use it (think of license mismatch), or what would you do if there was no parsing library at all?

    There are many XML applications around. Here comes a (probably incomplete) list of XML formats, I had to touch in my past life: Atom, DocBook, Office Open XML, OpenDocument (ODF), OSCAL, Rolie, RSS, SAML, SCAP (+dozens of sub-formats), SOAP, SVG, XMPP, Epub, WS-Policy, XHTML, XSLT.

  • 8 IT jobs in flux

    If there’s one universal piece of advice for IT professionals, it’s “don’t get too comfortable.” The role or project you were hired for may quickly evolve or even become obsolete as the technology landscape changes. Your important title, such as scrum master or agile team lead, may lose its prestige if your organization someday gives up on agile practices.

    In the ever-evolving IT industry, it’s up to individuals to stay adaptable. It’s also up to leaders to help each person on the team recognize the value they bring to the organization outside of their job description – and to reallocate, re-organize, and re-imagine talent as appropriate.

  • What is Deno? | AWS Open Source Blog

    Deno’s approach to ES Modules is generating a lot of debate around package management, especially concerning security. For example, will this prevent another left-pad incident? Regardless of your gut reaction, I highly recommend reading the docs.

    I think the explicitness of import-from-URL will make developers think carefully about dependency management; however, I suspect many teams will handle this problem similarly to how they handle npm: with lock files, proxies, and white-listed internal registries.

  • drat 0.1.6: Rewritten macOS binary support

    A new version of drat arrived on CRAN overnight, once again taking advantage of the fully automated process available for such packages with few reverse depends and no open issues. As we remarked at the last release fourteen months ago when we scored the same nice outcome: Being a simple package can have its upsides…

  • Stack Overfow Developer Survey 2020

    Ruby is now in consistent decline, I have read people linking this to Twitter moving away from Ruby on Rails. My observation is that Ruby on Rails seems to have gone out of fashion in favor of lightweight server frameworks and I would suggest that Kubernetes has sidelined Puppet, so organizations aren't bring in Ruby via apps/frameworks they want to use.

    I am curious that the Hack language (from Facebook) might be splitting the PHP community whilst PHP's killer apps are being eroded. Wordpress is still hugely popular, but in generally I observe that blogs have been replaced by social media (Facebook, Medium, etc), rather than running Wikimedia organizations seem in love with Confluence, and that SMB company websites are being captured by WIX, Shopify et al. Wikimedia was using HHVM but is not following it to Hack and Box had success with HHVM but I can't find any update.

    I think that Go is taking share from Python and somewhat Java. Google itself is using Go internally which radiates outwards in terms of mindshare of their alumni. A range of software written in Go is currently vogue (Kubernetes, Docker etc Although Docker seem to have stumbled with Docker Swarm and Redhat is shipping their own) which means it will be in organizations via that software.

  • The 14 most loved programming languages, according to a study of 65,000 developers
  • Converting snake_case keys to camelCase in Elixir

    Converting a snake_case map keys to camelCase is a pretty common task in the snake-case-style languages working with the JavaScript frontend. Here are the basics in understanding how you can convert maps to camelCase style in Elixir.

More in Tux Machines

One Day Later: Death Stranding is now Playable on Linux

Not one day has passed and the newly released PC title, Death Stranding, is playable on Linux, as spotted by Phoronix. The process won't be easy though, but then again, if you're a Linux user then the challenge of getting something working probably doesn't concern you. Of course, Death Stranding wasn't actually coded to run on Linux. Instead, to get it running you'll have to use Wine, along with Proton, the software required to play Windows games from Steam on Linux. What's new here is that the new version of Proton was released today, 5.0-10 RC, and the sole change to this version is adding support to get Death Stranding running. You'll also have to update the graphics drivers to the latest versions for this to work, and even then, your luck might be limited. In the Github page, there are mixed reports -- some users report that the game runs surprisingly well, while others' games crash when attempting to launch. Death Stranding is the latest title to come from Kojima Productions, a new game studio founded by Hideo Kojima. Kojima is the video game director responsible for the much-loved Metal Gear Solid series, right up until his departure from Konami in 2015 -- and Death Stranding is his first title since. Read more

Android Leftovers

Graphics: Intel Gen12, Navy Flounder, Sway and DRM-Next

  • Intel Gen12 Graphics Bring EU Fusion - EUs Fused In Pairs

    While we remain eager to find out more about (and benchmark) Intel Gen12 graphics in Tiger Lake and Xe discrete graphics with this generation bringing the biggest changes to the ISA since i965, Linux patches and bug reports do continue offering new tid-bits of information on Gen12. One bit that I don't believe has been reported publicly or at least not widely is that starting with Intel Gen12 graphics there is "EU Fusion" or the execution units now being paired for yielding a larger warp size.

  • "Navy Flounder" Is The Newest AMD Navi 2 GPU Being Added To The Linux Driver

    In addition to the "Sienna Cichlid" support recently published for the open-source AMD Radeon Linux kernel graphics driver, there is another new graphics processor being added to their driver: Navy Flounder. Sent out this week were patches for Navy Flounder as another Navi 2 part, Navi 22 to be exact. The patches mostly reuse the existing Sienna Cichlid code paths. The codename, like Sienna Cichlid, is the Linux naming convention currently being used by the AMD Linux team of a color followed by a fish species.

  • Sway 1.5 Wayland Compositor Released With Adaptive-Sync/VRR, New Protocols

    Sway 1.5 is out as a big feature update to this Wayland compositor inspired by the i3 window manager. A big user-facing feature with Sway 1.5 is support for Adaptive Synchronization / Variable Refresh Rate, such as AMD FreeSync. Up to now the FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync has been principally been in place for the Linux desktop when running on an X.Org session. However, Sway now supports Adaptive-Sync/VRR for reducing stuttering and tearing within games.

  • Early Intel DG1 Graphics Card Enablement Sent In To DRM-Next For Linux 5.9

    As we have been anticipating for weeks, initial (but still early) enablement of the Intel DG1 graphics card on their open-source driver stack will indeed be sent in for the upcoming Linux 5.9 cycle and is currently being queued in the DRM-Next repository. It was in late May that Intel sent out the DG1 patches to light up the graphics card on Linux and building off all the existing Gen12/Xe graphics code already mainlined within the kernel. Since then the kernel work has continued with other features getting squared away.

Record, Edit and Mix Audio Using Latest Ardour 6.2 Release

Ardour Digital Audio Workstation aka DAW application recently released the first maintenance release version 6.2 after its major release Ardour 6.0 which was released earlier. Read more