Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE and GNOME GSoC Projects (Students Introduced)

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Status report: Week 1

    Hey all! This is my first report of the project’s Coding Period.

  • Coding officially begins

    Today, the Community bonding period finally ended and GSoC’s three months coding period officially begins.

    In the last month, I made myself more familiar with git, qml and javascript. As KDE including Gcompris has been moved to Gitlab so I also changed the configuration of my local repository accordingly and tested it. I read codes of almost all the activities (hope I didn’t miss any) and I am quite comfortable with all now.

  • Basic Subtitling Support in Kdenlive – GSoC ’20

    A month ago I was selected to participate as a student in Google Summer of Code with Kdenlive. The Community Bonding period is coming to an end and the coding period will soon commence.

    In this post, I am going to talk about what the project is about, how I plan to implement it, and what all I have done in the community bonding period to ensure a smooth and bump-free coding period.

  • Chinmay Gurjar: Chapter 1: A New Tale Begins

    It was around 23:25(IST) on the 4th of May, my brother and I were glued to our phone screens, the GSoC webpage open, eagerly waiting for the results (he was visibly the more excited one). And BAM! 23:31, I saw my name on the GSoC website. Then followed a tsunami of “congratulations”. I’ve been accepted into GSoC to work with GNOME.

    I applied for the Music project under GNOME. I’ve always fancied music, making music and now I wanted to make a music player to play that music. So, when I saw the Music listed for GSoC, I knew, I just knew that it was the “one”. I started contributing to the project and made some minor fixes, here and there. Those fixes taught me a lot about open source.

  • S Sai Vineet: GSoC 2020 with GNOME: a beginning

    I have been accepted into Google Summer of Code 2020 with GNOME Foundation!
    I am grateful to my mentor albfan and the whole GNOME developer community to have helped me become capable enough to tackle this project. Can’t wait to get my hands dirty and become a strong member of the GNOME community!

  • Adwait Rawat: GSoC 2020, Let’s GO!

    On 5th May 2020, I got an email from google, stating that I got accepted as a participant for Google Summer of Code 2020. The organisation I applied to was GNOME.

    Reason being, I have been contributing to GNOME since early 2019 to various projects such as gitg, libgit2-glib, GNOME Games etc. These contributions were usually minor fixes, but ended up being very educational for someone who was new to open-source.

  • Mariana Pícolo: The beginning of a journey with GNOME on Google Summer of Code

    I'm so excited to announce that I'm being part of Summer of Code 2020 with GNOME!

    In this post, I'll talk about my experience during the student application period.

  • Nour E-Din ElNhass: The Journey Begins

    Hello everyone, This is the first post in my blog of many up coming posts that will be documenting my journey through the open source world as I’ve been accepted to GSoC internship for 2020, contributing to Gnome organization. I’ll try to document every little detail as possible to try to give the same experience I had.

    So, who am I ? you may be wondering !!

    As said on the home page, I am Nour E-Din, an undergrad student, my first contribution to and open source application was to Evolution. Evolution is the official personal information manager for GNOME.It combines e-mail, address book, calendar, task list and note-taking features. It has been maintained for years, had developed a lot and has many users who use it daily.

  • Apoorv Sachan: The first Contribution, GNOME & GSoC

    Well, why the ants ? Think teamwork, think team effort, interdependent efforts, voluntary involvement, the easy stuff, the hard stuff, the small and the large stuff, they all do it together, collectively and end up making what all of us call an ant-hill. A self sustaining ecosystem capable of supporting various ants, queen ant,the female workers, and male ants and the baby ants of-course. Who will in-turn help build a bigger ant-hill bootstrapped upon its previous design and so on into the future . . . .

    Well enough said about ants ! You get where I am going !

    This post is about how I came to contribute to an open-source project, got started on a journey I had been looking forward to since ever.

  • Nour E-Din ElNhass: The first steps

    It’s already been 3 weeks since I’ve received my acceptance email to GSoC internship. I am going to explain what progress have been made during this time and what I am willing on achieving on the upcoming days .

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Ransomware Operators Demand $14 Million From Power Company [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Available under the RaaS (Ransomware-as-a-Service) model, Sodinokibi is operated by a threat actor likely affiliated to “Pinchy Spider,” the group behind the GandCrab ransomware.

    While investigating the malware itself, AppGate discovered that it includes functionality to escalate privileges by leveraging 32-bit and 64-bit exploits for the CVE-2018-8453 vulnerability in the Win32k component of Windows.

  • MedSeg: AI(Artificial Intelligence)-based Free Online Segmentation Tool for Radiological Images

    The project is built with HTML5/ JavaScript and uses TensorFlow.js for AI. It's deployed currently on Amazon Web Services (AWS). The developers uses several open-source libraries and packages most of them are battle tested in enterprise projects here is a list of them included resources that helped in creating this project, we are really proud in Medevel to see it's listed there... [....] MedSeg is a free, openly available segmentation tool that requires little training and no prior set-up to start using. You may manually segment your images or take advantage of their developed AI-models to ease the segmentation process of your interest. MedSeg may also contribute in your own segmentation work by developing further AI-models for your need.

  • Databricks Contributes MLflow Machine Learning Platform to The Linux Foundation

    Databricks, the company behind big data processing and analytics engine Apache Spark, contributes open source machine learning platform MLflow to The Linux Foundation. The announcement was made by Matei Zaharia, the creator of Apache Spark and MLflow projects, in his keynote presentation at the recent Spark AI Summit 2020 Conference which was held as a global virtual event. MLflow was created to help data scientists and developers with the complex process of ML model development which typically includes the steps to build, train, tune, deploy, and manage machine learning models. It manages the entire ML lifecycle, from data preparation to production deployment, including experiment tracking, packaging code into reproducible runs, and model sharing and collaboration, and is designed to work with any ML library.

  • Open Source FinOps Foundation Brings New Focus to Cloud Costs
  • Firefox 80 To Support VA-API Acceleration On X11

    While recent Firefox releases have seen VA-API video acceleration working when running natively under Wayland, the Firefox 80 release later this summer will bring VA-API support by default to those running on a conventional X.Org Server. The bits are now landed that VA-API support within Mozilla's Firefox web browser should be working fine on X11.

  • Vulkan 1.2.146 Released With DirectFB Support, Extended Fragment Density Map

    The Khronos Group is celebrating the US Independence Day with the release of a new Vulkan spec. Vulkan 1.2.146 is out today with many documentation corrections/clarifications along with two new extensions.

Programming Leftovers

  • RasPi: New keyboards for Portugal, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
  • Heap Data Structure Tutorial

    Data is a set of values. Data can be collected and put in a row, or in a column, or in a table or in the form of a tree. The structure of data is not only the placement of data in any of these forms. In computing, the data structure is any of these formats, plus the relationship among the values, plus the operations (functions) perform on the values. You should already have basic knowledge on tree data structure before coming here, as the concepts there, will be used here with little or no explanation.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 67: Number Combinations and Letter Phone

    Perl does not have a built-in combinations function, but there are several modules (for example Math::Combinatorics) providing the functionality. However, this being a coding challenge, I don’t want to use a third-party ready-made solution and prefer to show a way to do it yourself. If we knew in advance how many items we want in each combination, nested loops might be the best solution. But if we want to be flexible about the number of items in each combination, then it is often simpler to use a recursive approach. Here, the combinations subroutine is recursive and is called once for every item wanted in the combination.

  • Lucky Number Per7

    I swear it was Perl 5 just a moment ago. I turned my back for all of 5 minutes ... I don't need the new features, but I don't like boilerplate and I'm happy to accommodate those who seek progress. Harking back to lessons from the past, SysAdmins of a certain age may remember the venerable a2p program for converting awk scripts to perl and the horrendous (but working) code that it produced. We had one of those running in production less than 2 years ago until I finally decided to re-write it in Modern Perl. A bit like moving house, as a community we need to face the pain every so often and address the risks and ptifalls, not as reasons to keep to the status quo, but as a checklist of problems to be solved.

  • Episode #271: Unlock the mysteries of time, Python's datetime that is!

    Time is a simple thing, right? And working with it in Python is great. You just import datetime and then (somewhat oddly) use the datetime class from that module. Oh except, there are times with timezones, and times without. And why is there a total_seconds() but not total_minutes(), hours() or days() on timedelta? How about computing the number of weeks? What if you wanted to iterate over the next 22 workdays, skipping weekends? Ok, we'd better talk about time in Python! Good thing Paul Ganssle is here. He's a core developer who controls time in CPython.

  • GSoC’20 First Evaluation

    In the last blog, I wrote about my first two weeks on the GSoC period. In this blog, I would write about the activities to which I have worked further and implemented multiple datasets. [...] Why multiple datasets to GCompris activities? As previously all of the activities were having a generalized dataset so for some of the age groups as for 3-5 yrs the activity seems quite difficult to play, and also for some of the age groups the activity seems to be quite easy. So, multiple datasets help in resolving this issue and we have multiple data for various age groups and all the activities can be more adaptive for the children.

today's howtos

Android Leftovers