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today's leftovers

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  • Finally Landed on Planet GNOME

    Should I start with a deep introduction? Not sure! Okay, let me start from my first time with Linux. I installed my first Linux when I was around 17, It was OpenSUSE. I just burned iso and booted, HAHAHA It was a magnetic disk era. After some years I was getting deep into Linux. I consider Linux as an Icecream. Lots of flavors to eat. Eat whatever you like. Or make your own flavor. 4-5 years ago I was jumping over multiple distros. I tried multiple linux distros. But now I'm settled on a custom build Debian distro. My first encounter with GNOME was on Fedora. I still love Fedora. But Debian is ultra-fast with only selected packages and easy to make its flavor. This is my short Linux story.

  • Sound Recorder to modern HIG I

    I'm back, reporting here what's done so far. I decided to post about every change in sound recorder I'm working on but most of the work was behind a scene. I mean no UI change.

    But now new changes noticeable to end-users.

    I'm also writing this development blog cause, I don't wanna give chance to other people to spread some false information about development around (Social Media, YouTube).

    If you are reading this and you are working on any GNOME project, Please take 5-6 min and write about it frequently.

    As I told I'm working on GNOME Sound Recorder, recently I changed many things in the application.

  • LibreOffice Tuesday T&T: Impress Presenter Screen

    LibreOffice Impress is a valuable presentation software, with plenty of advanced features. One of the most liked by skilled presenters is the so called Presentation Screen, which shows the current and the next slide on screen, and the notes. It helps the presenter to maintain the rythm of the presentation, and to remember the details of the talk.

    According to LibreOffice default configuration, the Presenter Screen shows only if the PC is connected to two displays. For some people this is a feature, for some others this is a bug.

  • PeaZip 7.3.1

    PeaZip is an open source file and archive manager. It's freeware and free of charge for any use. PeaZip can extract most of archive formats both from Windows and Unix worlds, ranging from mainstream 7Z, RAR, TAR and ZIP to experimental ones like PAQ/LPAQ family, currently the most powerful compressor available.

  • How CHAOSS Measures Open Source Community Health

    To learn more about the project, we spoke with Dawn Foster, Director of Open Source Community Strategy at VMware and member of the CHAOSS governing board.

    FOSSlife: Please give our readers a bit of background on the CHAOSS project. How did it originate and what are its goals?

    Dawn Foster: The community was formed as a result of a Birds of a Feather at the Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit in 2017 out of a shared desire to collaborate on ways to measure open source project health. It was officially announced as a Linux Foundation project a few months later at the LF Open Source Summit North America. The idea was to bring together several different analytics tools, like GrimoireLab and cregit, into a coordinated effort while also developing metrics definitions that could be used by any implementation.

    [...]

    Dawn Foster: Anyone can participate in the CHAOSS project! I think sometimes people think that CHAOSS is all about software development on the tools we use to gather the metrics, and while that's an important part of what we do, it isn't everything. Most of the time, the working groups are discussing and defining metrics, which is something anyone can do.

    We collaboratively work together in documents to define metrics to better understand what questions they answer and why they are important in addition to talking about what data you might need to collect. In some cases, like with many of the diversity and inclusion metrics, qualitative measurements are an important element of the metrics definitions. We need people from all backgrounds with different skills to help us define metrics in a way that is useful for a variety of people and organizations.

    In addition to the metrics, CHAOSS is a fun community of smart and welcoming people, so it's a place where you can enjoy contributing!

  • NVIDIA K8s Device Plugin for Wind River Linux

    The advent of containers has changed the way computational workloads are managed and orchestrated in modern computing environments. Given the paradigm shift towards the microservices, container orchestration has become of critical importance in today’s distributed and cloud systems [1].

    Managing edge devices on the scale of hundreds and thousands is an onerous task. Fortunately, orchestrators such as Kubernetes take the complexity out of updates, roll-backs, and more in a platform-agnostic environment. [2]. Orchestrators provide the means to manage heterogeneous edge clusters. It is necessary to not only orchestrate containers but to discover the hardware specialized devices that the containers and orchestrator can leverage. Failing to manage these resources can lead to inefficiency, time drain, concurrency issues, and more.

More in Tux Machines

Purism Announces Librem 14 Security Focused Linux Laptop to "protect your digital life".

Purism Launches Librem 14 Security-Focused Linux Laptop with a hardware kill switch for webcam, microphone, and WiFi. Read more

Slackel 7.3 Mate beta1

Slackel 7.3 Mate beta1 has been released. Slackel is based on Slackware and Salix. Includes the Linux kernel 5.4.50, Mate-1.22.1 and latest updates from Slackware's 'Current' tree. Added support to do a real installation to an external usb stick or usb ssd or usb hard disk. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Ransomware Operators Demand $14 Million From Power Company [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Available under the RaaS (Ransomware-as-a-Service) model, Sodinokibi is operated by a threat actor likely affiliated to “Pinchy Spider,” the group behind the GandCrab ransomware.

    While investigating the malware itself, AppGate discovered that it includes functionality to escalate privileges by leveraging 32-bit and 64-bit exploits for the CVE-2018-8453 vulnerability in the Win32k component of Windows.

  • MedSeg: AI(Artificial Intelligence)-based Free Online Segmentation Tool for Radiological Images

    The project is built with HTML5/ JavaScript and uses TensorFlow.js for AI. It's deployed currently on Amazon Web Services (AWS). The developers uses several open-source libraries and packages most of them are battle tested in enterprise projects here is a list of them included resources that helped in creating this project, we are really proud in Medevel to see it's listed there... [....] MedSeg is a free, openly available segmentation tool that requires little training and no prior set-up to start using. You may manually segment your images or take advantage of their developed AI-models to ease the segmentation process of your interest. MedSeg may also contribute in your own segmentation work by developing further AI-models for your need.

  • Databricks Contributes MLflow Machine Learning Platform to The Linux Foundation

    Databricks, the company behind big data processing and analytics engine Apache Spark, contributes open source machine learning platform MLflow to The Linux Foundation. The announcement was made by Matei Zaharia, the creator of Apache Spark and MLflow projects, in his keynote presentation at the recent Spark AI Summit 2020 Conference which was held as a global virtual event. MLflow was created to help data scientists and developers with the complex process of ML model development which typically includes the steps to build, train, tune, deploy, and manage machine learning models. It manages the entire ML lifecycle, from data preparation to production deployment, including experiment tracking, packaging code into reproducible runs, and model sharing and collaboration, and is designed to work with any ML library.

  • Open Source FinOps Foundation Brings New Focus to Cloud Costs
  • Firefox 80 To Support VA-API Acceleration On X11

    While recent Firefox releases have seen VA-API video acceleration working when running natively under Wayland, the Firefox 80 release later this summer will bring VA-API support by default to those running on a conventional X.Org Server. The bits are now landed that VA-API support within Mozilla's Firefox web browser should be working fine on X11.

  • Vulkan 1.2.146 Released With DirectFB Support, Extended Fragment Density Map

    The Khronos Group is celebrating the US Independence Day with the release of a new Vulkan spec. Vulkan 1.2.146 is out today with many documentation corrections/clarifications along with two new extensions.

Programming Leftovers

  • RasPi: New keyboards for Portugal, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
  • Heap Data Structure Tutorial

    Data is a set of values. Data can be collected and put in a row, or in a column, or in a table or in the form of a tree. The structure of data is not only the placement of data in any of these forms. In computing, the data structure is any of these formats, plus the relationship among the values, plus the operations (functions) perform on the values. You should already have basic knowledge on tree data structure before coming here, as the concepts there, will be used here with little or no explanation.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 67: Number Combinations and Letter Phone

    Perl does not have a built-in combinations function, but there are several modules (for example Math::Combinatorics) providing the functionality. However, this being a coding challenge, I don’t want to use a third-party ready-made solution and prefer to show a way to do it yourself. If we knew in advance how many items we want in each combination, nested loops might be the best solution. But if we want to be flexible about the number of items in each combination, then it is often simpler to use a recursive approach. Here, the combinations subroutine is recursive and is called once for every item wanted in the combination.

  • Lucky Number Per7

    I swear it was Perl 5 just a moment ago. I turned my back for all of 5 minutes ... I don't need the new features, but I don't like boilerplate and I'm happy to accommodate those who seek progress. Harking back to lessons from the past, SysAdmins of a certain age may remember the venerable a2p program for converting awk scripts to perl and the horrendous (but working) code that it produced. We had one of those running in production less than 2 years ago until I finally decided to re-write it in Modern Perl. A bit like moving house, as a community we need to face the pain every so often and address the risks and ptifalls, not as reasons to keep to the status quo, but as a checklist of problems to be solved.

  • Episode #271: Unlock the mysteries of time, Python's datetime that is!

    Time is a simple thing, right? And working with it in Python is great. You just import datetime and then (somewhat oddly) use the datetime class from that module. Oh except, there are times with timezones, and times without. And why is there a total_seconds() but not total_minutes(), hours() or days() on timedelta? How about computing the number of weeks? What if you wanted to iterate over the next 22 workdays, skipping weekends? Ok, we'd better talk about time in Python! Good thing Paul Ganssle is here. He's a core developer who controls time in CPython.

  • GSoC’20 First Evaluation

    In the last blog, I wrote about my first two weeks on the GSoC period. In this blog, I would write about the activities to which I have worked further and implemented multiple datasets. [...] Why multiple datasets to GCompris activities? As previously all of the activities were having a generalized dataset so for some of the age groups as for 3-5 yrs the activity seems quite difficult to play, and also for some of the age groups the activity seems to be quite easy. So, multiple datasets help in resolving this issue and we have multiple data for various age groups and all the activities can be more adaptive for the children.