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KDE: Manuskript, LabPlot and Krita

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  • Repo Review: Manuskript

    Manuskript is a program designed to assist with the writing of fictional stories and non-fiction papers. It allows you to easily organize all your ideas for plots, characters, and world details, create an outline, and then let you begin writing your first drafts.

    When you first launch Manuskript, you need to select which kind of project you want to create, though there isn't really that much difference between the fiction and non-fiction project types (Non-fiction projects are divided into sections rather than chapters). You can then set how many chapters you want it to have, how many scenes per chapter, and a word count goal for each scene. This can all be adjusted at a later stage from the Editor tab.

    [...]

    Manuskript is a great planning and organizing tool for writers, though it definitely seems to be intended more for fiction than non-fiction. I did unfortunately encounter a few bugs though, but the program is still fairly early in development. I'm not really much of a fiction writer myself, so I probably won't be using Manuskript that much, but I can definitely see how useful it could be for some writers.

  • Recent developments for the coming release

    Despite a very active development in the recent couple of weeks, we still need to finalize a couple of things before we can do the release for version 2.8.

    While going through the remaining issues, we found some time to work on users’ suggestions, test our nightly builds and provide feedback. We fixed several reported bugs and also implemented a couple of smaller features that were recently requested. The purpose of this short post is to update you on the latest developments.

    LabPlot supports different analysis methods, like fitting, smoothing, Fourier transformation, etc. For smoothing we recently added the calculation of rough values. The difference between the approximating smooth function and the original data is called “rough” in this context (data = smooth + rough). This is very similar to the calculation of “residuals” for the fit algorithms. In 2.8 we calculate and expose the rough values, made it possible to visualize them and to check the goodness of the smoothing process.

  • Status update: Linux

    I didn’t believe her, seeing that it only happened inside Krita. I converted Disney’s existing imageSynth2 demo and compiled it inside our toolchain to see if it was the compiler instead, but to no avail.

    Without any other options left, I jumped deep inside the rabbit hole that is SeExpr’s parser, and started by tracing the calls that yield the (truncated) constants.

    The state dump I posted before says a class called N7SeExpr211ExprNumNodeE represents them; this is just a mangled name for the ExprNumNode class. I put a breakpoint on the value() call, but the value had already been truncated. I tested with the constructor itself, but wasn’t able to get the actual value, as it’d been <optimized out> according to gdb.

More in Tux Machines

German bill provides network traffic redirection to install state trojans

Preliminary note: This post primarily affects users falling under German jurisdiction, but may apply to other countries as well, where similar laws are already in place or about to be introduced. Unfortunately, some primary sources are German only. According to current status and local knowledge, the German government is about to establish a law that provides the redirection of network traffic through a intelligence agencies' infrastructure in order to exploit security vulnerabilities and, for example, to install a certain type of malware known as Staatstrojaner (state trojans). The bill lists both end-user devices and servers as potential targets, and requires "telecommunication service providers" to establish and maintain infrastructure for transparently redirecting traffic of certain users, households, or IP addresses. "Telecommunication service providers" covers any company providing telecommunication services, thus ranging from cable, DSL or fiber providers to mail, VoIP and messaging vendors. Ultimately, even backbone providers or internet exchanges are covered by this definition. [...] The state trojan was meant to be the ultima ratio when it was introduced in 2009. It could only be used by the Federal Criminal Police Office (Bundeskriminalamt) in case of international terrorism and preventing terrorist attacks. Once such laws were introduced, governments usually get a taste for it. As of today, any police authority may use it even in cases of less severe crimes than terrorism such as counterfeiting money or violations against the Narcotics Act (Betäubungsmittelgesetz, e. g. drug consumption or trafficking). As you can see, compromising devices became increasingly common as a measure at law enforcement agencies. It is probably going to be extended to intelligence agencies within a short amount of time. For obvious historical reasons, the German state only gives certain rights to police and intelligence agencies to avoid too much power being concentrated in one organisation, which could turn it against their people. [...] At IPFire, we fight to protect your network. Frankly, this was complicated enough before governments legalised hacking by intelligence agencies. This German bill will not make anything more secure. Instead, it will turn defense against security vulnerabilities even more into an arms race. This is not an example of "the opposite of good is good intentions". This is beyond dangerous. Imagine, for example, cyber criminals or foreign intelligence agencies (ab)using that redirection infrastructure in order to deploy their malware. Perhaps they will be able to take advantage of some zero day exploits left on some servers in that infrastructure as well (the CIA suffered from a similar breach in 2017). With a blink of an eye, arbitrary malware could be placed on a significant amount of computers compromised that way. Ransomware attacks such as WannaCry or NonPetya come to mind... Imagine compromised machines being vulnerable to other attacks as well, as some security measures have been turned off. Image surveillance abuse. Imagine future governments abusing this feature for persecution of unwanted people or political opponents - with a view at current political events, one may be concerned about personal liberties being restricted. [...] We will start next week by providing advice on whom to trust and how to establish a security-focussed mindset. Afterwards, we focus on specific technical aspects and advise how to configure IPFire machines as secure as possible - as it already implements effective mitigations against those attacks. Read more

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Android Leftovers

Brume-W Pocket-Sized Wireless Gateway Runs OpenWrt or Ubuntu (Crowdfunding)

GL.iNet Brume-W (GL-MV1000W) is a “pocket-sized wireless gateway for edge computing” that supports high-speed VPN up to 280Mbps with WireGuard, AdGuard ad-blocking software (AdGuard), and Tor. The device features three Gigabit Ethernet ports and built-in 2.4 GHz WiFi 4 connectivity, but it also supports Alfa AWUS036AC and AWUS036ACS USB WiFf USB dongles for users wanting dual-band WiFi 5 (AC) networking. The router ships with OpenWrt pre-installed, but also supports Ubuntu. Read more