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Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Will Reach End of Life on July 17th, 2020

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Ubuntu

Launched last year on October 17th, Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) shipped with the Linux 5.3 kernel series, the GNOME 3.34 desktop environment, initial support for ZFS as the root file system via the installer, support for DLNA sharing, WPA3 support, as well as Yaru light and dark themes.

Since it’s not an LTS (Long Term Support) release, Ubuntu 19.10 was mainly a testbed for Canonical to try new features. This also translates to the release not having any major changes and receiving only 9 months of support.

Therefore, on July 17th, 2020, Canonical will no longer support Ubuntu 19.10. This means that they will cease to provide software updates and security fixes for the distribution.

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Ubuntu 19.10 Reaches End of Life This Month, Plan Those Upgrade

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Reaches End of Life This Month, Plan Those Upgrades Soon

    Any enthusiasts engaging on the extant edition past this date will need (read: want) to expedite plans to emigrate to the next available release, which is the fabulously fast Ubuntu 20.04 ‘Focal Fossa’.

    The Ubuntu 19.10 release arrived on October 17, 2019. As a non-LTS release it gets 9 months of on-going app updates and security patches.

    And those 9 months are almost up.

    After this date you won’t get new versions of Firefox or anything else, and many third-party developers stop building packages for unsupported Ubuntu releases.

Canonical Will No Longer Support Ubuntu 19.10 After July 17

  • Canonical Will No Longer Support Ubuntu 19.10 After July 17, 2020

    Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux, has officially announced that Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” will reach its end-of-life (EOL) on July 17, 2020. This means the Ubuntu developer team will no longer provide security patches, bug fixes, or any other updates.

    Additionally, you won’t even get updates for installed applications. In fact, you won’t be able to install new software using apt-get command without manually modifying sources.list. Hence, if you’re using v19.10, you should upgrade your system to the latest long-term release Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa.

Ubuntu 19.10 set to reach end-of-life this month

  • Ubuntu 19.10 set to reach end-of-life this month

    Canonical is set to pull the plug on Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’ some time this month. If previous release cycles are anything to go by, support could end anywhere between mid- to late-July so that gives you about a week to get ready to upgrade. If you do not upgrade, your system will not receive any new updates which could leave it open to exploitation.

    Canonical, helpfully, has put together a simple guide which will help you move from Ubuntu 19.10 to the recently released Ubuntu 20.04, while Ubuntu upgrades tend to be safe, be sure to heed the warning at the start of the tutorial about backing up your files as things could mess up, although it’s unlikely.

Ubuntu 19.10 is getting killed off on July 17

  • Ubuntu 19.10 is getting killed off on July 17 – so make sure you upgrade

    For anyone running the Ubuntu 19.10 Linux distribution, you have until July 17 to update to a newer version, as Canonical, the company behind the distro, has announced that after that date, version 19.10 (also known as “Eoan Ermine”) will enter its end of life.

    That means Ubuntu 19.10 will no longer receive important security patches, updates and fixes. Most installed applications won’t get updates, and you’ll won't be able to install new apps either.

Lubuntu 19.10 End of Life and Current Support Statuses

  • Lubuntu 19.10 End of Life and Current Support Statuses

    Lubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) was released October 17, 2019 and will reach End of Life on Friday, July 17, 2020. This means that after that date there will be no further security updates or bugfixes released. We highly recommend that you update to 20.04 as soon as possible if you are still running 19.10.

    After July 17th, the only supported releases of Lubuntu will be 18.04, with LXDE, and 20.04, with LXQt. All other releases of Lubuntu will be considered unsupported, and will no longer receive any further updates from the Lubuntu team.

    You can find instructions on how to upgrade your Lubuntu installation here at our manual page.

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