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GNOME 3.36.4 released

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GNOME

Hello,

GNOME 3.36.4 is now available. This is a stable bugfix release for
3.36. All distributions shipping GNOME 3.36 are advised to upgrade.The
GNOME 3.36 flatpak runtimes have been updated as well.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.36.3, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot:

https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.36.4/gnome-3.36.4.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.36/3.36.4/NEWS

The source packages are available here

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.36/3.36.4/sources/

Regards,

Abderrahim Kitouni
GNOME Release Team

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.36.4 Released With Faster Mutter Fix Back-Ported

GNOME 3.36.4 Brings Better Support for Sandboxed Apps

  • GNOME 3.36.4 Brings Better Support for Sandboxed Apps, Fingerprint Authentications

    GNOME 3.36.4 comes three weeks after the GNOME 3.36.3 point release and it’s here with yet another layer of bug fixes, improvements and translation updates to beef up the stability and reliability of the GNOME 3.36 desktop environment.

    Highlights of this new GNOME 3.36 point release include better support for sandboxed apps that contain multiple .desktop files, improvements to the on-screen keyboard size in portrait orientation, as well as improvements to the performance of the Calendar applet and World Clocks styling.

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