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Linux 5.8-rc5

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Linux

Ok, so rc4 was small, and now a week later, rc5 is large.

It's not _enormous_, but of all the 5.x kernels so far, this is the
rc5 with the most commits. So it's certainly not optimal. It was
actually very quiet the beginning of the week, but things picked up on
Friday. Like they do..

That said, a lot of it is because of the networking fixes that weren't
in rc4, and I'm still not hearing any real panicky sounds from people,
and things on the whole seem to be progressing just fine.

So a large rc5 to go with a large release doesn't sound all that
worrisome, when we had an unusually small rc4 that precedes it and
explains it.

Maybe I'm in denial, but I still think we might hit the usual release
schedule. A few more weeks to go before I need to make that decision,
so it won't be keeping me up at night.

The diffstat for rc5 doesn't look particularly worrisome either. Yes,
there's a (relatively) high number of commits, but they tend to be
small. Nothing makes me go "umm".

In addition to the outright fixes, there's a few cleanups that are
just prep for 5.9. They all look good and simple too.

Anyway, networking (counting both core and drivers) amounts to about a
third of the patch, with the rest being spread all over: arch updates
(arm64, s390, arc), drivers (gpu, sound, md, pin control, gpio),
tooling (perf and selftests). And misc noise all over.

The appended shortlog gives the details, nothing really looks all that
exciting. Which is just as it should be at this time.

Go forth and test.

Thanks,

                 Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 5.8-rc5 Released As A Big Kernel For This Late In The Cycle

Linus Torvalds banishes masters, slaves and blacklists

  • Linus Torvalds banishes masters, slaves and blacklists from the Linux kernel, starting now

    Linux overlord overseer principal developer Linus Torvalds has signed off on a new policy to adopt inclusive language across the project.

    A Git commit adopted changes recommended by kernel developer Dan Williams, with the result that Linux will no longer refer to masters, slaves or blacklists.

    In their place coders will be expected to use alternatives such as “primary” and “secondary” relationships, or refer to “leaders” and “followers”, or even “directors” and “performers”.

    Blacklists are to become either “denylists” or “blocklists” and whitelists will become “allowlists” or “passlists”.

    Torvalds’ commit was made on July 10th and said he thinks there’s no need for the change to wait for the next merge window for a new cut of the Linux kernel.

    Torvalds later offered his weekly state of the kernel post in which he perhaps tremulously observed that while last week’s Linux 5.8-rc4 was “small”, “now a week later, rc5 is large.”

Linux kernel will no longer use terms ‘blacklist’ and ‘slave’

  • Linux kernel will no longer use terms ‘blacklist’ and ‘slave’

    Linus Torvalds, the principal engineer of the Linux kernel, has approved new terminology for its code and documentation to promote the inclusive language. The change abolishes terms such as blacklist, master, and slave.

    There are no formal alternatives in place, but Torvalds suggested plenty of choices. Suggested replacements for master/slave are primary/secondary, controller/device, requester/responder, and main/replica.

    Alternatives for blacklist/whitelist are denylist/allowlist and blocklist/passlist.

    [...]

    In May, after George Floyd’s death in the US, a string of protests sprung up worldwide to support Black Lives Matter initiatives. In a way to show solidarity, the tech community proposed to get rid of terms such as blacklist and slave.

    Several major product and programming language teams including Twitter, Chrome, Android, Curl, Go, and Microsoft have also adopted alternative terminology.

Linux Kernel Will Stop Using ‘Master/Slave’

  • Linux Kernel Will Stop Using ‘Master/Slave’, and ‘Blacklist/Whitelist’ in Code

    Similarly, the recommended alternatives for ‘blacklist / whitelist’ are ‘denylist / allowlist’ and ‘blocklist / passlist’. As you can see, Torvalds has given developers the choice to adopt any of the suggested ones.

    “The discussion has tapered off as well as the incoming ack, review, and sign-off tags. I did not see a reason to wait for the next merge window,” reads the commit on Linux 5.8 repository.

    According to the commit, old terms will be allowed only when developers are updating code for an existing (as of 2020) hardware or protocol, or when devs are dealing with specifications that mandate those terms.

    The decision comes after Linux maintainer Dan Williams raised a proposal that read, “Recent events have prompted a Linuxposition statement on inclusive terminology. Given that Linux maintains a coding-style and its own idiomatic set of terminology here is a proposal to answer the call to replace non-inclusive terminology.”

By Corbet at LWN

  • Kernel prepatch 5.8-rc5

    The 5.8-rc5 kernel prepatch is out for testing; it's a relatively large set of changes. "Maybe I'm in denial, but I still think we might hit the usual release schedule. A few more weeks to go before I need to make that decision, so it won't be keeping me up at night."

Linus Torvalds Approves Inclusive Terminology for Linux Kernel

  • Linus Torvalds Approves Inclusive Terminology for Linux Kernel

    As reported previously, many companies and organizations are reviewing their use of racist and exclusionary language, and the Linux kernel development team has been doing the same.

    Last week, Linux creator Linus Torvalds approved an “inclusive terminology” proposal from Dan Williams for the Linux 5.8 repository, saying he “did not see a reason to wait for the next merge window."

    This change means that, going forward, Linux developers will “avoid introducing new usage” of the terms “master/slave” and ‘'blacklist/whitelist.”

Linus Torvalds Approves Using New Inclusive Terminology

  • Linus Torvalds Approves Using New Inclusive Terminology For Linux Kernel

    On July 04, 2020, Linux maintainer Dan Williams proposed new guidelines to replace non-inclusive terminology. Though Linux already has its coding style and set of terminology, the proposal came amid the ongoing Black Lives Matter movement.

    After a lengthy discussion, Linus Torvalds, creator of Linux, has finally merged the new inclusive terminology into the Linux source tree. And with the release of the latest Linux 5.8-rc5, all Linux developers are advised to avoid using ‘master/slave’ and ‘blacklist/whitelist’ terms in kernel code and documentation.

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