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PinePhone CE available for pre-order

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Linux
Gadgets

This is a follow-up to last month's PinePhone: postmarketOS community edition announcement. PINE64 and postmarketOS are teaming up to bring you the next version of this remarkable, hacker-friendly smartphone. Pre-orders are open now. Keep in mind, that you should only buy this device if you consider yourself a Linux enthusiast.

We are happy to share that in addition to the standard PinePhone CE hardware configuration, the postmarketOS CE can be ordered in an all-new Convergence Package. It comes with increased RAM (3 GB instead of 2 GB), eMMC (32 GB instead of 16 GB) and price ($199.99 instead of $149.99), as well as the nice USB-C dock seen in the picture.

Read more

Also: New PinePhone with 3GB RAM and USB Dock Goes on Sale

PinePhone Convergence Pack: Use a $200 Linux phone

  • PinePhone Convergence Pack: Use a $200 Linux phone as a desktop PC

    The folks behind the $149 PinePhone Linux smartphone have introduced a new version that’s designed to work not only as a mobile Linux device, but also as portable desktop computer.

    The new PinePhone Convergence Package is a new $200 bundle that includes a version of the smartphone with souped up specs, plus a USB-C docking station that makes it easy to connect a display, keyboard, mouse, and even Ethernet.

PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition Is Now Available

  • PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition Is Now Available to Order

    Unveiled in mid-June, the PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition is now ready for pre-order, just in time to replace the PinePhone UBports Community Edition with Ubuntu Touch, whose campaign has ended on July 13th.

    It is sad that you can’t order a PinePhone with Ubuntu Touch pre-installed, but the good news I want to share with you today is that there’s now a PinePhone edition that ships with postmarketOS and boasts 3GB of RAM instead of 2GB RAM as previous models.

Pinephone “Community Edition: PostmarketOS” Launched with 3GB

  • Pinephone “Community Edition: PostmarketOS” Launched with 3GB RAM, 32GB Flash, USB-C Hub

    After PinePhone “BraveHeart Edition” with any OS pre-installed introduced at the end of last year, Pine64 launched PinePhone “Community Edition: UBports” with Ubuntu Touch last April, and now the company is taking pre-orders for Pinephone “Community Edition: PostmarketOS with Convergence Package”.

    Besides using a different operating system, the new PinePhone also got a hardware upgrade with 3GB RAM and 32GB flash instead of the 2GB/16GB configuration from earlier models. Due to the changes and the addition of a USB-C dock for convergence, the price has also gone up from $149.99 to $199.99 with shipping scheduled to start at the end of August. If you don’t need the extra memory, storage, and convergence package, you can still pre-order PinePhone with postmarketOS for $149.99.

Linux-Based PinePhone CE With PostmarketOS Available

  • Linux-Based PinePhone CE With PostmarketOS Available For Pre-Order Now

    Last month, PINE64, a company behind PinePhone smartphones, announced that the next Community Edition (CE) of PinePhone will feature a full-fledged postmarketOS. Following the same, PINE64 has now started taking pre-orders for its new PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition (CE).

    The most interesting thing about this new model is the introduction of the PinePhone “Convergence Package.” Yes, along with its regular community edition, you can now also pre-order another variant of PinePhone CE that comes with Convergence Package.

New Pine64 phones with upgraded hardware begin shipping

  • New Pine64 phones with upgraded hardware begin shipping in August

    Yesterday, Pine64 announced the end of the PinePhone UBPorts Community Edition campaign—but more importantly, the company declared the beginning of the postmarketOS Community Edition campaign. The base version of the new run of PinePhones shares the same $149 price point and the same basic technical specs as the original developer edition—but there's also a new, upgraded "Convergence Package" available at $199.

This cheap Linux smartphone can replace your PC

  • This cheap Linux smartphone can replace your PC

    Pine64, a maker of Linux smartphones, has introduced its new PinePhone Convergence Package handset that can be used as a PC when plugged to an external display and a keyboard. The device costs just $199 and is aimed primarily at Linux enthusiasts.

    The PinePhone Linux smartphone is based on the Alpine Linux-based PostmarketOS that can be used both in smartphone and desktop modes.

This mobile with Linux can also work as a PC

  • This mobile with Linux can also work as a PC

    If you are a Linux enthusiast you surely know the PinePhone, a mobile that works with Linux instead of Android. It is not crazy, considering that Android itself is based on Linux. Its creators, Pine64, have released a special version of this mobile with Linux, which now works like a PC.

    His very long name, PINEPHONE Community Edition: PostmarketOS With Convergence Package, comes to say that it is an experimental version intended for the Linux community, since some functions are even in alpha phase.

    This PinePhone It has more memory and storage than the standard model, to be able to function as a PC, and also includes a hub that adds an HDMI connector, an Ethernet port and two USB 2.0 ports to connect the keyboard and mouse...

PINE64 Reopens Pre-Order Of $200 ARM Linux Laptop Pinebook Pro

  • PINE64 Reopens Pre-Order Of $200 ARM Linux Laptop Pinebook Pro

    In March 2020, PINE64 opened the pre-order window for its ARM-based Linux laptop Pinebook Pro. If you missed placing an order last time, you now have another chance to grab Pinebook Pro.

    Yes, PINE64, the maker of the original Pinebook Pro, has started to take the next batch of pre-orders for Pinebook Pro. Both the ISO and ANSI keyboard versions of Pinebook Pro are in stock right now and available to place an order from the official site here.

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