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System76's Keyboards for GNU/Linux

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Hardware

  • Reimagining the Keyboard

    Your keyboard is king when it comes to input. It’s responsible for your words and your code, carrying you from A to B faster than your mouse. By making the keyboard more efficient, we’ll vastly improve the way you interact with your computer. We’re approaching our keyboard in 3 different ways: Redesigning the keyboard itself, maximizing your efficiency when using it, and empowering you to fully customize your keyboard to your whims.

    [...]

    There’s nothing more enjoyable than typing on a keyboard for hours on end without hitting the wrong key. That’s why we strongly opposed adding a ‘WRONG’ key to the keyboard. That’s also why we’re sticking to 3 key sizes in the design of the keyboard: 1U (letter/number keys), 1.5U (tab keys), and 2U (shift keys). Traditional keyboards are laid out with incredibly long space bars so you can’t use your thumbs, your strongest digit, for functions other than space. Our testing revealed that most space bars are much longer than what’s necessary to reliably and consistently hit the bar, so we decided to break up the space bar into 2 2U keys. Not only did this shorten the length of the space bar and bring useful functions closer to the center of the keyboard, but this also allows you to remap another commonly-used key to where it’s easy for you to smash with your other thumb.

    The new keyboard is designed to work in harmony with Auto-Tiling on Pop!_OS. CEO Carl Richell describes his experience testing the prototype: “I’ve found using the new keyboard layouts with Auto-Tiling is so addictive that when I go to another computer, it feels like I’m in a foreign land.”

  • System76 Talks Up Their Forthcoming Linux Keyboard

    Following in the steps of their hand-crafted Thelio desktops manufactured in-house in Colorado, Linux PC vendor System76 is also working to not only manufacture their own laptops but also other components like their own keyboard.

    System76 continues ramping up their manufacturing equipment and capabilities at their Denver facility and it's looking like the premiere of their keyboard isn't far out with already having prototypes internally.

Linux PC maker System76 is designing a new customizable keyboard

  • Linux PC maker System76 is designing a new customizable keyboard

    System76 has been selling Linux laptop and desktop computers for years. But for most of that time the company has been buying OEM designs and slapping its own software on top.

    Recently System76 started designing and manufacturing its own desktop computers. And now the company is working on its own custom keyboards.

    The upcoming System76 keyboard will be designed to work with the company’s Linux-based Pop!_OS operating system with support for a variety of keyboard shortcuts. But it’s not just the software that’s customizable — the keyboard is too.

System76 Announces New Keyboard For Linux

  • System76 Announces New Keyboard For Linux With Interchangeable Keys

    For over a decade, Denver-based Linux PC vendor System76 has sold some of the best Linux laptops and desktops. As the company has already entered its Phase 3, it is now implementing what it aims — in-house product design and manufacturing.

    Starting with the in-house hand-crafted Thelio desktops, then Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS, and after announcing its own Linux laptop, System76 is now working on manufacturing its own custom keyboard.

System76 are teasing their own brand Keyboard again

  • System76 are teasing their own brand Keyboard again

    System76, the company that provides various Linux hardware along with their own Pop!_OS Linux distribution have started teasing their upcoming Keyboard again.

    Originally talked about in a blog post back in March last year, we haven't really heard much since then. Things sounded pretty experimental back then but in a fresh blog post from July 30, it seems it's moving forward.

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