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Sysadmin Appreciation Day and More Homage to Sysadmins

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GNU
Linux
Server

  • Celebrate Sysadmin Appreciation Day today

    Happy Sysadmin Appreciation Day, and thank you for all you do. When email is flowing, databases just work as they should, and the network is screaming (in a good way), you can focus on more challenging things, like how to automate tasks to make your sysadmin life easier.

    But when things break, and we know they will, it's all hands on deck to fix the problem and find the root cause, so it doesn't happen again. Sometimes, you'll find that elusive answer, and sometimes you put your hands up and move on to the next fire.

    Here at Enable Sysadmin, we're building a great community of authors who want to share their stories, their expertise, and learn from each other. In May 2020, we officially launched our Sudoers program to recognize our core contributors, and we invite you to check it out and join us.

  • Celebrate Sys Admin Appreciation Day with Special Free Issue from ADMIN Magazine

    System Administrator Appreciation Day is a special day dedicated to system administrators around the world. This year, FOSSlife and ADMIN Network & Security are partnering to provide another installment of the ADMIN "Terrific Tools" series, dedicated to the tireless professionals who keep our networks alive and well.

    Celebrate System Administrator Appreciation Day with this collection of articles on free tools for IT professionals. This special digital issue includes useful utilities that will help you search out rootkits, monitor network traffic, generate easy-to-use passwords, and much more. Bonus articles explore hidden command-line tools and describe how to find resource bottlenecks with eBPF.

  • July 31, 2020: Celebrate “System Administrator Appreciation Day” Today

    Ted Kekatos, a System Administrator by profession got inspired by an Advertisement in Hewlett-Packard Magazine where an Administrator is greeted in the form of flowers and fruit-baskets by thankful co-workers for their new printer installed.

    Kekatos idea was further recognized and promoted by lots of IT organizations and professional including the ‘League of Professional System Administrator‘, SAGE/USENIX, etc.

    The first System Administrator Appreciation Day was celebrated on July 28, 2000. And since then celebrating System Administrator Appreciation Day every year gets a worldly recognition and today we reached the figure 21st.

  • What sysadmins wish their co-workers knew about their jobs

    You have a problem, and reach out to the help desk or your friendly neighborhood admin. It's a quick fix, you're sure, but ugh they want you to file a ticket! What a pain, right? It might sound like they're giving you the cold shoulder but that's (usually) not the case. Admins want users to file tickets for a number of reasons.

    First of all, it helps them manage their time. It's hard to focus on longer projects when you are pelted with "this will just take five minutes" requests all day. Also, other people have been waiting for their ticket to be handled.

    Secondly, admins may need to account for their work and demonstrate that they are -- in fact -- busy and not just playing Doom Eternal all afternoon.

    Also, it helps keep track of problems that crop up frequently and assists with institutional memory. A well-kept ticketing system with a good search tool can help admins identify long-term problems that need fixing, and reduce the time to fix problems in the future by documenting how they were fixed today.

  • The sysadmin's journey: A series of unexpected events

    As part of the 21st annual System Administrator Appreciation Day celebration, I want to share these four pillars to help you improve your skills, just as they did with me.

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