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Linux 5.8 Released

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Linux

  • Linux 5.8
    So I considered making an rc8 all the way to the last minute, but
    decided it's not just worth waiting another week when there aren't any
    big looming worries around.
    
    Because despite the merge window having been very large, there really
    hasn't been anything scary going on in the release candidates. Yeah,
    we had some annoying noise with header file dependencies this week,
    but that's not a new annoyance, and it's also not the kind of subtle
    bug that keeps me up at night worrying about it.
    
    It did reinforce how nice it would be if we had some kind of tooling
    support to break nasty header file dependencies automatically, but if
    wishes were horses.. Maybe some day we'll have some kind of SAT-solver
    for symbol dependencies that can handle all our different
    architectures and configurations, but right now it's just a manual
    pain that occasionally bites us.
    
    Anyway..
    
    Aside from silly header file noise, the last week was mostly dominated
    by the networking pull, which accounts for about half of the changes
    (mellanox drivers and selftests stand out, but there's other smaller
    things in there too). Some RCU fixes stand out.
    
    Outside of the networking stuff, it's mostly various small driver
    fixes (gpu, rdma, sound and pinctrl being much of it), and some minor
    architecture noise (arm, x86, powerpc). But it's all fairly small.
    
    So there it is, a shiny new kernel. Give it a whirl before all you
    people start sending me the pull requests for the merge window, which
    I'll start handling tomorrow..
    
                     Linus
    
  • Linus Torvalds Officially Releases the Linux 5.8 Kernel, Now Available for Download

    The Linux 5.8 kernel series has been officially announced by Linus Torvalds.

    [...]

    You can download the Linux 5.8 kernel sources right now from the kernel.org website or using the direct link below. However, please keep in mind that this currently marked as a “mainline” kernel, which means it’s not yet ready for mass deployments or use in production environments.

    You should probably wait for the first point release, Linux kernel 5.8.1, to hit the streets before considering upgrading your kernel packages to the new series. Many of the rolling GNU/Linux distributions like Arch Linux or openSUSE Tumbleweed will probably upgrade to Linux 5.8 in the coming weeks.

  • Linux 5.8 Released With AMD Energy Driver, F2FS LZO-RLE, IBM POWER10 Booting

    Linus Torvalds was debating up to the last minutes today of whether to opt for Linux 5.8-rc8 or go ahead and release Linux 5.8 as stable... He opted for Linux 5.8 splashing down on this historic day.

    Linus wrote in the 5.8 release announcement that despite this cycle being very large, it turned out fairly well and didn't need a 5.8-rc8 release. Though due to some last minute changes, he does dream of having a sort of SAT-solver for symbol dependencies that would work across architectures and configurations for cleaning up the Linux kernel header file dependency mess. But that for now is just a dream.

  • The 5.8 kernel is out

    Linus has released the 5.8 kernel. "So I considered making an rc8 all the way to the last minute, but decided it's not just worth waiting another week when there aren't any big looming worries around." Headline features in this release include: branch target identification and shadow call stacks for the arm64 architecture, the BPF iterator mechanism, inline encryption support in the block layer, the CAP_PERFMON and CAP_BPF capabilities, a generalized kernel event-notification subsystem, the KCSAN data-race detector, and more. As always, see the KernelNewbies 5.8 page for more information.

Linux Kernel 5.8 Released, This is What’s New

  • Linux Kernel 5.8 Released, This is What’s New

    In his email announcement to the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) Linus says: “So [here] it is, a shiny new kernel. Give it a whirl before all you people start sending me the pull requests for the merge window, which I’ll start handling tomorrow.”

    Linux 5.8 will be available for testing in Ubuntu 20.10 in the near future. It’s not yet clear which Linux kernel version the final stable release of the Groovy Gorilla will ship with in October (and thus be back-ported to Ubuntu 20.04 LTS via 20.04.2 LTS) but there’s a good chance it may be this release.

More coverage

Linux Kernel 5.8 is Here. This is What’s New

  • Linux Kernel 5.8 is Here. This is What’s New

    The latest Linux Kernel 5.8 will be available via mainstream Linux distributions in Q3 and Q4 2020 releases this year. Fedora 33 which is due in October 2020, will have the Linux Kernel 5.8. Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla which is also due in Oct will have the latest Linux Kernel 5.8.

    The current long term support release of Ubuntu 20.04, will get this latest Kernel on the second point release after it is extensively tested and used in Ubuntu 20.10.

    Other Linux distributions will follow suite once Ubuntu is patched with the new Kernel.

Linux Kernel 5.8 Is Finally Available Now

You Can Now Install Linux Kernel 5.8 on Linux Lite

Linus Torvalds pines for header file fix but releases Linux 5.8

  • Linus Torvalds pines for header file fix but releases Linux 5.8 anyway

    As is usual, would-be-contributors to Linux 5.9 now have a couple of weeks to get their code into the queue for the next release.

    Google has already proposed an intriguing contribution in the form of what it’s described as “fine-grained user-space control/scheduling” code that it uses in its own systems. Google's post says "This patchset is the first step to open-source this work." The Register has asked Google how much of this system it intends to share but has not received a reply to our July 29th request at the time of writing.

Linux Kernel 5.8 Released by Amber Ankerholz

Shiny New Linux Kernel 5.8 Comes With Highest Number Of Commits

  • Shiny New Linux Kernel 5.8 Comes With Highest Number Of Commits

    After seven release candidates, Linus Torvalds recently announced the new mainline Linux Kernel 5.8. The new release succeeds the latest stable Linux Kernel 5.7 including all the changes pulled out during the kernel 5.8 merge window.

    Since Linux 5.8 received one of the highest numbers of merge requests during its merge window, Linus Torvalds dubbed it “the biggest release of all time.” Surpassing the previous record-holder Linux Kernel 4.9, 5.8 now consists of the highest number of over 17595 commits.

    However, 5.8 is not the biggest release ever in terms of file changes and new lines. For more git status on any Linux kernel, check out the data aggregated by Thorsteen Leemhuis, who is also known as “The Linux Kernel Logger.”

Install Linux Kernel 5.8 In Ubuntu / LinuxMint

Linux 5.8 released, features Thunderbolt 4.0 support

  • Linux 5.8 released, features Thunderbolt 4.0 support and improved security

    Linux's creator Linus Torvalds has released a new version of the Linux kernel following seven release candidates.

    While he did consider creating an eighth release candidate for Linux 5.8 last week, on Sunday Torvalds decided "it's not just worth waiting another week when there aren't any big looming worries around”.

    Linux 5.8 succeeds the latest stable Linux Kernel 5.7 and includes all of the changes that were pulled out during the kernel 5.8 merge windows. As Linux 5.8 received a surprisingly high number of merge requests during its merge window, Torvalds said that it is one of the biggest Linux releases yet in terms of the number of commits and close to Linux 4.9.

Top 10 New Features in Linux Kernel 5.8

  • Top 10 New Features in Linux Kernel 5.8

    Linus Torvalds recently announced the release of Linux Kernel 5.8, and he seems delighted with it. He has pointed it out as the most significant release of all time. To developers, this new kernel comes with an addition of 800,000 new code lines and more than 14,000 changed files. To the average user, you might not see many eye-candy changes, as seen in the earlier releases.

    Overall, the Linux Kernel 5.8 releases include a bunch of driver support, optimizations, processor improvements, and a variety of security enhancements. In the Linux Kernel mailing lists, Linus Torvalds wrote, “So I didn’t expect this, but 5.8 looks to be one of our biggest releases of all time.”

    Given the release timeline for Linux 5.8, it may be available for testing in distributions like Ubuntu 20.10 and Fedora 33 soon. Let’s take a look at some of the features you can expect in Linux Kernel 5.8.

Linux 5.8 launched: Linus Torvalds's 'biggest release

Kernel 5.8: Collabora's biggest & most significant contributions

  • Kernel 5.8: Collabora's biggest & most significant contributions yet!

    Earlier this week, the Linux 5.8 kernel was released. It is one of the biggest releases of all time, as if developers started to code more during the recent lockdowns across the globe. As usual, you can the find the most important changes for this release in the always great LWN.net articles - part 1 and part 2.

    According to Linus himself, the 5.8 release is big. While Collabora modestly contributed to this massive release, Linux 5.8 marks our biggest and most significant contributions yet. Everyone at Collabora has been impressed by the efforts put together by our kernel developers. Working directly upstream, contributing to the Linux kernel has long been a key objective of Collabora as an organization. Over the past decade we have been growing our participation in this essential effort that Linux is.

    The ability for a relatively small software consultancy such as Collabora to contribute at this level demonstrates a fantastic improvement in vendors' mindset when it comes to working Open First (hence Collabora's tagline). Providing mainline support out-of-box as early as possible is really becoming a priority for all our customers and we appreciate them all the more for it.

    So a big thank you to all our clients for the continued trust they are placing in Collabora. We look forward to continuing to contribute on their behalf of years to come.

Collabora’s Contributions to Linux Kernel 5.8 Were Their Biggest

  • Collabora’s Contributions to Linux Kernel 5.8 Were Their Biggest Yet

    Collabora reports today on their contributions to the latest Linux 5.8 kernel series, which is one of the biggest releases of all time according to Linus Torvalds. Collabora’s contributions to Linux kernel 5.8 would be its biggest yet too.

    Linux kernel 5.8 was released over the weekend by Linus Torvalds, after almost two months in development, which kicked off as one of the biggest releases of all time. Now, the final release is here and it turns out it’a indeed a massive update to the Linux kernel.

    Highlights include Shadow Call Stack and Branch Target Identification (BTI) support for ARM platforms, LZO-RLE compression for the F2FS file system, new boot parameter to specify the initial RAM disk image, inline encryption support in the block layer, and a new event-notification mechanism.

    Additionally, Linux kernel 5.8 features Thunderbolt 4 support, Kernel Concurrency Sanitizer (KCSAN) dynamic data race detector for kernel space, support for multiple private instances in the /proc file system, and mitigations for the SRBDS/CrossTalk hardware vulnerability.

Linux Kernel 5.8

  • Linux Kernel 5.8

    Earlier this week Linux Kernel 5.8 was released, improving stability and introducing new features.

    [...]

    I will probably upgrade Linux Mint 20.0 to Linux Kernel 5.8 over this weekend.

Why Linux’s biggest ever kernel release is really no big deal

  • Why Linux’s biggest ever kernel release is really no big deal

    When the Linux 5.8 Release Candidate opened for testing recently, the big news wasn’t so much what was in it, but its size. As Linus Torvalds himself noted, “despite not really having any single thing that stands out … 5.8 looks to be one of our biggest releases of all time.”

    True enough, RC 5.8 features over 14,000 non-merge commits, some 800,000 new lines of code, and added around a hundred new contributors. It might have gotten that large simply because few have been traveling thanks to COVID-19, and we’ve all been able to get more work done in a release window than usual. But from the perspective of this seasoned Linux kernel contributor and maintainer, what is particularly striking about the 5.8 RC release is that its unprecedented size just was not an issue for those that are maintaining it. That, I’d argue, is because Linux has the best workflow process of any software project in the world.

    What does it mean to have the best workflow process? For me, it comes down to a set of basic rules that Linux kernel developers have established over time to allow them to produce relentlessly steady and reliable progress on a massive scale.

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