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Pocket P.C. design files released as open source (handheld Linux computer)

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Linux
OSS

The Popcorn Computers Pocket P.C. is designed to be a handheld Linux computer with a 4.95 inch full HD display, a built-in keyboard, and a ARM Cortex-A53 quad-core processor.

First unveiled in November 2019, the Pocket P.C. hasn’t shipped yet. It’s still up for pre-order for $199 and up.

But the developers have already open sourced the hardware by releasing the latest design files. You can find the at the project’s GitHub page.

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Popcorn Computers Pocket PC Linux handheld open source design

  • Popcorn Computers Pocket PC Linux handheld open source design files now available

    Even though the Pocket P.C. is still available to preorder priced at $199 the development team at Popcorn Computers have released the open source design files for the handheld Linux computer. The small handheld PC is capable of running Debian 10, Mainline Linux and is compatible with Gadget OS and Buildroot and comes complete with an open source keyboard and LED controller firmware.

    “Finally, a handheld Linux device with a high-definition 1080p display and large battery life. Pocket P.C. is your hacker terminal on-the-go. People should be able to use their devices as they want. This is the premise that we based Pocket P.C. on when we began development of this device. This is the device we always dreamed of owning that’s why we made it. In today’s technology lanscape, there are plenty of Android and iOS devices however Linux-based are largely ignored.”

POPCORN POCKET P. C. OPEN SOURCED

  • POPCORN POCKET P. C. OPEN SOURCED

    If you miss the days you could get an organizer that would — sort of — run Linux, you might be interested in Popcorn computer’s Pocket P. C., which was recently open-sourced on GitHub. Before you jump over to build one, though, there are a few things you should know.

    First, the files are untested since the first unit hasn’t shipped yet. In addition, while the schematic looks pretty complete, there’s no actual bill of materials and the PCB layers in the PDF file might not be very easy to replicate, since they are just a series of images, one for each layer. You can see an overview video of the device, below.

    Still, the information is there, although we haven’t seen the software yet. The device itself is interesting with a built-in keyboard. The specs are relatively straightforward. A quad-core ARM running at 1.2 GHz, 2GB of RAM, and 32GB of eMMC. The IPS LCD is just shy of five inches and has a 1920×1080 resolution. There’s the usual suite of connectors and interfaces and you can get a version that incorporates LoRa.

    We hope Popcorn will continue releasing information on the device and will make enough software information available for the device to be truly open source. Of course, most of us will just buy one anyway, but it is nice to know that the source is there if you were to want it.

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