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IBM/Red Hat: ApacheDS LDAP, OpenEEW, Command Line Heroes

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Red Hat
  • Secure authentication with Red Hat AMQ 7.7 and ApacheDS LDAP server

    In this article, we will integrate Red Hat AMQ 7.7 with the ApacheDS LDAP server. However, any version of the AMQ 7.x series can be integrated with the steps mentioned in this article.

    For this example integration, we’ll use Apache Directory Studio, which is an LDAP browser and directory client for ApacheDS. You will learn how to set up the ApacheDS LDAP server from scratch, and how to integrate the new LDAP configuration changes that are required in AMQ 7.7. Finally, we’ll test the integration with an AMQ 7.7 shell-based client, using Hawtio as a graphical user interface (GUI). This will be helpful to system administrators and developers as they can quickly create a proof of concept for LDAP and AMQ integration. This will help in enabling role-based access control(RBAC) for accessing AMQ 7.7.

  • Red Hat Insights delivers easier RHEL management with Red Hat knowledge base integration and enhanced customer portal applications

    As a system administrator, working quickly and efficiently is important. There is a good chance that you manage a large estate of Red Hat Enterprise Linux systems and that it continues to grow in complexity. In this post, we'll look at some ways Red Hat Insights can help you deal with that complexity.

    Red Hat Insights, an operational efficiency and vulnerability risk management service that provides continuous, in-depth analysis of registered RHEL systems, is included in your Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription. Some users have referred to Insights as "like having an extra pair of eyes" to help you identify and manage risks to security, compliance, and operations across your evolving environments.

    Now, we’ve added three new integrations between Insights and the Red Hat Customer Portal to help you become even more productive.

  • IBM-backed Grillo open sources earthquake early-warning system through The Linux Foundation

    Earlier today, The Linux Foundation announced it will host a new initiative to accelerate the standardization and deployment of earthquake early-warning (EEW) systems for earthquake preparedness around the world. Created by Grillo with support from IBM, USAID, the Clinton Foundation, and Arrow Electronics, the OpenEEW project includes the core components of the Grillo EEW system composed of integrated capabilities to sense, detect, and analyze earthquakes and to alert communities.

    IBM was originally connected to Grillo through the Clinton Foundation at a convening of the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Action Network. Now, IBM is assisting Grillo by adding the OpenEEW earthquake technology into the Call for Code deployment pipeline supported by The Linux Foundation.

    We sat down with Call for Code Chief Technology Officer Daniel Krook and IBM Developer Advocate Pedro Cruz to learn more about OpenEEW.

  • IBM, Grillo, and the Linux Foundation partner on early earthquake detection systems

    The Linux Foundation — in partnership with IBM and startup Grillo — today announced an initiative called OpenEEW to accelerate the deployment of open source earthquake early warning (EEW) detection systems around the world. The organizations say OpenEEW will incorporate sensing, detection, and analysis components from Grillo’s EEW platform, along with a Docker software version of the detection component that can be deployed to Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Cloud.

    An estimated 3 billion people live with the threat of earthquakes globally. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, in California, there’s a 94% chance that an earthquake will not be just a foreshock. Yet only a few countries — like Mexico, Japan, Turkey, Romania, China, Italy, portions of the U.S., and Taiwan — have EEWs, in part because they can cost upwards of $1 billion.

  • The Linux Foundation, Grillo and IBM Announce New Earthquake Early-Warning Open Source Project

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host Grillo’s OpenEEW project in collaboration with IBM to accelerate the standardization and deployment of earthquake early-warning systems (EEWs) for earthquake preparedness around the world. The project includes the core components of the Grillo EEW system comprised of integrated capabilities to sense, detect and analyze earthquakes as well as alert communities. OpenEEW was created by Grillo with support from IBM, USAID, the Clinton Foundation and Arrow Electronics.

    Earthquakes often have the most severe consequences in developing countries, due in part to construction and infrastructure issues. Timely alerts have the potential to help save lives in the communities where earthquakes pose the greatest threat. EEW systems provide public alerts in countries including Mexico, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, but nearly three billion people globally live with the threat of an earthquake and don’t have access to nation-wide systems, which can cost upwards of one billion U.S. dollars. OpenEEW wants to help reduce the costs of EEW systems, accelerate their deployments around the world and has the potential to save many lives.

    “The OpenEEW Project represents the very best in technology and in open source,” said Mike Dolan, Senior Vice President and GM of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “We’re pleased to be able to host and support such an important project and community at the Linux Foundation. The open source community can enable rapid development and deployment of these critical systems across the world.”

  • [S5:E3] Command Line Heroes: What Kind Of Coder Will You Become?

More IBM

  • IBM, the Linux Foundation, and Grillo unveil global earthquake early-warning system

    Only a handful of countries (Japan, Taiwan, Mexico, and China) have nation-wide earthquake early-warning systems. Isn’t that weird?

    Many other countries have alert systems in place for certain portions of the population but a significant portion of the estimated 2.7 billion people who live in daily risk of experiencing a dangerous earthquake remain uncovered.

Grillo

Open source takes on earthquake early warning project

  • Open source takes on earthquake early warning project

    While my little earthquake did no real damage, they can kill thousands of people and destroy billions of dollars of infrastructure. Any early warning can save lives which is why countries like Mexico, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan have national earthquake early-warning systems (EWW)s.

    Earthquakes often hit developing countries the worst due in part to their poor construction and infrastructure. 2010's Haiti earthquake, for instance, killed more than 200,000 people and caused over 10 billion dollars of damage.

    Timely alerts can save lives in the communities where earthquakes pose the greatest threat. EEW systems provide public alerts in some countries. Even a few seconds can make a difference. But, as The Linux Foundation states, "nearly three billion people globally live with the threat of an earthquake and don't have access to nation-wide systems, which can cost upwards of one billion U.S. dollars." OpenEEW wants to help reduce these costs, accelerate their deployments around the world, and help save many lives.

New Open Source Project Provides Early Warning for Earthquakes

  • New Open Source Project Provides Early Warning for Earthquakes

    The OpenEEW initiative will share data, sensor technology, and detection algorithms through The Linux Foundation’s Code and Response framework. According to the OpenEEW website, this will “enable others around the world to start building their own EEW systems based on our approach, it will also, we hope, lead to the creation of a global community collaborating to develop ever-better EEW systems, always with the end goal of providing life-saving alerts and increasing resilience against earthquakes.”

OpenEEW Formed to Expedite Earthquake Warning Systems

  • OpenEEW Formed to Expedite Earthquake Warning Systems

    A new coalition is building a low-cost solution to save lives in earthquake-threatened regions, rather than garnishing a profit from a new early-warning system. OpenEEW is an open-source IoT project with the goal to save lives by reducing the cost of earthquake early-warning (EEW) systems and accelerating their deployments globally.

    The Linux Foundation earlier this month announced that it will host the project’s developer — Grillo — in collaboration with IBM. The project includes the core components of the Grillo EEW system, comprised of integrated capabilities to sense, detect, and analyze earthquakes and alert communities.

    Nearly one-third of the world’s population live in seismically-active regions. At risk is the safety and survival of approximately three billion people living in earthquake-prone areas without early-detection systems that could cost upwards of US$1 billion to put in place.

Open Source Project For Earthquake Warning Systems

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