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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Why upstream Ansible stopped shipping rpms

    The upstream Ansible Project used to ship rpms and tarballs on their server, releases.ansible.com. For Ansible-2.10+, they’ve (I’m part of the project although not the originator of this decision) decided not to ship rpms anymore and to push people to use pypi.python.org as the official source of the tarballs. This came up in a recent thread on twitter with a question of whether this meant that Ansible was forgetting who it was meant to serve (sysadmins) as sysadmins want to get their software in their platforms’ native packaging format rather than the language packaging format.

    [...]

    Getting back to the fear that removing rpms from releases.ansible.com was an indication that ansible is forgetting that it is a tool for sysadmins and needs to be shipped in ways that sysadmins will find palatable…. I don’t think that the removal of rpms and traballs is an indication as the above rationale seems like it will make things better for sysadmins in the end. However, ansible-2.10 is a big realignment of how ansible is developed and shipped and I think those changes are going to have costs for sysadmins [2]_, [3]_. nirik (Kevin Fenzi, the Fedora/EPEL ansible package maintainer) and I have been talking on and off about how the Fedora/EPEL ansible rpm should be adapted to minimize those costs but it is a large change and changes are often both hard in the transition and, after the transition is over, may be better in many areas but worse in some others. Ideas about how we can smooth out the things that are worse while taking advantage of the things that are better is appreciated!

  • Join us at IBM Z Day 2020!

    On September 15, we’ll be hosting our second annual IBM Z Day, a free virtual event that will bring together mainframe experts from all over the world to share their stories. This year, we’re digging deep into the IBM Z organization to feature all of the latest breakthrough innovations.

    This past year has been filled with exciting announcements in the realm of IBM Z and IBM LinuxONE — starting with the launch of the IBM z15 and LinuxONE III in September 2019, and continuing with announcements around IBM Data Privacy Passports, IBM Secure Execution for Linux, Red Hat OpenShift for IBM Z and LinuxONE, Red Hat Ansible Certified Content for IBM Z, and more. In April, we put out a call for COBOL expertise, accelerating plans to release new COBOL training materials, discussion forums, and more in collaboration with the Open Mainframe Project. And just a couple of weeks ago, we announced the New to Z Community, where developers who are new to the mainframe can start building their careers.

    Bringing all of these accomplishments together, IBM Z Day will shine a light on these topics and more, with keynotes from IBM’s Ross Mauri, Willie Tejada, Marius Ciortea, and Meredith Stowell, along with John Mertic, Director of Program Management at the Linux Foundation.

  • Red Hat Has Been Working On "stalld" As A Thread Stall Detector + Booster

    Red Hat engineers in recent weeks began working on a new project called "starved" though recently renamed to "stalld". The stalld service is for serving as a Linux thread stall detector.

    The stalld daemon monitors Linux threads and detects when threads are stalled as a result of CPU starvation. The stalled thread is in turn boosted by stalld by setting the SCHED_DEADLINE policy and then the original policy restored following the boost.

  • Madeline Peck: Onto Part Time at Red Hat

    I hope everyone is having a great week. At the beginning of the summer, I thought today would be my last blog post since this is the end of the summer internship. What an experience! However of course, I’ll still be here next week, just working way less a week haha.

    On Thursday last week Mo asked me to help with the Fedora 33 wallpaper draft package that was supposed to go out on Friday or Monday at the latest.

  • Custom Grafana dashboards for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4

    OpenShift administrators often face the same challenges as other system administrators: "I need a tool that will monitor the health of my system." Yet, traditional monitoring tools often fall short in their visibility of an OpenShift cluster. Thus, a typical OpenShift monitoring stack includes Prometheus for monitoring both systems and services, and Grafana for analyzing and visualizing metrics.

    Administrators are often looking to write custom queries and create custom dashboards in Grafana. However, Grafana instances provided with the monitoring stack (and its dashboards) are read-only. To solve this problem, we can use the community-powered Grafana operator provided by OperatorHub.

  • Can You Run Linux on a Power Server?
  • IBM's Possible Designs For Power10 Systems

    In the past two weeks, we have been telling you about the future Power10 processor that will eventually be able to support the IBM i platform as well as AIX, Big Blue’s flavor of Unix, and Linux, the open source operating system that is commercially exemplified by IBM’s Red Hat Enterprise Linux distribution. The leap in performance with Power10 is akin to those we saw between the generations spanning from Power6 through Power9.

    This week, we want to contemplate the systems that will be using the Power10 chip and how they will be similar to and different from past and current Power Systems machines. Then we are going to take deeper dive into performance, clustering systems through their memories rather than their I/O – perhaps the most exciting new thing in the Power architecture – and then also do a side foray into machine learning inference performance, which is going to be important for future commercial application workloads.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Late Night Linux, Destination Linux, and More

Kernel: Slowdown, CephFS, and FS-Cache / CacheFiles

  • How a performance boost in Linux kernel for one family of Intel chips slowed its latest Alder Lake processors

    The mixture of performance and efficiency CPUs in Intel’s 12th-gen Core processors, code-named Alder Lake, hasn’t just been causing problems for some Windows gamers – it almost led to complications for Linux. Phoronix’s Michael Larabel noticed a performance hit in the kernel a fortnight ago – in a work-in-progress release candidate, we should stress – and a fix for the scheduling code landed a little later. It turned out the kernel suffered on Alder Lake chips due to a performance-enhancing tweak for another Intel processor family: the multiple-Atom-core-based Jacobsville. This year, Intel officially canned its Lakefield chips. These consisted of a performance core called Sunny Cove as well as Atom-class efficiency cores dubbed Tremont. Crucially, there are still multi-Tremont-core embedded processors out there, such as Snow Ridge. These are server and infrastructure-oriented components with up to 24 cores. The first proposed cut of kernel 5.16, specifically 5.16-rc1, contained a revision to the scheduler that makes it aware that some clusters of cores share a block of L2 cache – as seen in Snow Ridge and Jacobsville.

  • Testing the Linux Kernel CephFS Client with xfstests

    I do a lot of testing with the kernel cephfs client these days, and have had a number of people ask about how I test it. For now, I’ll gloss over the cluster setup since there are other tutorials for that.

  • Major Rewrite Of Linux's FS-Cache / CacheFiles So It's Smaller & Simpler - Phoronix

    As part of David Howells of Red Hat long-term work on improving the caching code used by network file-systems, he today posted a big patch series rewriting the fscache and cachefiles code as the latest significant step on that adventure. Howells posted a set of 64 patches for rewriting the kernel's fscache and cachefiles code. Linux's fsache is a general purpose cache used by network file-systems while cachefiles is for providing a caching back-end for mounted local file-systems. The Red Hat engineer has been working on this rewrite for more than the past year.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter and Ubuntu Desktop on Google Clown

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 711

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 711 for the week of November 21 – 27, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Launch Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud

    This tutorial shows you how to set up a Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud. If you need a graphic interface to your virtual desktop on the cloud, this tutorial will teach you how to set up a desktop environment just like what you can get on your own computer.

Open Hardware/Modding: ESP32, 3-D Printing, Raspberry Pi Pico, PocketBeagle

  • Wireless thermal printer kit features M5Stack ATOM Lite controller - CNX Software

    This is certainly not the first ESP32 thermal printer solution, as there are various implementations including bitbank2 thermal printer Arduino connecting ESP32 and nRF52 boards to the printer over Bluetotoh LE, or a Arduino sketches to print bitmaps over serial or MQTT.

  • Generate Fully Parametric, 3D-Printable Speaker Enclosures | Hackaday

    Having the right speaker enclosure can make a big difference to sound quality, so it’s no surprise that customizable ones are a common project for those who treat sound seriously. In that vein, [zx82net]’s Universal Speaker Box aims to give one everything they need to craft the perfect enclosure.

  • Z80 Video Output Via The Raspberry Pi Pico | Hackaday

    Building basic computers from the ground up is a popular pastime in the hacker community. [Kevin] is one such enthusiast, and decided to whip up a video interface for his retro Z80 machine.

  • The Calculator Charm: Calculatorium Leviosa! | Hackaday

    Have you ever tried waving your hand around like a magic wand and summoning a calculator? We would guess not since you’d probably look a little silly doing so. That is unless you had [Andrei’s] cool gesture-controlled calculator. [Andrei] thought it would be helpful to use a calculator in his research lab without having to take his gloves off and the results are pretty cool. His hardware consists of a PocketBeagle, an OLED, and an MPU6050 inertial measurement unit for capturing his hand motions using an accelerometer and gyroscope. The hardware is pretty straightforward, so the beauty of this project lies in its machine learning implementation.