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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Why upstream Ansible stopped shipping rpms

    The upstream Ansible Project used to ship rpms and tarballs on their server, releases.ansible.com. For Ansible-2.10+, they’ve (I’m part of the project although not the originator of this decision) decided not to ship rpms anymore and to push people to use pypi.python.org as the official source of the tarballs. This came up in a recent thread on twitter with a question of whether this meant that Ansible was forgetting who it was meant to serve (sysadmins) as sysadmins want to get their software in their platforms’ native packaging format rather than the language packaging format.

    [...]

    Getting back to the fear that removing rpms from releases.ansible.com was an indication that ansible is forgetting that it is a tool for sysadmins and needs to be shipped in ways that sysadmins will find palatable…. I don’t think that the removal of rpms and traballs is an indication as the above rationale seems like it will make things better for sysadmins in the end. However, ansible-2.10 is a big realignment of how ansible is developed and shipped and I think those changes are going to have costs for sysadmins [2]_, [3]_. nirik (Kevin Fenzi, the Fedora/EPEL ansible package maintainer) and I have been talking on and off about how the Fedora/EPEL ansible rpm should be adapted to minimize those costs but it is a large change and changes are often both hard in the transition and, after the transition is over, may be better in many areas but worse in some others. Ideas about how we can smooth out the things that are worse while taking advantage of the things that are better is appreciated!

  • Join us at IBM Z Day 2020!

    On September 15, we’ll be hosting our second annual IBM Z Day, a free virtual event that will bring together mainframe experts from all over the world to share their stories. This year, we’re digging deep into the IBM Z organization to feature all of the latest breakthrough innovations.

    This past year has been filled with exciting announcements in the realm of IBM Z and IBM LinuxONE — starting with the launch of the IBM z15 and LinuxONE III in September 2019, and continuing with announcements around IBM Data Privacy Passports, IBM Secure Execution for Linux, Red Hat OpenShift for IBM Z and LinuxONE, Red Hat Ansible Certified Content for IBM Z, and more. In April, we put out a call for COBOL expertise, accelerating plans to release new COBOL training materials, discussion forums, and more in collaboration with the Open Mainframe Project. And just a couple of weeks ago, we announced the New to Z Community, where developers who are new to the mainframe can start building their careers.

    Bringing all of these accomplishments together, IBM Z Day will shine a light on these topics and more, with keynotes from IBM’s Ross Mauri, Willie Tejada, Marius Ciortea, and Meredith Stowell, along with John Mertic, Director of Program Management at the Linux Foundation.

  • Red Hat Has Been Working On "stalld" As A Thread Stall Detector + Booster

    Red Hat engineers in recent weeks began working on a new project called "starved" though recently renamed to "stalld". The stalld service is for serving as a Linux thread stall detector.

    The stalld daemon monitors Linux threads and detects when threads are stalled as a result of CPU starvation. The stalled thread is in turn boosted by stalld by setting the SCHED_DEADLINE policy and then the original policy restored following the boost.

  • Madeline Peck: Onto Part Time at Red Hat

    I hope everyone is having a great week. At the beginning of the summer, I thought today would be my last blog post since this is the end of the summer internship. What an experience! However of course, I’ll still be here next week, just working way less a week haha.

    On Thursday last week Mo asked me to help with the Fedora 33 wallpaper draft package that was supposed to go out on Friday or Monday at the latest.

  • Custom Grafana dashboards for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4

    OpenShift administrators often face the same challenges as other system administrators: "I need a tool that will monitor the health of my system." Yet, traditional monitoring tools often fall short in their visibility of an OpenShift cluster. Thus, a typical OpenShift monitoring stack includes Prometheus for monitoring both systems and services, and Grafana for analyzing and visualizing metrics.

    Administrators are often looking to write custom queries and create custom dashboards in Grafana. However, Grafana instances provided with the monitoring stack (and its dashboards) are read-only. To solve this problem, we can use the community-powered Grafana operator provided by OperatorHub.

  • Can You Run Linux on a Power Server?
  • IBM's Possible Designs For Power10 Systems

    In the past two weeks, we have been telling you about the future Power10 processor that will eventually be able to support the IBM i platform as well as AIX, Big Blue’s flavor of Unix, and Linux, the open source operating system that is commercially exemplified by IBM’s Red Hat Enterprise Linux distribution. The leap in performance with Power10 is akin to those we saw between the generations spanning from Power6 through Power9.

    This week, we want to contemplate the systems that will be using the Power10 chip and how they will be similar to and different from past and current Power Systems machines. Then we are going to take deeper dive into performance, clustering systems through their memories rather than their I/O – perhaps the most exciting new thing in the Power architecture – and then also do a side foray into machine learning inference performance, which is going to be important for future commercial application workloads.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to Change HiDPI Scaling Settings on Linux

    For years, laptops and computer monitors have come with increasingly high-resolution displays. Text that looks great on a 1080p display can be too small and unreadable on a 4K one. Operating systems can upscale what's on-screen, but since 4K and other high-resolution screens come in many different sizes, there's no one-size-fits-all solution. Linux distributors have a particularly challenging time in part because Linux rarely comes pre-installed on devices. So, if you're a Linux user looking to tweak HiDPI settings, how do you go about this, and what do you need to know? Let's find out.

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Magazine #177

    Excerpt from my Editorial: Probably for the first time in FCM history we only have enough for two HowTo articles. […] As stated last month: we DESPERATELY need articles. I’ve got nothing spare. So, PLEASE, spend a few moments to write SOMETHING about what you know. It can be ANYTHING as long as it has something to do with Linux; hardware/software reviews, a how-to on something, even your story of how you found Ubuntu/Linux (of any flavor). Send whatever to: ronnie@fullcirclemagazine.org

  • Whatsdesk- Install WhatsApp Client on Ubuntu 22.0 | 20.04 - Linux Shout

    WhatsApp client is not officially available for Linux systems, hence, we can install an unofficial one i.e WhatsDesk on Ubuntu 22.04 | 20.04 using SNAP craft. Although Linux is not anymore the OS of developers only, still, WhatApp official client app is not available to install on Ubuntu. Therefore, if someone wants to use WhatsApp on Linux, they either have to use its web version or need to go for any third part unofficial client such as WhatsDesk.

  • How to Find Process ID (PID and PPID) in Linux

    Knowing the PID and PPID of a process can be helpful if you need to manage or interact with a process running on your system. There are numerous ways to get the PID (Process ID) and PPID (Parent Process ID) of a given process in Linux.

  • Install Discord Client on openSUSE Leap 15 - LinuxCapable

    Discord is a free voice, video, and text chat app used by tens of millions of people ages 13+ to talk and hang out with their communities and friends. Users communicate with voice calls, video calls, text messaging, media, and files in private chats or as part of communities called “servers.” Discord is available on Windows, macOS, and Linux Distros. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install Discord client on openSUSE Leap 15. The tutorial will use the terminal for installation found in Activities> Show Applications > Terminal.

  • Install GNOME Tweaks Tool on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - LinuxCapable

    GNOME is a popular desktop used on many Linux distributions, including Ubuntu. The GNOME Tweaks tool allows users to modify and change the cosmetics in their GNOME desktop environment, which is popular amongst users that are not satisfied entirely with the GUI. Some of the things you can do with GNOME Tweaks are edit font colors and scaling, disable animations for desktop speed improvement, change themes, manage GNOME extensions, bar changes, and much more. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install GNOME Tweaks on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Focal Fossa.

  • Install Grafana On Ubuntu / Rocky Linux & Fedora | Tips On UNIX

    Grafana is an open-source Analytics software with visualization. It provides you with tools to turn your time series database data into insightful graphs and visualizations. Grafana supports multiple data sources like Prometheus, Graphite, InfluxDB, Elasticsearch, Zabbix, etc… This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to install Grafana on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, Rocky Linux 8, AlmaLinux 8, and Fedora 35.

  • Install UNRAR on Fedora Linux 35 - LinuxCapable

    UNRAR is widely known and used amongst Windows users. RAR files are much smaller archives and compress better than ZIP for most files by compressing files “together,” saving more space. UNRAR does not come pre-installed natively on Fedora and is not featured in its repositories. The following tutorial will show you how to install UNRAR on Fedora Linux 35 Workstation or Server with RPM FUSION, along with the most commonly used commands.

New Theme Brings libadwaita’s Sleek Looks to Older GTK Apps

This third-party theme back-ports the bulk of the libadwaita stylesheet to a regular GTK theme that works with GTK3 apps. As this theme is under active development you can’t be too picky if there are a few unpadded highlights or errant pixels; it’s not a 1:1 clone of what you seen in GNOME 42 screenshots (or any GTK4 libadwaita apps you currently use) but it’s a close enough approximation. Also: this is purely superficial; you won’t magically find GTK4 features, widgets, or animations nestled inside your GTK3 apps. Read more

Chrome and Mozilla: Privacy, Net Neutrality, and Firefox Changes

  • Google Just Gave You the Best Reason Yet to Finally Quit Using Chrome

    Ultimately, that change in the way Google is looking at Chrome--that it isn't a tool that serves its users, but is a tool that serves up users to advertisers, albeit in a slightly more privacy protective way--is a bad sign. It's also the best reason to finally ditch it altogether.

  • In California, an Important Victory for Net Neutrality

    Today, the Ninth Circuit court upheld California’s net neutrality law, affirming that California residents can continue to benefit from the fundamental safeguards of equal treatment and open access to the internet. This decision clears the way for states to enforce their own net neutrality laws, ensuring that consumers can freely access ideas and services without unnecessary roadblocks. Net neutrality matters, as much of our daily life is now online. It ensures that consumers are protected from ISPs blocking or throttling their access to websites, or creating fast lanes and slow lanes for popular services.

  • How to restore Firefox's classic download behavior

    Mozilla plans to change the download behavior of the Firefox web browser in Firefox 97; this guide helps restore the classic download functionality of the browser. Firefox users who download files currently get a download prompt when they do so. The prompt displays options to open the file using an application or save it to the local system. Starting in Firefox 97, Firefox is not displaying the prompt anymore by default.

This week in KDE: Getting Plasma 5.24 ready for release - Adventures in Linux and KDE

Plasma 5.24 is almost ready! I mentioned last week that I haven’t been posting about fixes for regressions in 5.24 that never got released, because there would be too many. Nonetheless people have been working very hard on this, and we’re down to only 7, with two of them having open merge requests! Working on those is appreciated, as it helps improve the stability of the final release in a week and a half. Read more