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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • [RFC] nvfs: a filesystem for persistent memory

    I am developing a new filesystem suitable for persistent memory - nvfs. The goal is to have a small and fast filesystem that can be used on DAX-based devices. Nvfs maps the whole device into linear address space and it completely bypasses the overhead of the block layer and buffer cache.

  • Red Hat Has Been Working On New NVFS File-System

    Yet another new file-system being worked on for the Linux/open-source world is NVFS and has been spearheaded by a Red Hat engineer.

    NVFS aims to be a speedy file-system for persistent memory like Intel Optane DCPMM. NVFS is geared for use on DAX-based (direct access) devices and maps the entire device into a linear address space that bypasses the Linux kernel's block layer and buffer cache.

  • Optimizing a Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation ISO image

    Modifying Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation media is not a supported process, but this handy workaround may be useful to you. Please see this solution on the Red Hat Customer Portal for more information and other options that you may wish to consider for your environment.

    Not everyone has high-speed network connections to locations where they need to install Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Customers often ask how they can reduce the installation media to make delivery over slower networks faster. I walk you through the steps to build a custom, small RHEL installation ISO. The default RHEL 7.8 ISO is over 4GB in size; these steps show you how to create a RHEL 7.8 ISO that is 1GB in size and supports a smaller RHEL installation.

  • IBM Contributing A2O Processor Core To OpenPOWER Community

    IBM announced today at the OpenPOWER Summit 2020 that they are contributing the A2O POWER processor core and Open Cognitive Environment to the OpenPOWER community.

    The A2O processor core is now open-source as a POWER ISA core for embedded use in SoC designs. The A2O offers better single threaded performance over its predecessor and supports 2-way SMT, PowerISA 2.07, and a modular design.

  • IBM and Red Hat: Nearly two decades of Linux innovation across computing architectures

    In the decades since its inception, Linux has become synonymous with collaboration, both at a technical and organizational standpoint. This community work, from independent contributors, end users and IT vendors, has helped Linux adapt and embrace change, rather than fight it. A powerful example of this collaboration was the launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 2.1 in 2002, heralding the march of Linux across the enterprise world. Today, Red Hat Enterprise is a bellwether for Linux in production systems, serving as the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform to power organizations across the world and across the open hybrid cloud.

    All of this innovation and industry leadership wouldn’t have been possible without a strong partner ecosystem, including the close ties we’ve long had with IBM. IBM was one of the first major technology players to recognize the value in Linux, especially RHEL. As IBM Z and IBM LinuxONE celebrate 20 years of powering enterprise IT today, this benchmark provides further validation of the need for enterprise-grade Linux across architectures, especially as the requirements of modern businesses change dynamically.

  • Achievement unlocked: How we revamped the Red Hat Learning Subscription dashboard

    The final destination of a journey is what usually has the most focus, but it’s also important to understand the steps it took to arrive there. This certainly holds true for learning, especially as you work to achieve something as big as a Red Hat certification. You ultimately want that tangible object that says "I have the knowledge and I can prove it," but what about the milestones that marked your progress to get to that result? The achievements earned along the way that consistently reminded you that you are on the right path? Understanding the small goals in pursuit of larger ones helps you keep motivated to continue progressing.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 Achieves NIAP Common Criteria Certification

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 has achieved Common Criteria Certification as well as Commercial Solutions for Classified (CSfC) Status.

  • Should Modern Developers Care About Mainframe?

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Android Leftovers

Arm Officially Supports Panfrost Open-Source Mali GPU Driver Development

Most GPU drivers found in Arm processors are known to be closed-source making it difficult and time-consuming to fix some of the bugs since everybody needs to rely on the silicon vendor to fix those for them, and they may even decide a particular bug is not important to them, so you’d be out of luck. So the developer community has long tried to reverse-engineer GPU drivers with projects like Freedreno (Qualcomm Adreno), Etnaviv (Vivante), as well as Lima and Panfrost for Arm Mali GPUs. Several years ago, Arm management was not interested at all collaborating with open-source GPU driver development for Mali GPUs, but as noted by Phoronix, Alyssa Rosenzweig, a graphics software engineer employed by Collabora, explained Panfrost development was now done in partnership with Arm during a talk at the annual X.Org Developers’ Conference (XDC 2020). Read more

Open Up: Open Source Hardware — A Chat with Carl

From a broader lens, to produce “open source hardware” means that we have developed and shared the recipe to create a high-end commercial product that can be learned from, adapted, and used by anyone else. In the same way we’ve stood on the shoulders of the Linux and open source software giants who came before us, we now get to be pioneers in developing open source hardware for those who come next. If you want to learn more how a computer is designed or how something is made, our schematics are the instructions for how to do it. It describes every step of the process, from each piece of the machine and its dimensions, to the type of aluminum used and how to bend it. It’s similar to open source software in that you can learn from the product, adapt it to your needs, and distribute it. The difference is that it requires outside equipment to produce your own version. Open hardware has become more accessible with 3-D printing, but as we found when we were making acrylic prototypes of Thelio, you reach a point where it’s time to work with metal, which presents its own challenges. You have to cut it, bend it, and paint it, all of which requires specific equipment. Read more

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