Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Named a Leader by Independent Research Firm in Multicloud Container Development Platforms Evaluation

    Red Hat was evaluated for The Forrester Wave™ based on 29 criteria across three categories: Current Offering, Strategy and Market Presence. Red Hat OpenShift received the highest scores among evaluated products in each of these categories, with the maximum possible score in both the Strategy and Market Presence categories.

    According to Forrester’s evaluation, "OpenShift is the most widely deployed multicloud container platform and boasts powerful development and unified operations experiences across many public and on-premises platforms. Red Hat pioneered the ‘operator’ model for infrastructure and application management and provides a rich partner ecosystem and popular marketplace. Red Hat and IBM aim to make ‘build once, deploy anywhere’ a reality; both companies’ deep commitment to Kubernetes-powered modernization has paid off, moving OpenShift further ahead of the market since Forrester’s last evaluation."

  • In the Clouds with Red Hat Leadership: Joe Fernandes

    Red Hat’s senior leadership is having to execute at an ever-increasing pace. This episode of In the Clouds provides host Chris Short inviting thoughtful and candid discussions with the one and only Joe Fernandes, VP & GM Core Cloud Platforms.

  • IBM Publishes Quantum Computing Roadmap

    IBM has published a roadmap for the future of its quantum computing hardware, which indicates that the company is on its way to building a quantum processor with more than 1,000 qubits—and somewhere between 10 and 50 logical qubits—by the end of 2023.

    IBM’s Dario Gil believes that 2023 will be an inflection point in the industry, with the road to the 1,121-qubit machine driving improvements across the stack.

  • How emotionally intelligent leaders handle 6 difficult situations during the pandemic

    Emotional intelligence, or EQ, has always been an important component of effective leadership. However, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has both heightened the awareness of EQ in the workplace and also tested it. What’s more, the pandemic is just one of multiple stressors IT leaders and their employees may be dealing with right now. There’s also a divisive upcoming election. High levels of unemployment. Civil unrest. Any of a number of natural disasters. And then the normal day-to-day stress of work.

    “Essentially, when we are tired, or sick, or stressed, we don’t have the same ability to manage our reactions. So we might not react in a way that’s consistent with who we want to be as a leader, manager, or team player. Right now, we’re dealing with a lot of different stressors at once,” says Janele Lynn, owner of the Lynn Leadership Group, who helps leaders build trusting relationships through emotional intelligence.

  • Justin W. Flory: A reflection: Gabriele Trombini (mailga)

    Two years passed since we last met in Bolzano. I remember you traveled in for a day to join the 2018 Fedora Mindshare FAD. You came many hours from your home to see us, and share your experiences and wisdom from both the global and Italian Fedora Community. And this week, I learned that you, Gabriele Trombini, passed away from a heart attack. To act like the news didn’t affect me denies my humanity. In 2020, a year that feels like it has taken away so much already, we are greeted by another heart-breaking loss.

    But to succumb to the despair and sadness of this year would deny the warm, happy memories we shared together. We shared goals of supporting the Fedora Project but also learning from each other.

    So, this post is a brief reflection of your life as I knew you. A final celebration of the great memories we shared together, that I only wish I could have shared with you while you were still here.

  • Remi Collet: PHP version 7.3.23RC1 and 7.4.11RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests, and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 7.4.11RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 32-33 or remi-php74-test repository for Fedora 31 and Enterprise Linux 7-8.

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.23RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 31 or remi-php73-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Man-DB Brings Documentation to IBM i

    IBM i developers who have a question about how a particular command or feature works in open source packages now have an easy way to look up documentations, thanks to the addition of support for the Man-DB utility in IBM i, which IBM unveiled in late July.

    Man-DB is an open source implementation of the standard Unix documentation system. It provides a mechanism for easily accessing the documentation that exists for open source packages, such as the Node.js language, or even for commands, like Curl.

    The software, which can be installed via YUM, only works with open source software on IBM i at the moment; it doesn’t support native programs or commands.

  • Open Mainframe Project Announces Record Growth with the Launch of Four New Projects, a COBOL Working Group and Micro Focus as a New Member
  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 228

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from Cockpit version 228.

  • Managing the security of your Red Hat Enterprise Linux environment with Red Hat Insights

    When it comes to managing security risks, enterprises face an increasing number of challenges. One of these challenges is managing the security health of the IT infrastructure and this is a critical, ongoing, constantly evolving need. As an enterprise, managing the security risks on your infrastructure without any disruption to the business has become a critical exercise.

    The security of your infrastructure is no longer a concern only for the security roles in your organization. Security topics are repeatedly brought up in the C-suite and in board discussions. When the stakes are high and the health or your business depends on it, you need to have a game plan to stay ahead of these risks while keeping the operational costs in check.

  • Supporting the touchless banking customer experience

    In this new-experience economy, banks are going to need to not only meet, but exceed customer expectations. What are financial institutions going to do to ensure that their customers can have the experience that they desire while feeling safe when visiting a branch, interacting with an advisor, or conducting routine and complex financial transactions?

    Supporting the touchless customer experience will require the right amount of technology and acceptable in-person interactions to ensure that the financial institution is providing the necessary level of empathy while ensuring that the customers and employees remain safe. While handshakes will need to be put on hold, there are ways banks can safely engage with customers from the time that they enter the branch or reach out through digital channels.

  • Kubeflow 1.0 monitoring and enhanced JupyterHub builds in Open Data Hub 0.8

    The new Open Data Hub version 0.8 (ODH) release includes many new features, continuous integration (CI) additions, and documentation updates. For this release, we focused on enhancing JupyterHub image builds, enabling more mixing of Open Data Hub and Kubeflow components, and designing our comprehensive end-to-end continuous integration and continuous deployment and delivery (CI/CD) process. In this article, we introduce the highlights of this newest release.

    [...]

    In an effort to allow data scientists to turn their notebooks into Argo Workflows or Kubeflow pipelines, we’ve added an exciting new tool called Elyra to Open Data Hub 0.8. The process of converting all of the work that a data scientist has created in notebooks to a production-level pipeline is cumbersome and usually manual. Elyra lets you execute this process from the JupyterLab portal with just a few clicks. As shown in Figure 1, Elyra is now included in a JupyterHub notebook image.

    [...]

    As part of our effort to make Kubeflow and Open Data Hub components interchangeable, we’ve added monitoring capabilities to Kubeflow. With ODH 0.8, users can add Prometheus and Grafana for Kubeflow component monitoring. Currently, not all Kubeflow components support a Prometheus endpoint. We did turn on the Prometheus endpoint in Argo, and we’ve provided the example dashboard shown in Figure 3, which lets users monitor their pipelines.

  • Call for Code Daily: regional finalists, problem solvers, and Kode With Klossy

    The power of Call for Code® is in the global community that we have built around this major #TechforGood initiative. Whether it is the deployments that are underway across pivotal projects, developers leveraging the starter kits in the cloud, or ecosystem partners joining the fight, everyone has a story to tell. Call for Code Daily highlights all the amazing #TechforGood stories taking place around the world. Every day, you can count on us to share these stories with you. Check out the stories from the week of September 14.

    [...]

    In precarious times like the ones we are dealing with right now, it’s important to recognize that everyone is feeling the repercussions. While COVID-19 impacted corporations, schools, and retailers at scale, it also impacted young children around the world who are adjusting to their new normal. In an effort to engage this community and provide an outlet to relieve stress and anxiety for those that fall into this category, the TravelQuest team, comprised of Kode With Klossy Scholars, developed an app that blends gamification with educational entertainment to boost the emotional states for all its users.

  • Why go with agile integration?

    You probably have heard about agile integrations, and you may wonder why should you adopt it anyways? Well, technology today is becoming smarter than ever. This is the time to not only trust the technology, but also to rethink of how you can modernize your applications in a distributed, hybrid and multicloud world.

    Data is growing dramatically over the years, and enterprises are challenged to derive rich insights and knowledge from the huge amounts of data. However, enterprises face many challenges and bottlenecks when connecting various systems or applications within heterogeneous environments, due to portability and interoperability limitations. In addition, there is an increasing demand for continuous integration and continuous delivery and continuous deployment (CI/CD). Businesses today acquire the agility and rapid response to changing business demands in a continuous manner. In such scenarios, a centralized traditional integration might not be the best idea. Comparatively, an agile integration perfectly fits and helps to reduce the costs and increase the speed, and additionally allows a room of innovation.

  • Q&A: Unleashing the Beast—Bringing Linux to IBM Z

    Bringing Linux to IBM Z was an important moment in IBM’s history. What was it like to start your career at such an exciting moment?

    Betzler: When I started at IBM, we were looking at green screens—quite different from the IBM Z user experience today. But what I really saw behind the screen was the potential to innovate. How could I get more access to this amazing computer? How could we unleash the beast of Linux on Z?

    Adlung: We knew there was a need for a smart way to bring Unix back to the mainframe. The answer was open source and Boas proposed using Linux for it—and I was ready to be among the first to attempt it.

    Betzler: I knew if we could get Java onto the mainframe, we needed an operating system. If we could use open and modern technology and code that was available as open source, I knew we could innovate. We started on what was supposed to be a fun project. But it quickly turned into an overnight and weekend activity.

    Adlung: People often asked us “Why are you doing this?” And 20 years earlier I’d always say, “because we can.”

    We had a vision—not just programming for the sake of programming. We wanted to bring the Linux experience to the mainframe, which implied embracing open source programming, which was unheard at that time. And with a spirited team working at 3 a.m. in our spare time, we had the potential to go from a skunkworks project to a strategic imperative for the company. We were pushing the envelope at every turn.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

The Most Innovative ~$50 Graphics Card For Linux Users

This ~$50 USD graphics card is open-source friendly, can drive four display outputs simultaneously, passively cooled, and can fit in a PCI Express x1 slot. It's a unique card offering good value especially for those Linux users wanting open-source friendly hardware. Earlier this year ASUS announced the GT710-4H-SL-2GD5. In the months since we didn't hear anything more about it given the pandemic but recently saw it became available via Internet retailers and picked one up for testing. Read more

Plasma on the Edge

You probably have heard the news by now that Microsoft have released the Linux version of their new Chromium-based Edge web browser. Of course I’ve been waiting for this day ever since they announced the switcheroo to Chromium in order to bring Plasma Browser Integration to Edge users. It took Microsoft almost two decades to offer another web browser to a Unixoid desktop and this time around it’s based on KDE’s legacy – what a time to be alive! You can already use Plasma Browser Integration just fine with Edge by installing it from the Chrome web store. Until Plasma 5.21 is out, however, it will only see it as yet another Chromium, meaning that KRunner, media controls, and so on might not map to the correct browser window or show only a generic icon. Read more

Python Programming

  • Webinar Recording: “virtualenv – a deep dive” with Bernat Gabor – PyCharm Blog | JetBrains

    PyCharm virtual environments are an important but challenging topic. We recently hosted Bernat Gabor to discuss this, as well as his rewrite of virtualenv, the hugely-popular command-line tool for creating virtual environment. The recording is now available. This was a very engaging webinar, with lots of questions, and many thanks to Bernat for taking the time to give thoughtful replies.

  • Python Morsels: The 2 Types of "Change" in Python

    The word "change" is ambiguous in Python: we have two distinct types of "change" in Python. We can "change" a variable by changing which object that variable is pointing to. We do that through an assignment statement. We can also "change" an actual object through a mutation. Let's take a look at both types of change.

  • Python: Slice Notation on String

    The term slicing in programming usually refers to obtaining a substring, sub-tuple, or sublist from a string, tuple, or list respectively. Python offers an array of straightforward ways to slice not only these three but any iterable. An iterable is, as the name suggests, any object that can be iterated over. In this article, we'll go over everything you need to know about Slicing Strings in Python.

  • R vs Python for Data Analysis — An Objective Comparison

    There are dozens articles out there that compare R vs. Python from a subjective, opinion-based perspective. Both Python and R are great options for data analysis, or any work in the data science field. But if your goal is to figure out which language is right for you, reading the opinion of someone else may not be helpful. One person's "easy" is another person's "hard," and vice versa. In this article, we're going to do something different. We'll take an objective look at how both languages handle everyday data science tasks so that you can look at them side-by-side, and see which one looks better for you. Keep in mind, you don't need to actually understand all of this code to make a judgment here! We'll give you R vs Python code snippets for each task — simply scan through the code and consider which one seems more "readable" to you. Read the explanations, and see if one language holds more appeal than the other.