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GDB 10.1 released

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Development
GNU

            GDB 10.1 released!

Release 10.1 of GDB, the GNU Debugger, is now available.  GDB is
a source-level debugger for Ada, C, C++, Fortran, Go, Rust, and many
other languages.  GDB can target (i.e., debug programs running on)
more than a dozen different processor architectures, and GDB itself
can run on most popular GNU/Linux, Unix and Microsoft Windows variants.
GDB is free (libre) software.

You can download GDB from the GNU FTP server in the directory:

        ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gdb

The vital stats:

  Size   md5sum                            Name
  21MiB  1822a7dd45e7813f4408407eec1a6af1  gdb-10.1.tar.xz
  39MiB  67b01c95c88ab8e05a08680904bd6c92  gdb-10.1.tar.gz

There is a web page for GDB at:

        http://www.gnu.org/software/gdb/

That page includes information about GDB mailing lists (an announcement
mailing list, developers discussion lists, etc.), details on how to
access GDB's source repository, locations for development snapshots,
preformatted documentation, and links to related information around
the net.  We will put errata notes and host-specific tips for this release
on-line as any problems come up.  All mailing lists archives are also
browsable via the web.

GDB 10.1 includes the following changes and enhancements:

* Support for debugging new targets:

  - BPF  (bpf-unknown-none)

* GDBserver support for the following targets:

  - ARC GNU/Linux
  - RISC-V GNU/Linux

* Multi-target debugging support (experimental)

* Support for debuginfod, an HTTP server for distributing ELF/DWARF
  debugging information as well as source code.

* Support for debugging a 32-bit Windows program using a 64-bit Windows GDB.

* Support for building GDB with GNU Guile 3.0 and 2.2 (in addition to 2.0)

* Improved performance during startup through the use of threading
  during symbol table loading (an optional feature in GDB 9, now
  enabled by default in GDB 10).

* Various enhancements to the Python and Guile APIs

* Various TUI Mode fixes and enhancements.

* Other miscellaneous enhancements:

  - Detection when attaching to a process of a mismatch between
    this process and the executable previously loaded into GDB.

  - Support for default arguments for "alias" commands.

* GDBserver support for the following host triplets has been removed:

    i[34567]86-*-lynxos*
    powerpc-*-lynxos*
    i[34567]86-*-nto*
    bfin-*-*linux*
    crisv32-*-linux*
    cris-*-linux*
    m32r*-*-linux*
    tilegx-*-linux*
    arm*-*-mingw32ce*
    i[34567]86-*-mingw32ce*

For a complete list and more details on each item, please see the gdb/NEWS
file, available at:
https://sourceware.org/git/gitweb.cgi?p=binutils-gdb.git;...

-- 
Joel Brobecker

Read more

GNU Debugger 10.1 Released With BPF Debugging

  • GNU Debugger 10.1 Released With BPF Debugging, Debuginfod Support

    GDB 10.1 is now shipping as a big update to the GNU Debugger.

    GDB 10.1 adds support for (e)BPF debugging as the new target supported by this release. The GDB server also now supports RISC-V GNU/Linux and ARC GNU/Linux.

    Making GDB 10.1 exciting is that there is experimental multi-target debugging support as well as support for debuginfod. Debuginfod is the HTTP server for distributing ELF/DWARF debugging information from a centralized server.

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