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Linux 5.10 rc1 Released as Long Term Support Kernel

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Linux

Linux 5.10 rc1 released as Long Term Support (LTS) Kernel. Linux Kernel 5.10 will be LTS after the earlier LTS Kernel 5.4.
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Linux 5.10 Is The Next LTS Kernel

  • Linux 5.10 Is The Next LTS Kernel - Phoronix

    While there had been much speculation that Linux 5.9 would be the kernel's next long-term support release based on past timing, Linux 5.10 is going to be the LTS release.

    Greg Kroah-Hartman who is the main stable maintainer for the Linux kernel confirmed at the Linux Foundation's Open-Source Summit Europe that Linux 5.10 will be the LTS release.

    Linux 5.10-rc1 released yesterday and should debut as stable by mid-December. This kernel will then be maintained for the years ahead under the Linux LTS program.

Linux 5.10 will be the next long-term support Linux kernel

  • Linux 5.10 will be the next long-term support Linux kernel

    Even many Linux users aren't aware that there are many different kinds of Linux kernels. Sure, there's the eternal release candidate kernels, which Linus Torvalds is perpetually working on, but then there are the ones we use every day on our desktops, servers, and clouds. Of these, the most important one for hardware designers and programmers are the long-term support (LTS) kernels. So, when their chief maintainer, Linux kernel developer and leader Greg Kroah-Hartman, says, "#Linux 5.10 will be the next Longterm (aka LTS) #kernel (and thus supported for at least two years, but, in the end, it often is six)." It's a big deal.

    There's nothing that special about the forthcoming Linux 5.10 kernel. True, an ancient memory feature, which dates back to when 286 processors hummed inside out computers, have been taken out. But, so far, there are no important new features, such as Linux 5.6's WireGuard, included. We can expect 5.10 to see the light of day in December 2020.

Linux Kernel 5.10 Will be the Next LTS Release...

  • Linux Kernel 5.10 Will be the Next LTS Release and it has Some Exciting Improvements Lined Up - It's FOSS

    Development for Linux Kernel 5.10 is in progress. It’s been confirmed to be a long term support release and it will be bringing newer hardware support among other promised features.

    Linux Kernel 5.10 will be Long Term Support Release

    Greg Kroah-Hartman, the key stable kernel maintainer, addressed an “Ask the Expert” session at Linux Foundation’s Open-Source Summit Europe and confirmed that Linux 5.10 will be the next LTS release.

    Even though there were some early speculations of 5.9 being the LTS release, Greg clarified that the last kernel release of the year will always be an LTS release.

    As of now, Linux Kernel 5.4 series happens to be the latest LTS version out there which added a lot of improvements and hardware support. Also, considering the development progress with Linux Kernel 5.8 being the biggest release so far and Linux 5.10’s first release candidate being close to it, there’s a lot of things going on under the hood.

Upcoming Linux 5.10 release will love you longterm

  • Upcoming Linux 5.10 release will love you longterm, pushing support out to 2026

    It's official. The upcoming Linux 5.10 kernel is destined to become the next "longterm maintenance" release for the open-source operating system.

    The news was dropped by longtime maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman during an "Ask the Experts" session at the Open Source Summit Europe.

    The first release candidate of 5.10 popped up a few days earlier, with the removal of an elderly addressing tool and tweaks aplenty (including kicking the Y2K38 problem down the road by a few centuries).

By FOSSlife Team

  • Linux 5.10 Will Be a Long-Term Support Kernel

    Linux kernel developer and maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced that "#Linux 5.10 will be the next Longterm (aka LTS) #kernel (and thus supported for at least two years, but, in the end, it often is six)."

By Paul Hill (late)

  • [Older] Linux 5.10 set to become the next Long-Term Support kernel

    Speaking at the Linux Foundation’s virtual Open-Source Summit Europe, the Linux kernel maintainer for the stable branch, Greg Kroah-Hartman, unveiled that Linux 5.10 will be the next Long-Term Support (LTS) release. The existing LTS kernel is Linux 5.4 which was released in November 2019 and receives updates until December 2025.

    Going by the last two LTS kernel releases, it’s expected that Linux 5.10 will be tended to until December 2026. The first release candidate of Linux 5.10 was released this past weekend and with several more to come, we should expect the stable version sometime in December.

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