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Ubuntu publisher, Samsung, Huawei join major open-source security initiative

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OSS
Security

Security has always been of utmost importance to the entire open source ecosystem.

Eric S. Raymond, one of the luminaries of the open source movement, in his famous essay, Cathedral and the Bazaar, wrote “given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow.” While still true, the complexity of software, and the increasing number of collaborators, puts an increasing onus on the eyeballs hunting for vulnerabilities.

In addition to well-defined security policies at a project level, virtually all of the top organisations that contribute to open source software have security initiatives of their own.

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Open Source Security Foundation Announces Education Courses...

  • Open Source Security Foundation Announces Education Courses and Participation Initiatives to Advance its Commitment to Securing the World’s Software Infrastructure

    OpenSSF, a cross-industry collaboration to secure the open source ecosystem, today announced free training for developing secure software, a new OpenSSF professional certificate program called Secure Software Development Fundamentals and additional program and technical initiatives. It is also announcing new contributors to the Foundation and newly elected advisory council and governing board members.

    Open source software has become pervasive across industries, and ensuring its security is of primary importance. The OpenSSF, hosted at the Linux Foundation, provides a structured forum for a collaborative, cross-industry effort. The foundation is committed to working both upstream and with existing communities to advance open source security for all.

Microsoft Inside

  • OpenSSF and Linux Foundation offer 3 free courses on developing secure open source software - TechRepublic [Ed: OpenSSF already infiltrated and now headed by Microsoft (the NSA back doors giant ), so Linux Foundation is a total farce]

    Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF), hosted at the Linux Foundation, announced on Thursday that it is offering free training for developing secure software as well as adding a new certification and providing program and technical initiatives.

    OpenSSF is a cross-industry collaboration to secure the open source ecosystem. Open source software is available across all industries and making sure it is secure is more important than ever before.

  • OpenSSF Introduces Free Courses On How To Develop Secure Software

    OpenSSF has also elected Kay Williams from Microsoft as Governing Board Chair. The election for the Security Community Individual Representative to the Governing Board is currently underway and results will be announced by OpenSSF in November.

    Ryan Haning from Microsoft has been elected Chair of the Technical Advisory Council (TAC).

  • Open Source Security Foundation launches a new certification program on edX

    One final note, the OpenSSF is incorporating the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) projects. CII has been working on securing older, popular open-source programs, which were not receiving enough funding. These programs include the CII Census, a quantitative analysis to identify critical OSS projects; CII Best Practices badge project; and the CII FOSS Contributor Survey, a quantitative survey of OSS developers. Both will become part of the OpenSSF Securing Critical Projects working group. These efforts will continue to be implemented by the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard (LISH).

SUSE joins OpenSSF as Trustworthy Security Drives Innovation

  • SUSE joins OpenSSF as Trustworthy Security Drives Innovation

    Today, we’re proud to announce that SUSE has joined the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF). As open source becomes the backbone of digital transformation, its security is ever more essential. In OpenSSF, the open source community collaborates on vulnerability disclosures and security tooling, and it creates best practices to keep all users of open source solutions safe.

Arduino joins the Open Source Security Foundation

  • Arduino joins the Open Source Security Foundation

    As an open-source project, Arduino has always considered security a top priority: making tools and products easy to use for our community has consistently been as important as making them secure.

    Today, we are excited to announce that Arduino has joined the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSFF), the collaborative cross-industry effort to secure the open-source ecosystem.

    Hosted at the Linux Foundation, the OpenSFF brings together the efforts of the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) and GitHub’s Open Source Security Coalition and is committed to working both upstream and with existing communities to advance the security of open-source software. The foundation will initially include technical initiatives and working groups that will address vulnerability disclosures, security tooling, security best practices, and the identification of security threats to the open-source project.

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