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Chromium Browser Now Officially Available in Linux Mint and LMDE, Here’s How to Install It

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Linux

After making it hard for users to install the Chromium web browser on their distributions by deciding to drop support for Ubuntu’s Snap universal packages with the Linux Mint 20 release onwards, the Linux Mint developers are now packaging Chromium and distributing it trough the official repos.

Chromium is not only available in Linux Mint, but also in the Debian spin LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition). Users can now easily install the open-source web browser with a few mouse clicks. Depending on the edition you’re using (Cinnamon, MATE or Xfce), all you have to do is open the Software Manager and install Chromium.

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Linux Mint Now Packaging Their Own Chromium

  • Linux Mint Now Packaging Their Own Chromium, Developing New IPTV Player

    With this month's Ubuntu/Debian-based Linux Mint development news there are two items worth calling attention to.

    First up, Linux Mint is finally packaging Chromium. Linux Mint previously offered Chromium when Ubuntu offered it as a Debian package prior to migrating to Chromium Snaps. Meanwhile the upstream Debian packaging for Chromium often falls well out of date. Thus Linux Mint is now packaging Google's open-source Chromium web browser on its own for users interested it in place of the official Google Chrome package or using the likes of Firefox.

    After soliciting feedback from users last month, Linux Mint has also begun developing their own IPTV player. They have begun working on it and this IPTV player is called Hypnotix. They haven't yet determined if it will be included in Linux Mint moving forward or even how much time will be devoted to the effort.

  • Monthly News – October 2020

    The Chromium browser is now available in the official repositories for both Linux Mint and LMDE. If you’ve been waiting for this I’d like to thank you for your patience.

    To guarantee reactivity and timely updates we had to automate the process of detecting, packaging and compiling new versions of Chromium. This is an application which can require more than 6 hours per build on a fast computer. We allocated a new build server with high specifications (Ryzen 9 3900, 128GB RAM, NMVe) and reduced the time it took to build Chromium to a little more than an hour.

    Although Chromium was present in Debian we noticed it was rarely up to date so the decision was taken to also build for LMDE. We had to adapt a few things and there were hurdles along the way but it’s finally here.

    The package name is the same in Linux Mint and LMDE: “chromium”.

Linux Mint re-adds Chromium to its official repositories

  • Linux Mint re-adds Chromium to its official repositories

    Clem Lefebvre, head of the Linux Mint project, has shared some of the project's developments for October. He announced that the Chromium browser is now available from official repositories on Linux Mint and LMDE after it was previously removed and that the project has started work on an IPTV player.

    During the development of Linux Mint 20, you may remember that the Linux Mint team was angry about Chromium’s snapd requirement added by Canonical - the maintainers of Ubuntu. In response, it replaced the Chromium package with a dummy package forcing users to download it from other places. To remedy this, the Linux Mint team has decided to begin providing Chromium builds on its own.

Linux Mint developers foolishly waste resources on IPTV player

  • Linux Mint developers foolishly waste resources on IPTV player called 'Hypnotix'

    Linux Mint is a great Ubuntu-based operating system, although there have been concerns about the project's financing and the morale of the developers. Over time, the small development team made some wise decisions, such as killing the KDE variant of the operating system. I think they should kill the Mate and Xfce versions and focus strictly on Cinnamon, but I digress.

    Sadly, the team seems ready to make another poor decision, foolishly wasting its limited resources on an IPTV player for some reason. Called "Hypnotix," no one was asking for such a thing from the Mint Team, and it isn't clear why they are bothering. While only a "prototype" (aka Alpha) application for now, the developers are considering making it a part of Linux Mint. But why?

Mayank Sharma with headline identical to ZDNet's

  • Linux Mint introduces its own take on the Chromium web browser

    The popular Linux Mint distribution has decided to compile and package the open source Chromium browser on its own, instead of relying on upstream versions from Ubuntu or Debian.

    The move is the latest in the disagreements between Mint’s lead-developer, Clement "Clem" Lefebvre, and the Ubuntu distribution, on which Linux Mint is based.

    Linux Mint is what is known as a downstream distribution, and is affected by any changes to its upstream distribution, Ubuntu. It takes significant engineering efforts for downstream distros to ignore changes in their upstream projects.

Linux Mint Unveils New Packages

  • Linux Mint Unveils New Packages

    The Linux Mint team has announced it'll bring an official Chromium package to the distribution

    For those who prefer their Linux a bit mintier, but aren’t terribly keen on everything installed via snap, the developers of Linux Mint have announced they’ll be bringing an official Chromium package to the next release of the distribution (20.1, aka Ulyssa). Unlike some Ubuntu-based distributions, Linux Mint users will be able to install Chromium from the traditional apt repositories, instead of having to go with the snap package (which is blocked by default). That installation is as simple as sudo apt-get install chromium -y.

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