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FSF Giving Guide: It's the thought that counts, so think freedom

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GNU

Even though we're still in the midst of the pandemic, the holiday season is upon us, and with it comes the time people around the world give gifts to show their appreciation. Companies are starting their sales early this year, and as usual are focusing heavily on tech gifts. But before you buy anything, you should make sure that that gift isn't putting your friend or family member under unjust control.

Each year, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) publishes a new version of our Ethical Tech Giving Guide as a way to help concerned individuals make sure that the presents they plan on giving their loved ones don't come with dangerous consequences for their freedom. Many of these devices have been through our Respects Your Freedom (RYF) certification program, meaning that they and the retailers that offer them have been held to the highest scrutiny when it comes to matters of software freedom.

In the last year, some of the devices on this list have become scarcer, highlighting the pressing need for more hardware that is compatible with a fully free system. Some devices we recommend may only be available from a certain retailer. While it may not be readily available in local stores, offering a gift like the Libiquity Taurinus X200 is perfect for someone who has just become aware of free software's importance and is interested in going further, or for the free software activist in your life who would love for you to support a company trying to do the right thing. Even better, by avoiding popular but ethically unacceptable devices from manufacturers like Apple, you're letting your loved ones know that you care about them too much to compromise their freedom. By choosing a device like the upcoming Librem 5 mobile phone from the Giving Guide, you're walking a different path from everyone else, choosing the road to freedom instead of subjugation.

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