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Audiocasts/Shows/Videos: Linux in the Ham Shack and More

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  • LHS Episode #380: The Weekender LXI | Linux in the Ham Shack

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Parler, Ownership, and Open Source

    Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, Petros Koutoupis, and Kyle Rankin talk Parler and platform lock-in, the concept of data, software, and hardware ownership, and the open source social contract.

  • Neovim Vs Vim: What's The Difference in 2020 - YouTube

    There's lot's of user for both vim and neovim but one thing that doesn't get answered to often is how they actually differ, in the past the gap was considerably wider but as time has gone on the difference has become a bit more subtle but still important.

  • Linux Users Deserve Better From AMD - YouTube

    Where's OUR Linux review of the new AMD Radeon RX 6800 graphics cards? Jason and Schykle explain why it's not coming any time soon, and why AMD MUST do better to prepare popular Linux distros and their users for the newest hardware launches.

  • 3 Concepts to Master for DevOps/SRE Interviews

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13 Best Free and Open Source Python Microframeworks

One of the types of software that’s important for a web developer is the web framework. A framework “is a code library that makes a developer’s life easier when building reliable, scalable, and maintainable web applications” by providing reusable code or extensions for common operations. By saving development time, developers can concentrate on application logic rather than mundane elements. A web framework offers the developer a choice about how to solve a specific problem. By using a framework, a developer lets the framework control portions of their application. While it’s perfectly possible to code a web application without using a framework, it’s more practical to use one. Read more

Customize Task Switching Experience on GNOME Desktop With These Nifty Tools

Unless you’re new to Linux, you know that there are several popular desktop environment choices for users. And if you’re that newbie, I recommend you to learn what a desktop environment is along with this tutorial. Here, I shall be focusing on tweaking the task switching experience on GNOME. I know that the majority of users just tend to use it as is and stock settings are good enough for the most part. I mean there is nothing wrong with the application switcher that you use with Alt+Tab keyboard shortcut in Ubuntu. Read more

How to Install Arch Linux [Beginner's Guide]

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Valve Backs Zink Work

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Don’t Call It A Comeback

    I guess I never left, really, since I’ve been vicariously living the life of someone who still writes zink patches through reviewing and discussing some great community efforts that are ongoing. But now I’m back living that life of someone who writes zink patches. Valve has generously agreed to sponsor my work on graphics-related projects. For the time being, that work happens to be zink.

  • Valve Now Funding Blumenkrantz - Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan To Continue

    Longtime open-source developer Mike Blumenkrantz who has been an Enlightenment developer for many years and was working for Samsung's Open-Source Group prior to its demise jumped into the open-source Linux graphics world this year. While being unemployed he began hacking on the Zink Gallium3D code that allows generic OpenGL acceleration over the Vulkan API. He quickly got the code to the point of OpenGL 4.6 support and quite compelling performance compared to where Zink was at earlier this year. Now it turns out he will continue with his Linux graphics adventures thanks to funding from Valve. Mike Blumenkrantz shared today that Valve is going to be sponsoring his graphics-related work moving forward. At least for now, that Linux graphics work is still on the matter of Zink.