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FSF: IDAD, LibrePlanet, High Priority Projects and More

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GNU
  • International Day Against DRM (IDAD) 2020

    This year's annual day in protest of Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) will be on December 4th, 2020, and will focus on streaming services' unjust use of DRM. We need your help to spread that message far and wide to both anti-DRM activists and those simply concerned with how in a world with continued technological advancement, our digital freedoms are increasingly under threat.

  • Copyright reform activist Julia Reda to keynote FSF's LibrePlanet, March 20 & 21, 2021

    Julia Reda is the first keynote to be confirmed for the 2021 edition of the LibrePlanet conference. Reda is a former European Parliament member who is well known for her work on copyright reform and net neutrality. She is an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, and a Shuttleworth Foundation fellow. Currently, Julia Reda leads the fundamental rights litigation project "control ©" at the German Society for Civil Rights.

    Reda will discuss the need for public funding for free software projects from different governments around the world. She notes, "The recent decision by Trump to defund the Open Technology Fund has highlighted the dangers of a public funding landscape for public interest technology that relies too heavily on a single government, whose priorities could change rapidly at any time." Reda believes funding should be decentralized to avoid single points of failure, and is currently working on establishing a European or German framework for free (as in freedom) technology funding.

  • LibrePlanet 2021: Join us online on March 20 & 21 with keynote Julia Reda

    Mark your calendars: LibrePlanet 2021: Empowering Users will be held on March 20 and 21, 2021. For those of you who haven't been to the LibrePlanet conference before: expect a friendly, social, community-focused event with two days of inspiring talks and workshops from some of the most active and inspiring people in the free software community.

  • FSF calls for community participation to help update High Priority Free Software Projects list

    The High Priority Free Software Projects (HPP) initiative draws attention to areas of development and specific projects of strategic importance to the goal of freedom for all computer users. The HPP list helps guide volunteers, developers, funders, and companies to projects where their skills and resources can be utilized, whether they be in coding, graphic design, writing, financial contributions, or activism.

    Longtime committee member Benjamin Mako Hill said previously that an "updated High Priority Projects list is a description of the most important threats, and most critical opportunities, that free software faces in the modern computing landscape." As computing is more ubiquitous than ever, the HPP list reflects ongoing changes in priorities for the free software movement.

  • Committee begins review of High Priority Projects free software list

    The High Priority Free Software Projects (HPP) initiative draws attention to areas of improvement to the HPP list and specific projects of great strategic importance to the goal of freedom for all computer users. Longtime committee member Benjamin Mako Hill said previously that an "updated High Priority Projects list is a description of the most important threats, and most critical opportunities, that free software faces in the modern computing landscape." As computing is more ubiquitous than ever, the HPP list must reflect ongoing changes in priorities for the free software movement. The committee is starting the new process of updating the HPP, and we need your input.

    Fifteen years ago, the first version of the HPP list debuted with only four projects, three of them related to Java. Eighteen months later, Sun began to free Java users, proving the strength of advocacy campaigns for free software. Another example of the effectiveness of the list is when the HPP list called for a donor and contact management system, which was then promptly acted on by the developers of CiviCRM, who delivered the database management system that is currently still in use by the FSF and more than eleven thousand other nonprofit or governmental organizations. The list's persuasive powers can help guide existing projects, developers looking for a new project, investors, and volunteers to direct their focus toward those projects that will deliver the greatest benefit to user freedom.

  • Intern blog: Journeying into the free software world

    Hello, my name is Daniel Katz! I am beginning my internship with the FSF in the fall of 2020, where I will start by converting the sites used to draft the GNU General Public License version 3 (GPLv3), mostly https://gplv3.fsf.org, into a static Web site that can be themed into a historical archive. I began my relationship with the FSF a few years back when I realized the need for free software, but did not have the technical skills to contribute to community projects. As such, I started by volunteering with the Licensing & Compliance team to digitize legal documents, and writing about free software in my school’s magazines.

    I started programming the summer before high school, where I taught myself Java in order to take the AP Computer Science A exam. From there, I learned Python, my current language of choice, and dove into the world of free software, doing everything from teaching to competitive programming. Recently, I worked on a project that used sentiment analysis and Twitter to get a feel of how people around the US are feeling about the coronavirus. I run GNU/Linux on my desktop and laptop.

  • FSF35 videos online: Find them on PeerTube and MediaGoblin

    On October 9th, 2020, we ended the Free Software Foundation's (FSF) birthday week with an online anniversary event featuring both live and prerecorded segments. We were honored to have guests from different free software fields join us live for the celebration of the coral anniversary, and we were so thankful to receive prerecorded birthday messages from people in every corner of the world.

    Many supporters asked us after the birthday celebration was over if the exciting sessions we hosted would be available online. So many community members made such valuable and fascinating contributions, and we didn't want you to miss out! Plus, the free software community is a global one, and between international members and American members who couldn't take time out of a work day, there are plenty of people who wanted to participate but weren't able.

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Valve Backs Zink Work

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Don’t Call It A Comeback

    I guess I never left, really, since I’ve been vicariously living the life of someone who still writes zink patches through reviewing and discussing some great community efforts that are ongoing. But now I’m back living that life of someone who writes zink patches. Valve has generously agreed to sponsor my work on graphics-related projects. For the time being, that work happens to be zink.

  • Valve Now Funding Blumenkrantz - Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan To Continue

    Longtime open-source developer Mike Blumenkrantz who has been an Enlightenment developer for many years and was working for Samsung's Open-Source Group prior to its demise jumped into the open-source Linux graphics world this year. While being unemployed he began hacking on the Zink Gallium3D code that allows generic OpenGL acceleration over the Vulkan API. He quickly got the code to the point of OpenGL 4.6 support and quite compelling performance compared to where Zink was at earlier this year. Now it turns out he will continue with his Linux graphics adventures thanks to funding from Valve. Mike Blumenkrantz shared today that Valve is going to be sponsoring his graphics-related work moving forward. At least for now, that Linux graphics work is still on the matter of Zink.