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Games: CLI, Tristam Island, GamerOS and Much More

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Gaming
  • Best Command Line Games for Linux – Linux Hint

    This article will list various command line games available for Linux. These games do not require you to commit a lot of time and can be played in short bursts. If you are using a lightweight Linux distribution with minimal UI elements or using a headless OS based on Linux, this list should be useful for you.

  • Tristam Island is a Infocom-inspired text adventure available on over 30 platforms | GamingOnLinux

    Okay, now this is quite impressive. Tristam Island is a text adventure designed like old Infocom works and it's playable across more platforms than you might expect.

    Developed by Hugo Labrande using modern, open source tools on Linux naturally it has first-class Linux support. However, it's also available on over 30 other platforms too. From Linux to Windows, Amiga to Spectrum and even some calculators can run it. The technical details of it are just as impressive as the adventure you go on. The developer also supplies the plain ".z3" file to run in your favourite interactive fiction interpreter. It could run pretty much anywhere.

    "After crashing your plane at sea, you end up drifting to a small island, with not much to survive. You explore, and find out the island was inhabited, years ago. But why did the people leave? And why is there a fence around the white house at the top of the hill?"

  • SteamOS-like couch gaming Linux distribution GamerOS expands with a new release | GamingOnLinux

    Need an up to date Linux distribution for your living room big screen experience? GamerOS can fill that gap for you while Valve sit on SteamOS.

    GamerOS is one of the easiest ways to get a full-screen Steam experience on a big screen, with no-fuss updates and a whole bunch of special tweaks to make it run as nicely as possible. Not only that, it has a bunch of extras to support other stores and platforms too.

    With the release of GamerOS 21 the standard components included have been upgraded like the Linux Kernel 5.9.9, Mesa 20.2.2, NVIDIA 455.38, RetroArch 1.9 and updates to their Steam Tweaks and Steam Buddy apps too. Their Steam Buddy is web-based tool you use to manage non-Steam stuff, with these release it expanded to support the Atari Jaguar and PlayStation Portable through emulators. It also now has audio controls, it will generate banner images based on game titles when one isn't available, fixes gamepads not working with the Epic Games Store and more fixes.

  • Cloud Gaming Services: Explained and Tested on Linux - Boiling Steam

    Here’s a quick test run of some of these game streaming services, and I’ll explain what they do. In particular, we’ll see how well each service fares on the desktop Linux side.

  • 340 or so days later and I am still lost in The Longing | GamingOnLinux

    Remember the unique mix of point and click adventuring with an idle game in The Longing? It's supposed to have taken people 400 days to finish and it released back in March 2020 - to which I was impressed with it.

    This is because when you start, a big timer at the top of your screen will count down from 400 real-time days. It's a painfully slow game, and one that's very much the anti-AAA shot some readers might be needing. It's all about loneliness, and the longing to know more and have more. It's such a thoroughly strange experience.

    The Longing sits between a point and click adventure with an idle game. You can walk around, interact with things and explore for a while. However, certain parts of it force you to wait. You might need something to grow or get broken before you can pass, or even just opening a big door might take an hour or two. You can just quit and come back, and time will continue on so you don't need to have it open.

  • Jedi: Fallen Order arrives on Stadia, six new free games for Stadia Pro for December | GamingOnLinux

    Google continues to boost their game selection with many fan favourites continuing to arrive on their Stadia game streaming service. They also have big plans.

    As of right now, Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order is available to buy on Stadia and it's 60% off at $23.99 / €27.99 / £23.99. The sale on that will end on December 3. They're also offering a free Stadia Premiere Edition (Controller + Chromecast Ultra) with pre-orders of Cyberpunk 2077 and I do have to admit I love the feel of my own Stadia Controller.

  • Re-live the experience of Half-Life with Black Mesa: Definitive Edition out now | GamingOnLinux

    Black Mesa: Definitive Edition is the final big update to the re-imagined fan-made Half-Life game, and it's looking pretty awesome. Easily the best way to experience the first part of Half-Life.

    Don't get me wrong, the original from Valve still has plenty of true charm but for modern audiences it's not the ideal way to try and get into it. Black Mesa (especially now with the Definitive Edition) makes it easier for a new generation to get invested into the crazy world that is Half-Life and experience the adventure of Dr. Gordon Freeman.

  • NVIDIA plan to support Linux with GeForce NOW using Chrome | GamingOnLinux

    For a while now you've been able to stream games using NVIDIA GeForce NOW in your browser, however it looks like NVIDIA will be making that a bit more official for Linux.

    Currently on certain platforms like Windows and macOS, NVIDIA have a dedicated downloadable application for their GeForce NOW streaming service. They expanded support into the browser for ChromeOS / Chromebooks in the Summer, which initially needed other platforms to spoof their browser string to ChromeOS but that hasn't been needed for a while.

  • Radeon RX 6800 Series 1440p Linux Gaming Benchmarks With 15 GPUs - Phoronix

    While the new Radeon RX 6800 series is suited for 4K gaming, a number of premium readers inquired about seeing 1440p gaming benchmarks for the cards. Now that all the initial launch coverage is out of the way, here is a look at the Radeon RX 6800 / RX 6800 XT with 15 graphics cards in total for this round of Linux gaming benchmarks focused at 1440p.

    Up for this comparison based on the cards I had available were the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060, RTX 2060 SUPER, RTX 2070 , RTX 2070 SUPER, RTX 2080, RTX 2080 SUPER, TITAN RTX, RTX 2080 Ti, and the RTX 3080 (unfortunately, the RTX 3080 remains my lone Ampere card at the moment with NVIDIA not yet sending out the RTX 3090/3070 for Linux testing). On the Radeon side is the RX 5600 XT, RX 5700, RX 5700 XT, Radeon VII, RX 6800, and RX 6800 XT.

    The very latest open-source Radeon Linux graphics drivers were used for this testing, which does incorporate the recent driver optimizations. Via the Phoronix Test Suite a variety of OpenGL and Vulkan test cases were conducted. The GPU power consumption and GPU core temperatures were also monitored on a per-test basis.

More in Tux Machines

JingOS arrives as China’s first Linux Distro, offers iPadOS-like features and functions

JingOS was built with the idea of improving the functionality and productivity of a tablet overall. So, the team behind the new operating system took inspiration from the Cupertino based giant’s iPadOS platform to offer a simple/clean, yet productive and efficient UI design that can ensure that your tablets are a mini computer that one can work on, on the go. JingOS is not only a tablet OS but a full function Linux distro. Read more

9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: January 17th, 2021

Thank you everyone for following 9to5Linux on social media; we’re nearing 6K followers on Twitter and that’s only possible thanks to you guys! Thank you again to everyone who donated so far to help me keep this website alive for as long as possible. This week has been quite interesting despite the fact that no major releases were planned. We saw the launch of a new PinePhone Linux phone edition, the release of the Flatpak 1.10 and Wine 6.0 software, and much more. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • New coalition aims to combat growing wave of ransomware attacks [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The California-based nonprofit aims to produce recommendations that will help governments and the private sector tackle the scourge of ransomware attacks.

    [Attackers] have increasingly used these types of attacks -- which involve accessing and encrypting the victim’s network and demanding payment to allow access again -- to hit major targets, with city governments in Atlanta, Baltimore and New Orleans severely impaired by ransomware attacks over the past two years.

    More recently, hospitals have become a target during the COVID-19 pandemic, with cyber criminals seeing vulnerable hospitals as easy targets more likely to pay a quick ransom as health care systems struggle to keep up with coronavirus cases. In some instances, the cyberattacks have been blamed for deaths due to delayed care.

  • This tiny shortcut can completely crash your Windows 10 device

    A zero-day exploit has been discovered that can crash your Windows 10 device – and, even more worrying, can be delivered inside a seemingly harmless shortcut file. The vulnerability can corrupt any NTFS-formatted hard drive and even be exploited by standard and low privilege user accounts.

    Security researcher Jonas Lykkegaard referenced the vulnerability on Twitter last week and had previously drawn attention to the issue on two previous occasions last year. Despite this, the NTFS vulnerability remains unpatched.

    There are various ways to trigger the vulnerability that involve trying to access the $i30 NTFS attribute on a folder in a particular way. One such exploit involves the creation of a Windows shortcut file that has its icon location set to C:\:$i30:$bitmap. Bleeping Computer found that this triggered the vulnerability even if users did not attempt to click on the file in question. Windows Explorer’s attempts to access the icon path in the background would be enough to corrupt the NTFS hard drive.

  • This Easily-Exploitable Windows 10 NTFS Bug Can Instantly Corrupt Your Hard Drives

    Jonas says that this Windows 10 bug isn't new and has been around since the release of Windows 10 April 2018 Update, and remains exploitable on the latest versions, as well. BleepingComputer shared that the problematic command includes $i30 string, a Windows NTFS Index Attribute associated with directories.

    [...]

    After running the command, Windows 10 will start displaying prompts to restart the device and repair the corrupted drive. Apparently, the issue also impacts some Windows XP versions and similar NTFS bugs have been known for years but are yet to be addressed by the Windows maker.

  • Nidhi Razdan, Phishing, And Three Hard Lessons

    Nidhi Razdan, a career journalist, became a victim of an elaborate phishing attack that made her quit her 21-year-old job and part with many of her personal details.

  • Windows Finger command abused by phishing to download malware

    Attackers are using the normally harmless Windows Finger command to download and install a malicious backdoor on victims' devices. The 'Finger' command is a utility that originated in Linux/Unix operating systems that allows a local user to retrieve a list of users on a remote machine or information about a particular remote user. In addition to Linux, Windows includes a finger.exe command that performs the same functionality.

Security Auditing Tools For Ubuntu

Malware, where aren’t thou found? Well, even our wonderful Ubuntu can be infected. So what can we do about it? Hope and pray we keep our system safe and better yet, audit our systems regularly for malwares and rootkits. There are 4 system auditors for Ubuntu that we will review - lynis, rkhunter, chkrootkit, and clamav. [...] Oddly enough, there aren’t many tools to scan for malware out there for Linux. Why? I’m not sure. However, these 4 tools are more than enough to detect malwares, rootkits, and viruses. Read more Also: Windows Finger command abused by phishing to download malware