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Rust 1.49.0 Released and Related News

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  • Announcing Rust 1.49.0

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.49.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 371
  • Niko Matsakis: The more things change… [Ed: Rust language is becoming GAFAM surveillance monopolies, hosted on Microsoft servers]

    That said, I’ve talked to a number of people in the Rust community who feel nervous about this change. After all, we’ve worked hard to build an open source organization that values curiosity, broad collaboration, and uplifting others. As more companies form Rust teams, there’s a chance that some of that could be lost, even if everyone has the best of intentions. While we all want to see more people paid to work on Rust, that can also result in “part time” contributors feeling edged out.

    [...]

    I want to zoom out a bit to the broader picture. As I said in the intro, we are entering a new phase for Rust, one where there are multiple active Rust teams at different companies, all working as part of the greater Rust community to build and support Rust. This is something to celebrate. I think it will go a long way towards making Rust development more sustainable for everyone.

    Even as we celebrate, it’s worth recognizing that in many ways this exciting future is already here. Supporting Rust doesn’t require forming a full-time Rust team. The Google Fuchsia team, for example, has always made a point of not only using Rust but actively contributing to the community. Ferrous Microsystems has a number of folks who work within the Rust compiler and embedded teams. In truth, there are a lot of employers who give their employees time to work on Rust – way too many to list, even if I knew all their names. Then we have companies like Embark and others that actively fund work on their dependencies (shout-out to cargo-fund, an awesome tool developed by the equally awesome azfoltzer, who – as it happens – works at Fastly, another company that has been an active supporter of Rust).

Rust 1.49 Released With 64-bit ARM Linux Support Rated Tier-1

  • Rust 1.49 Released With 64-bit ARM Linux Support Rated Tier-1

    Rust 1.49 has promoted their 64-bit ARM Linux support to being a Tier-1 target, which is the highest support guarantee and on par with the likes of Rust's x86_64 support. Rust has long worked well on 64-bit ARM Linux but is now considered to be in great shape and put at the highest tier. This also makes 64-bit ARM Linux the first non-x86 target to reach a tier one level.

Rust 1.49.0 released

  • Rust 1.49.0 released

    On this last day of 2020, the Rust project has announced the release of version 1.49.0 of the programming language. It establishes the arm64 Linux target as a Tier 1 platform, which is the highest level of support; "Tier 1 platforms can be thought of as 'guaranteed to work'". Also, arm64 macOS and Windows have risen to Tier 2 status, which means they are guaranteed to build and are likely to work just fine, but the automated tests are not run. Beyond that, the test framework now captures output from multiple threads and some library changes were made. See the detailed release notes for more information.

Feeling a little Rusty? v1.49 arrives just in time for new year’

  • Feeling a little Rusty? v1.49 arrives just in time for new year’s, elbows language onto 64-bit Arm

    As usual, the Rust language update also includes a new release of Cargo. This time, Rust’s package manager has learned to build independently reproducible crates with cargo-package, and accept glob patterns for package and target specifications. Version 1.49 also includes a new build-time environment variable called CARGO_PRIMARY_PACKAGE for indicating “root packages requested on the command-line”. This is meant to be especially helpful when using the –fix flag, since it can let lint collection clippy know when to not emit lints to reduce problems in that particular scenario.

    Speaking of clippy, the collection gained a variety of false positive fixes, and 17 new lints since the last release to help finding issues like loops with just one element, inefficient calls to Mutex::lock, or the integration of less than ideal methods. The lint for identifying drop_bounds has been uplifted into rustc and was therefore deprecated in clippy, while single_char_push_str was renamed to single_char_add_str and zero_width_space is now known as invisible_characters. Developers looking for string_lit_as_bytes or rc_buffer will need to turn to nursery or restriction respectively, as those lints have been moved there.

    Before making the switch to Rust 1.49, a brief look into the compatibility notes is advised, since changes in the stripping of whitespaces in comments or treatment of macros ending in semi-colons might lead to slightly different behaviour of old programs.

Rust 1.49 Released with Tier-1 Support of 64-Bit ARM Linux

  • Rust 1.49 Released with Tier-1 Support of 64-Bit ARM Linux

    The Rust team released on the eve of the last year Rust 1.49. The new version of Rust features 64-bit ARM support and minor language enhancements.

    [...]

    The new version of Rust promotes the aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu target to Tier 1 support. This means that developers using 64-bit ARM systems with Linux have the assurance that a full test-suite has been run for every change merged into the compiler. Prebuilt binaries are also made available. The team expects that the 64-bit ARM support will benefit workloads spanning from embedded to desktops and servers.

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