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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • XTerm: It's Better Than You Thought

    A couple months back I switched my terminal from xfce4-terminal to the venerable xterm. For some reason I always put xterm in the same bucket as xclock, xmessage, or any other prehistoric command starting with X that comes pre-installed on any graphical Linux distribution.

    It was surprising to learn that xterm is still very much actively developed. Even more surprisingly, it turns out xterm has incredibly low input latency compared to modern terminals. This is easy to test at home, try typing in xterm compared to any other terminal and feel how much snappier it is.

    The lower latency alone is worth the price of admission in my opinion, so I went about configuring xterm as my default terminal. The configuration goes in ~/.Xresources and you need to run xrdb ~/.Xresources after every change, or make vim do it.

  • How to install ClassiCube on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install ClassiCube on a Chromebook. It is a sandbox block game inspired by Minecraft Classic. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

    This tutorial will only work on Chromebooks with an Intel or AMD CPU (with Linux Apps Support) and not those with an ARM64 architecture CPU.

  • How to install Kodi 18.8 on Linux Mint 20.1 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Kodi 18.8 on Linux Mint 20.1.

  • How to download webcomics from the command line on Linux

    Would you like to back up all the strips of your favorite website? Hopefully, the open source community has the solution: a command line program to download all your favorite webcomics from your terminal.

  • How to Safely Uninstall Ubuntu in a Windows Dual-boot PC | FOSS Linux

    Previously, We covered a post on How to dual-boot Windows and Ubuntu on the same PC. We also went further and looked at How to dual-boot two Linux distributions like Fedora and Ubuntu. This post will look at something around the same line but a little different.

  • How to mount Google Drive on Linux

    In the past, close to 30K people signed up for a online petition, desperately wanting to have an official native Linux client for Google Drive, and yet their voice is still being ignored by Google. Perhaps when it comes to boosting their bottom line, Linux desktop market is not a priority for Google.

    They can ignore Linux desktop market all they want, but they cannot ignore the power of FOSS. Faced with the frustration, the open-source community respondded, producing unofficial Google Drive clients such as Grive or SyncDrive. These clients are file synchronization tools which sync files and folders between local file system and remote Google Drive. As such, you cannot mount Google Drive using these tools.

  • How To Customize Your WordPress Login Page - Anto Online

    Let’s face it! The default WordPress login page is quite bland. If you have some impressive stuff on your site, then showing the WordPress form is a bad first impression. The login form should at least reflect the greatness that the users are about to experience. Let us take a look at how you can customize the WordPress login page!

    Besides, using the default WordPress login page shows that you are lazy or ordinary. This is a bad sign, especially when you want people to trust you. The good news is that customizing the login page is easy since it can be done with plugins’ help.

  • Fedora 33 : Install wordpress on Fedora distro.

    For those who are celebrating the winter holidays with the Linux operating system, I have created this little tutorial...
    The first step - update and upgrade the Fedora 33 Linux distro.

  • Efficiently Manage Remote SSH Connections With These Linux Commands
  • How To Install A New Desktop Environment Using Raspberry PI OS

    The default desktop environment for the Raspberry PI OS is a good place to start when you first get your Raspberry PI but there are lots of other choices available.

    A desktop environment encompasses every visual aspect of your computer from the backgrounds, to the way windows appear and are managed, the panels, icons and in many cases a set of default applications.

    Thus far unless you have followed my guide for customising the Raspberry PI desktop your desktop experience will consist of a panel at the top, a single wastebasket icon on the desktop and a menu that pulls down from the top left and a series of system tray icons in the top right.

    There are many different desktop environments available and with Raspberry PI OS there is a fairly straight forward way to install the most popular ones.

  • Pi4 slow USB drive fixed

    I have posted about extreme sluggishness of EasyOS on the Raspberry Pi4, and fixes:
    https://bkhome.org/news/202101/easyos-64-bit-running-faster-in-pi4.html
    Unfortunately, that is not the end of the story. Bootup is slow, the desktop drive icons are very slow to load, and other drive-related operations are very slow. A bit of online research on Pi forums revealed the cause -- "USB attached SCSI" (CONFIG_UAS) is enabled in the kernel.
    UAS makes UAS-enabled SSDs go faster, however, it seems to be broken, even on some supposedly UAS-enabled SSDs. I do recall this issue, and EasyOS kernels for x86_64 PCs have CONFIG_UAS disabled.

More in Tux Machines

JingOS arrives as China’s first Linux Distro, offers iPadOS-like features and functions

JingOS was built with the idea of improving the functionality and productivity of a tablet overall. So, the team behind the new operating system took inspiration from the Cupertino based giant’s iPadOS platform to offer a simple/clean, yet productive and efficient UI design that can ensure that your tablets are a mini computer that one can work on, on the go. JingOS is not only a tablet OS but a full function Linux distro. Read more

9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: January 17th, 2021

Thank you everyone for following 9to5Linux on social media; we’re nearing 6K followers on Twitter and that’s only possible thanks to you guys! Thank you again to everyone who donated so far to help me keep this website alive for as long as possible. This week has been quite interesting despite the fact that no major releases were planned. We saw the launch of a new PinePhone Linux phone edition, the release of the Flatpak 1.10 and Wine 6.0 software, and much more. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • New coalition aims to combat growing wave of ransomware attacks [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The California-based nonprofit aims to produce recommendations that will help governments and the private sector tackle the scourge of ransomware attacks.

    [Attackers] have increasingly used these types of attacks -- which involve accessing and encrypting the victim’s network and demanding payment to allow access again -- to hit major targets, with city governments in Atlanta, Baltimore and New Orleans severely impaired by ransomware attacks over the past two years.

    More recently, hospitals have become a target during the COVID-19 pandemic, with cyber criminals seeing vulnerable hospitals as easy targets more likely to pay a quick ransom as health care systems struggle to keep up with coronavirus cases. In some instances, the cyberattacks have been blamed for deaths due to delayed care.

  • This tiny shortcut can completely crash your Windows 10 device

    A zero-day exploit has been discovered that can crash your Windows 10 device – and, even more worrying, can be delivered inside a seemingly harmless shortcut file. The vulnerability can corrupt any NTFS-formatted hard drive and even be exploited by standard and low privilege user accounts.

    Security researcher Jonas Lykkegaard referenced the vulnerability on Twitter last week and had previously drawn attention to the issue on two previous occasions last year. Despite this, the NTFS vulnerability remains unpatched.

    There are various ways to trigger the vulnerability that involve trying to access the $i30 NTFS attribute on a folder in a particular way. One such exploit involves the creation of a Windows shortcut file that has its icon location set to C:\:$i30:$bitmap. Bleeping Computer found that this triggered the vulnerability even if users did not attempt to click on the file in question. Windows Explorer’s attempts to access the icon path in the background would be enough to corrupt the NTFS hard drive.

  • This Easily-Exploitable Windows 10 NTFS Bug Can Instantly Corrupt Your Hard Drives

    Jonas says that this Windows 10 bug isn't new and has been around since the release of Windows 10 April 2018 Update, and remains exploitable on the latest versions, as well. BleepingComputer shared that the problematic command includes $i30 string, a Windows NTFS Index Attribute associated with directories.

    [...]

    After running the command, Windows 10 will start displaying prompts to restart the device and repair the corrupted drive. Apparently, the issue also impacts some Windows XP versions and similar NTFS bugs have been known for years but are yet to be addressed by the Windows maker.

  • Nidhi Razdan, Phishing, And Three Hard Lessons

    Nidhi Razdan, a career journalist, became a victim of an elaborate phishing attack that made her quit her 21-year-old job and part with many of her personal details.

  • Windows Finger command abused by phishing to download malware

    Attackers are using the normally harmless Windows Finger command to download and install a malicious backdoor on victims' devices. The 'Finger' command is a utility that originated in Linux/Unix operating systems that allows a local user to retrieve a list of users on a remote machine or information about a particular remote user. In addition to Linux, Windows includes a finger.exe command that performs the same functionality.

Security Auditing Tools For Ubuntu

Malware, where aren’t thou found? Well, even our wonderful Ubuntu can be infected. So what can we do about it? Hope and pray we keep our system safe and better yet, audit our systems regularly for malwares and rootkits. There are 4 system auditors for Ubuntu that we will review - lynis, rkhunter, chkrootkit, and clamav. [...] Oddly enough, there aren’t many tools to scan for malware out there for Linux. Why? I’m not sure. However, these 4 tools are more than enough to detect malwares, rootkits, and viruses. Read more Also: Windows Finger command abused by phishing to download malware