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PinePhone Mobian, Librem 14, and More

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Linux

  • PinePhone Mobian Community Edition goes up for pre-order Jan 18

    The next version of the PinePhone to ship will be the PinePhone Mobian Community Edition. It goes up for pre-order from the Pine64 Store January 18

    It’ll sell for $150 and up and the phone will ship with the Debian-based Mobian operating system pre-installed.

    [...]

    The Mobian build that will ship with the PinePhone Mobian Community Edition uses a mainline Linux kernel with some patches to ensure support for the phone’s hardware and the Phosh user interface.

    Like most mobile Linux projects, Mobian is still very much a work in progress. But it already supports all of the PinePhone’s key hardware including 4G LTE, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, cameras, and USB. You can use it to make phone calls, surf the web, install and run applications, and it supports deep sleep.

  • January Update: Happy New Gear!

    Happy New Year everyone! Let us all hope that the difficulties brought about by the COVID-19 virus are now waning and that more aspects of our lives will return to normal soon. 

    We start this year with announcing the last community edition of the PinePhone, an update on the Quartz64 single board computers, and with some good news regarding PineTab and Pinebook Pro production.  

    You can watch a synopsis of this month’s community update on Youtube (embedded below) but also on LBRY and Peertube. Stay up-to-date with PINE64 news and make sure to subscribe to this blog (bottom of the webpage), follow PINE64 Telegram News channel as well as our Twitter and Mastodon.

  • Lilbits: Linux phones and laptops, S-Pen for more phones, and an RK3566 single-board computer

    Pine64, the company behind a line of geeky, inexpensive, and hackable smartphones, laptops, and single-board computers designed to run open source software tend to only publish one blog post each month. But it’s always a doozy, and the January update is no exception.

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  • Librem 14 Update: Shipping Starts in February with Extended Battery

    The Librem 14 is our dream laptop and we know many of you are looking forward to getting yours. In our last post we talked about some of the final tweaks we made that resulted in shipping being delayed until January. The bad news is that we won’t be able to start shipping Librem 14s until February, but the good news is that everyone will be getting our (as of yet unannounced) extended battery option by default! Read the rest of the article for details.

    Supply Chain Challenges

    If you talk to anyone in manufacturing they will tell you that this has been a particularly challenging year for the supply chain. Whether you are talking about toilet paper, N95 masks, rubber gloves, or semiconductors, the global pandemic has made supply chains less reliable, and lead times and shipping times incredibly unpredictable. We already ran into supply chain challenges with the Librem 14 earlier when Intel announced CPU shortages, and most recently when we were preparing the first run of production Librem 14s we hit another issue: we couldn’t get the 3-cell batteries we were planning to use until after Chinese New Year! If you are familiar with manufacturing in China, you know that the entire country essentially shuts down for weeks, so this is far from ideal. However it turns out we could get our 4-cell extended battery in time.

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  • DIN-rail net appliances supply four GbE ports

    Axiomtek unveiled two Linux-ready DIN-rail network PCs with 4x GbE ports: the compact, rugged “iNA100” runs on Apollo Lake while the Coffee Lake based “iNA600” adds a 16-GbE port L2 managed switch and an optional PCIe x8 MXM slot.

    On Dec. 30, Axiomtek announced an iNA600 networking appliance based on Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake processors. The company followed up yesterday with a much more compact iNA100 net appliance running Apollo Lake. Both systems run Linux or Windows, offer at least 4x Gigabit Ethernet ports, and can be mounted on DIN-rails.

    [...]

    The system runs a Yocto-based Linux or Win 10 on the dual-core, 1.3GHz/1.8GHz Atom x5-E3930, which has a low 6.5W TDP.

PinePower 120W desktop power supply features display, USB PD, QC

  • PinePower 120W desktop power supply features display, USB PD, QC 3.0 and wireless charging

    Pine64’s January update includes the launch of PinePhone with Mobian operating system, some limited details about the upcoming Quartz64 RK3566 SBC that will ship with 4 to 8GB RAM, and other news about all their products.

    There’s not enough details yet to write a post about Quartz64, but another product caught my eyes: PinePower. Yes, Pine64 is now offering power supply, and last month they presented PinePower 65W GaN power adapter that looks similar to MINIX NEO P1 power supply, albeit slightly larger. But I find the desktop version of the power supply even more interesting with an integrated display that shows voltage and current for each port, and also adds Qi wireless charging.

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