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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • Visualizing system performance with RHEL 8 using Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) and Grafana (Part 2)

    In this post, I’d like to show you how to use Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) with Grafana and Redis to store and graph performance data for all the machines in your environment. We’ll do this in a simple two machine setup, but the concepts are the same as you add more machines.

  • Calibre 5.0 for Linux

    For those who like to read, Calibre is a wonderful program for managing e-books. Calibre will not only allowed to maintain and organize your library of e-books but also perform format conversions.

    Calibre can also let you read your e-books on your system without needing an e-reader. Of course, you can always read an e-book on a smartphone.

  • Firecracker: start a VM in less than a second

    Initially when I read about Firecracker being released, I thought it was just a tool for cloud providers to use – I knew that AWS Fargate and https://fly.io used it, but I didn’t think that it was something that I could directly use myself.

    But it turns out that Firecracker is relatively straightforward to use (or at least as straightforward as anything else that’s for running VMs), the documentation and examples are pretty clear, you definitely don’t need to be a cloud provider to use it, and as advertised, it starts VMs really fast!

    So I wanted to write about using Firecracker from a more DIY “I just want to run some VMs” perspective.

    I’ll start out by talking about what I’m using it for, and then I’ll explain a few things I learned about it along the way.

  • 3 email mistakes and how to avoid them

    In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 17 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021.

    OK, so we've talked about some things we should do with our email - Stop treating it as an instant messenger, Prioritize things, trying to reach Inbox Zero, and filtering it effectively. But what things SHOULDN'T we do?

  • 6 Steps to Teach Yourself System Administration

    Looking for ways to get started in system administration? In this Skills article, we’ll provide an overview of resources that will help you on your way. If you’re unfamiliar with the basics of what a system administrator does, we recommend starting with this introduction.

    There is no traditional path for acquiring the technical skills needed as a system administrator, according to Enable Sysadmin. “Some sysadmins have an associate or college degree, and some don’t. Depending on when a sysadmin began their career, he or she might have a variety of technical certificates ... or none at all.” Here, we provide an array of options with which to plot your own course of study.

  • How to install KaOS 2021.01
  • How to Install Krita 4.4.2 via Another PPA in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10

    For those prefer installing apps via apt method, the digital painting software Krita 4.4.2 now is available to install via another well trusted PPA for Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 20.10, Linux Mint 20.

    Krita 4.4.2 was released a week ago as the latest version of the free open-source painting software, with new features: SVG mesh Gradients, mesh transform, new gradient fill layer type, new brushes, and improved HiDPI support.

  • How to set up static IP address on Debian Linux 10/11 - nixCraft

    I have Debian 10 Linux cloud server, and it is configured to get IP addresses via DHCP. How do I convert DHCP address to static IP address settings?

  • How To Enable Hardware Accelerated Video Decode In Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi And Opera Browsers On Debian, Ubuntu Or Linux Mint

    Google Chrome 88 (and newer) has made hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux, but it's not enabled by default. Google Chrome is not the only Chromium-based web browser to support hardware acceleration on Linux though. This article explains how to enable hardware-accelerated video decoding in Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi and Opera web browsers running on Debian, Ubuntu, Pop!_OS or Linux Mint (Xorg only).

    Using hardware-accelerated video decode in your web browser should result in using less CPU usage (and thus, less battery draining) when playing online videos.

    It's worth noting that Chromium web browser had patches that allowed making hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux for some time, and some Linux distributions packaged it using those patches. So Chromium users have had hardware acceleration on Linux for some time, depending on their Linux distribution or if they installed the patched Chromium in some other way. E.g. on Ubuntu / Linux Mint there's a PPA with VA-API patched Chromium builds. Thus, these instructions may also work for Chromium browser, depending on how it's built.

  • How to Manipulate Images in the Linux Terminal

    Ever tire of constantly opening up your favorite image editor for a simple crop, resize, or to change the file format? Maybe you have a need to easily perform these tasks in batch or within software?

    Here's how to use the Linux convert tool, which allows you to do all this with terminal via the command line, and much more.

More From Derrik Diener

  • Debian: install Deb file [Guide]

    If you’ve used Debian Linux for any amount of time, you’ll have heard of “Deb” files. What are they? Deb files are packages for Debian Linux that contain software. They’re similar to EXEs on Windows.

  • Linux: download file from URL in terminal [Guide]

    Want to download files to your Linux PC from the command-line but don’t know how to do it? We can help! Follow along as we go over ways you can use the Linux terminal to download files!

  • Linux: list all users [Guide]

    On Linux, there are many different tools for creating new users. Each Linux desktop environment has a user manager, and these user managers, while very handy, come up short. None of them support viewing hidden system users such as root, dbus, etc.

    If you’ve been trying to get a complete list of all users on your Linux PC but don’t know where to start, this guide is for you. Follow along as we show you how to list all users on your Linux system, including ones that don’t appear in your Desktop Environment’s user manager.

More from askmetutorials

  • [Older] Install Firefox 84 on Ubuntu / Linux Mint / CentOS & Fedora

    In this tutorial, I will show you how to install Firefox 84 on Ubuntu 20.04 / 18.04 LTS, LinuxMint 20, Fedora 32, and CentOS 7.X / 8.X.

    Firefox most commonly used browsers by everyone and one of the standard browsers too.

  • [Older] Install HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) 3.20.11 in Ubuntu / Debian

    In this tutorial, I will show you how to install the latest version of HPLIP 3.20.11 On Ubuntu 20.10 and Debian 10.6.

    HPLIP stands for HP Linux Imaging and Printing, which is developed by HP for using HP Laserjet and HP Inkjet Printers Printer in Linux Platforms.

    HPLIP supports more than 2000 Printer models including all business models, inkjet, laser and etc.., you can also check the list of supported devices here.

  • [Older] Install Blender 2.91 On Ubuntu / Linux Mint Via PPA

    Blender is a free and open-source application for 3D Computer graphics software products used mainly for creating animated films, visual effects, art,3D Printing Models, Video games, and many more.

    Blender contains the following features sculpting,3D Modeling, animation, camera tracking, Rendering, Video editing, compositing, and many more and it supports multiple operating systems (ie) Windows, Linux, and MacOSX.

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More in Tux Machines

4 new open source licenses

As the steward of the Open Source Defintion, the Open Source Initiative has been designating licenses as "open source" for over 20 years. These licenses are the foundation of the open source software ecosystem, ensuring that everyone can use, improve, and share software. When a license is approved, it is because the OSI believes that the license fosters collaboration and sharing for the benefit of everyone who participates in the ecosystem. The world has changed over the past 20 years, with software now used in new and even unimaginable ways. The OSI has seen that the familiar open source licenses are not always well-suited for these new situations. But license stewards have stepped up, submitting several new licenses for more expansive uses. The OSI was challenged to evaluate whether these new concepts in licensing would continue to advance sharing and collaboration and merit being referred to as "open source" licenses, ultimately approving some new special purpose licenses. Read more

Stunning GNOME 40 Beta is Ready. Download and Test Now!

The GNOME team announced the availability of the official GNOME 40 Beta images in an email announcement. You can download and try the images now to experience the design overhaul. Read more

Can Linux Run Video Games?

Linux is a widely used and popular open source operating system that was first released back in 1991. It differs from operating systems like Windows and macOS in that it is open source and it is highly customizable through its use of “distributions”. Distributions or “distros” are basically different versions of Linux that can be installed along with the Linux core software so that users can customize their system to fit their specific need. Some of the more popular Linux distributions are Ubuntu, Debian and Fedora. For many years Linux had the reputation of being a terrible gaming platform and it was believed that users wouldn’t be able to engage in this popular form of entertainment. The main reason for this is that commercially successful games just weren’t being developed for Linux. A few well known video game titles like Doom, Quake and SimCity made it to Linux but for the most part they were overlooked through the 1990’s. However, things have changed a lot since then and there is an every expanding library of popular video games you can play on Linux. [...] There are plenty of Windows games you can run on Linux and no reason why you can’t play as well as you do when using Windows. If you are having trouble leveling up or winning the best loot, consider trying AskBoosters for help with your game. Aside from native Linux games and Windows games there are a huge amount of browser based games that work on any system including Linux. Read more

Security: DFI and Canonical, IBM/Red Hat/CentOS and Oracle, Malware in GitHub

  • DFI and Canonical offer risk-free system updates and reduced software lead times for the IoT ecosystem

    DFI and Canonical signed the Ubuntu IoT Hardware Certification Partner Program. DFI is the world’s first industrial computer manufacturer to join the program aimed at offering Ubuntu-certified IoT hardware ready for the over-the-air software update. The online update mechanism of and the authorized DFI online application store combines with DFI’s products’ application flexibility, to reduce software and hardware development time to deploy new services. DFI’s RemoGuard IoT solution will provide real-time monitoring and partition-level system recovery through out-of-band management technology. In addition to the Ubuntu online software update, RemoGuard avoids service interruption, reduces maintenance personnel costs, and response time to establish a seamless IoT ecosystem. From the booming 5G mobile network to industrial robot applications, a large number of small base stations, edge computing servers, and robots will be deployed in outdoor or harsh industrial environments. Ubuntu Core on DFI certified hardware and Remoguard brings the reassurance that no software update will bring risks and challenges of on-site repair.

  • Update CentOS Linux for free

    As you may know, in December 2020 IBM/Red Hat announced that CentOS Linux 8 will end in December 2021. Additionally, the updates for CentOS Linux 6 ended on November 30, 2020. If your organization relies on CentOS, you are faced with finding an alternative OS. The lack of regular updates puts these systems at increasing risk for major vulnerabilities with every passing day. A popular solution with minimal disruption is to simply point your CentOS systems to receive updates from Oracle Linux. This can be done anonymously and at no charge to your organization. With Oracle Linux, you can continue to benefit from a similar, stable CentOS alternative. Oracle Linux updates and errata are freely available and can be applied to CentOS or Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) instances without reinstalling the operating system. Just connect to the Oracle Linux yum server, and follow these instructions. Best of all, your apps continue to run as usual.

  • Malware in open-source web extensions

    Since the original creator has exclusive control over the account for the distribution channel (which is typically the user's only gateway to the program), it logically follows that they are responsible for transferring control to future maintainers, despite the fact that they may only have the copyright on a portion of the software. Additionally, as the distribution-channel account is the property of the project owner, they can sell that account and the accompanying maintainership. After all, while the code of the extension might be owned by its larger community, the distributing account certainly isn't. Such is what occurred for The Great Suspender, which was a Chrome extension on the Web Store that suspends inactive tabs, halting their scripts and releasing most of the resources from memory. In June 2020, Dean Oemcke, the creator and longtime maintainer, decided to move on from the project. He transferred the GitHub repository and the Web Store rights, announcing the change in a GitHub issue that said nothing about the identity of the new maintainer. The announcement even made a concerning mention of a purchase, which raises the question of who would pay money for a free extension, and why. Of course, as the vast majority of the users of The Great Suspender were not interested in its open-source nature, few of them noticed until October, when the new maintainer made a perfectly ordinary release on the Chrome Web Store. Well, perfectly ordinary except for the minor details that the release did not match the contents of the Git repository, was not tagged on GitHub, and lacked a changelog.