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Firefox 87 Enters Beta with the Backspace Key Disabled as a “Back” Button

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Moz/FF

While it doesn’t appear to include any major or important changes, Firefox 87 will apparently be the first update to the popular web browser used by default on numerous GNU/Linux distributions to disable the Backspace key from working as a “Back” button when you want to navigate back to the previous page.

This change was supposed to land in the Firefox 86 release that arrived earlier today, but, for some reason unknown to me, it didn’t happen, and it looks like Mozilla delayed it for Firefox 87. Mozilla recommends that you use the Alt + Left arrow keyboard shortcut instead.

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From Mozilla Itself

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Introducing State Partitioning

    State Partitioning is the technical term for a new privacy feature in Firefox called Total Cookie Protection, which will be available in ETP Strict Mode in Firefox 86. This article shows how State Partitioning works inside of Firefox and explains what developers of third-party integrations can do to stay compatible with the latest changes.

    Web sites utilize a variety of different APIs to store data in the browser. Most famous are cookies, which are commonly used to build login sessions and provide a customized user experience. We call these stateful APIs, because they are able to establish state that will persist through reloads, navigations and browser restarts. While these APIs allow developers to enrich a user’s web experience, they also enable nefarious web tracking which jeopardizes user privacy. To fight abuse of these APIs Mozilla is introducing State Partitioning in Firefox 86.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: A Fabulous February Firefox — 86!

    The Firefox web console used to include a cd() helper command that enabled developers to change the DevTools’ context to inspect a specific <iframe> present on the page. This helper has been removed in favor of the iframe context picker, which is much easier to use.

  • The Mozilla Blog: Latest Firefox release includes Multiple Picture-in-Picture and Total Cookie Protection

    Beginning last year, the internet began playing a bigger role in our lives than ever before. In the US, we went from only three percent of workers to more than forty percent working from home in 2020, all powered by the web. We also relied on it to stay informed, and connect with friends and family when we couldn’t meet in-person.

    And despite the many difficulties we all have faced online and offline, we’re proud to keep making Firefox an essential part of what makes the web work.

    Today I’m sharing two new features: multiple picture-in-picture (multi-PiP) and our latest privacy protection combo. Multi-PiP allows multiple videos to play at the same time — all the adorable animal videos or March Madness anyone? And our latest privacy protection, the dynamic duo of Total Cookie Protection (technically known as State Partitioning or Dynamic First-Party Isolation) and Supercookie Protections (launched in last month’s release) are here to combat cross-site cookie tracking once and for all.

  • Mozilla Security Blog: Firefox 86 Introduces Total Cookie Protection

    Today we are pleased to announce Total Cookie Protection, a major privacy advance in Firefox built into ETP Strict Mode. Total Cookie Protection confines cookies to the site where they were created, which prevents tracking companies from using these cookies to track your browsing from site to site.

    Cookies, those well-known morsels of data that web browsers store on a website’s behalf, are a useful technology, but also a serious privacy vulnerability. That’s because the prevailing behavior of web browsers allows cookies to be shared between websites, thereby enabling those who would spy on you to “tag” your browser and track you as you browse. This type of cookie-based tracking has long been the most prevalent method for gathering intelligence on users. It’s a key component of the mass commercial tracking that allows advertising companies to quietly build a detailed personal profile of you.

    In 2019, Firefox introduced Enhanced Tracking Protection by default, blocking cookies from companies that have been identified as trackers by our partners at Disconnect. But we wanted to take protections to the next level and create even more comprehensive protections against cookie-based tracking to ensure that no cookies can be used to track you from site to site as you browse the web.

  • About:Community: New Contributors In Firefox 86

    With the release of Firefox 86, we are pleased to welcome many new friends of the Fox, developers who’ve contributed their first code changes to Firefox in version 86. 25 were brand new volunteers! Please join us in congratulating, thanking and welcoming all of these diligent and enthusiastic contributors, and take a look at their excellent work...

Firefox 86.0 released in GNU/Linux news sites

  • Firefox 86.0 released

    The Firefox 86.0 release is out. New features this time include picture-in-picture video and "total cookie protection", which appears to be a way to allow third-party cookies while preserving some privacy.

  • Firefox 86.0 Released With Total Cookie Protection, Stack Clash Protection - Phoronix

    Firefox 86.0 is out today as the latest monthly update to this open-source web browser that continues to work on ramping up its security offerings.

    Firefox 86.0 introduces "Total Cookie Protection" in strict mode where every website is then bound to its own "cookie jar" to better prevent sites from tracking users site-to-site. Firefox on Linux and Android also now mitigates against stack clash attacks. DTLS 1.0 support has also been dropped from WebRTC PeerConnections support.

  • Firefox 86 Released with Multiple Picture-in-Picture Support, More - OMG! Ubuntu!

    It does feel like the gaps between each new Firefox release gets shorter every month — that, or I’m just getting older!

    Anyway, Firefox 86 is the latest stable release. It’s proper released too, not just up on the Firefox FTP. The change-log isn’t nearly as full as the one for last month’s Firefox 85 release but there are a few goodies worth knowing about.

    Top of the pile? The ability to watch multiple videos in picture-in-picture mode (PIP) at the same time. Perfect for gawking at the latest escapades of egregiously witty influencers, YouTubers, and TV show binges. Each pip (when focused) also supports keyboard arrow navigation to skip back/forward in 10 second increments.

  • Firefox 86 Is Released With Drastically Improved WebGL Performance

    "Total Cookie Protection" if "Strict Mode" is enabled, AVIF image support, multiple videos in picture-in-picture mode, 12 security fixes and vastly improved WebGL performance on Linux machines with a dedicated GPU are among the highlights in Mozilla Firefox 86.

Firefox 86 Is An Exciting Release With Total Cookie Protection

  • Firefox 86 Is An Exciting Release With Total Cookie Protection and Multiple Picture-in-Picture Mode

    Firefox as an open-source Chrome alternative is already a quite popular choice among Linux users. With every recent update to Mozilla Firefox, it looks like Firefox is proving to be a compelling choice over Chromium-based browsers overall.

    The announcement for Firefox 86.0 is yet something interesting.

    With Firefox 86 update, there are two key additions along with some other improvements. Let’s talk about it here.

Firefox 86 Released with Multiple Video Playback...

  • Firefox 86 Released with Multiple Video Playback in Picture-in-Picture Mode

    Mozilla Firefox web browser 86.0 was released with improved pop out video support and latest privacy protection.

    In Firefox 86, you can now play multiple videos at the same time in the Picture-in-Picture mode.

    The new release also features new privacy protection: Total Cookie Protection. It stops cookies from tracking you around the web by creating a separate cookie jar for every website.

    To enable this feature, go to about:preferences#privacy page and set Enhanced Tracking Protection to Strict mode.

The Talospace Project: Firefox 86 on POWER

  • The Talospace Project: Firefox 86 on POWER

    Firefox 86 is out, not only with multiple picture-in-picture (now have all the Weird Al videos open simultaneously!) and total cookie protection (not to be confused with other things called TCP) but also some noticeable performance improvements and finally gets rid of Backspace backing you up, a key I have never pressed to go back a page. Or, maybe those performance improvements are due to further improvements to our LTO-PGO recipe, which uses Fedora's work to get rid of the sidecar shell script. Now with this single patch, plus their change to nsTerminator.cpp to allow optimization to be unbounded by time, you can build a fully link- and profile-guided optimized version for OpenPOWER and gcc with much less work. Firefox 86 also incorporates our low-level Power-specific fix to xpconnect.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • ClamAV 0.103.2 Is Released With Security Fixes For Four Vulnerabilities

    The free software anti-virus scanner ClamAV has, ironically, made a security release fixing four vulnerabilities. Two of them could cause it to crash, one could cause it to enter a endless loop and a Windows-specific vulnerability could lead to privilege escalation. ClamAV has 8,532,858 virus signatures it can scan for in its database.

  • Why the U.S. Shouldn’t Play Games With Cyberwarfare as Its Power Declines

    In the SolarWinds hack, a backdoor in one of the components was downloaded to the systems of 18,000 organizations, including the U.S. Treasury and Commerce departments, the Department of Homeland Security and the State Department.

    In the Microsoft Exchange Server hack, an estimated 250,000 machinesworldwide might have been affected by a vulnerability that allowed hackers to control the machines and even infect other systems in the internal network of the targeted companies. Four major vulnerabilities in Microsoft Exchange Server were reported to Microsoft in early January. Unfortunately, it wasn’t until early March that Microsoft released patches, according to ZDNet. These vulnerabilities were used by the hackers during the period that Microsoft had either not released the patches, or companies had not upgraded their systems and installed the patches.

  •  
  • LinkedIn denies data leak after two-thirds user base is compromised
                     
                       

    Personal data of 500 million LinkedIn users, two thirds of its user base, has been scraped and is for sale online, according to a report from Cyber News.

                       

    The data up for sale on a popular hacker platform includes account IDs, full names, email addresses, workplace information and links to social media accounts of users hosted on the platform.

  •                    
  • Linkedin data leak: Major breach exposes 500 million users on Microsoft platform [details]
                         
                           

    While people are yet to digest the huge Facebook data leak of 533 million users (including 6.1 million Indians), Microsoft-owned professional networking platform LinkedIn is now facing a massive data leak of 500 million users that is allegedly being sold online.

                           

    An archive with data purportedly scraped from 500 million LinkedIn profiles has been put for sale on a popular [cracker] forum, with another 2 million records leaked as a proof-of-concept sample by people behind the [crack].

Elephant and Its Ivory

Elephant and Its Ivory

LIVES at risk. This is a travesty. REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA'S MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND TOURISM: "We should manage elephants based on science and not emotions." By auctioning/selling off 170 live elephants? Give us a break. Oftentimes, animals were to make a sacrifice over humans because they are just "animals", so they can't speak to us, and can't protest. We're asked to assume they're just the least important, therefore we can eradicate (or "cull") them -- as simple as that. How I wish the the Animal Kingdom will become a force and burn this kind of society just to make a statement -- and then, maybe, humans will truly realise the value of animal rights. Shame on those African countries which don't give a shit about all those people who tirelessly devoted their time and life to protecting the wild animals, and specifically the elephants. Animals can't speak, but they can see you and they can feel you; just look into and gaze at their eyes, doesn't that give you a goosebumps? Burn.

today's howtos

  • Virtualization Performance on an Intel NUC 11 Enthusiast Phantom Canyon NUC11PHKi7C

    I've previously looked at Windows and Linux performance on the NUC11PHKi7C Enthusiast Phantom Canyon which is Intel’s latest NUC 11 flagship product specifically targeting gamers as it includes an NVIDIA RTX 2060 GPU. One usage aspect I didn't test was virtualization and this brief article looks at the performance running VirtualBox and WSL2 on the NUC11PHKi7C and comparing it to Intel’s previous NUC with a discrete GPU: the NUC 9 Extreme Ghost Canyon.

  • How To Install and Configure Apache SVN Server On Linux Desktop

    The Apache server is widely used for running servers and sites over the internet. If you own a distributed server where many administrators work together on the same project, you probably face problems keeping a record of who made the server changes. Here comes the Apache SVN server that you can install on your Linux machine to keep the log of your server’s activity and changes. It can maintain the login data, documentation data, source code, and other revisions. The Apache subversion system allows users and contributors to make changes, add features, revise and modify the repository with keeping the change records. You can also backup, revert, override, update your repository and delete revisions through the Apache SVN tool.

  • How to Create a Self-Signed SSL Certificate

    SSL certificates are used to facilitate authentication and encryption on the internet. Normally, these certificates are issued by trusted third-party certificate authorities such as Let’s Encrypt. A self-signed certificate is one that is obtained without going through any third-party certificate authority. TLS/SSL is a combination of a public certificate and a private key. The private key is stored securely on the server or on the load balancer, whereas the certificate is publicly accessible. In this tutorial, we explain how to create a self-signed SSL certificate by using the OpenSSL tool.

  • How to install and configure pCloud on Fedora | FOSS Linux

    You might have heard and used cloud services like DropBox, OneDrive, Google Drive, iCloud, and many others. These have already integrated into various applications as an additional cloud storage option. However, one more cloud service seems to be taking the market by a storm due to its amazing features and plans. That’s the pCloud Service. pCloud is a cloud storage service from Switzerland and first launched in 2013. It is a cross-platform application with a desktop client available for Windows, Linux, macOS, IOS, and Android. When you first sign-up on pCloud, you are given 10GB of storage completely free. One of their amazing and competitive features is the security implemented on their systems. They even went ahead to hold a pCloud Crypto challenge that brought hackers worldwide to try and break their client-side encryption, but none of them succeeded. To ensure reliability in the availability of data, pCloud uses a distributed system architecture. All users’ data are distributed across five (5) servers stored in different locations. Therefore, when one server goes down, you are still assured of data availability. To ensure data security in transit (data being transmitted from your device to pCloud servers and vice versa), pCloud uses SSL/TLS protocols (Secure Socket Layer and Transport layer security. Like most cloud services available, pCloud comes with both free and paid plans. As you would expect, the latter comes with a lot more amazing features, including a lifetime plan.

GNOME 41 Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 22nd, 2021

While some of you out there are still waiting for the GNOME 40 desktop environment to arrive in the stable software repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution, the GNOME Project is already working on the next major version, GNOME 41. Development on the GNOME 41 release will kick out soon and it will stick to the same routine as in the GNOME 40 development cycle, meaning that public testers will be able to test drive only an Alpha, a Beta, and a Release Candidate. Read more