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Extending no-cost Red Hat Enterprise Linux to open source organizations

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Linux
Red Hat
OSS

Today, we’re announcing a new, no-cost program tailored for the needs and requirements of projects, foundations and more: Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for Open Source Infrastructure. Joining a growing set of no-cost and low-cost programs, RHEL for Open Source Infrastructure provides a simpler, clearer and documented process for projects, communities, standards bodies and other not-for-profit software groups engaged with open source to gain access to RHEL subscriptions. While we plan to continue to refine this latest program, we wanted to outline what is available now for interested parties.

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Also: Red Hat Announces Free "RHEL For Open-Source Infrastructure"

Red Hat introduces free RHEL for open-source, non-profit orga

  • Red Hat introduces free RHEL for open-source, non-profit organizations

    When Red Hat, CentOS's Linux parent company, announced it was "shifting focus from CentOS Linux, the rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), to CentOS Stream," CentOS users were not happy. Now, in an effort to mollify them and to keep its promise to open-source organizations, Red Hat is introducing a new, free RHEL for Open Source Infrastructure.

In Slashdot now

Red Hat returns with another peace offering

  • Red Hat returns with another peace offering in the wake of the CentOS Stream affair: More free stuff

    Red Hat today further extended its olive branch to open-source groups with another freebie of sorts: this time, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for Open Source Infrastructure.

    The IBM-owned Linux distro giant will offer selected bodies free "RHEL subscriptions for any use within the confines of their infrastructure." By infrastructure, they mean things like build and continuous integration systems, and web and mail servers.

    While definitely not aimed at individual developers – we'll get to that later – the program is "available exclusively to open source projects and other organizations that support the production of open source software." And what do those teams get?

Red Hat Launches RHEL For Open Source Infrastructure

  • Red Hat Launches RHEL For Open Source Infrastructure

    Red Hat recently announced a new, no-cost program tailored for the requirements of projects, foundations and more: Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for Open Source Infrastructure.

    According to the company, the program provides a clearer and documented process for projects, communities, standards bodies and other not-for-profit software groups engaged with open source to gain access to RHEL subscriptions.

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