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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • Using the udp-balancer() source of syslog-ng PE

    UDP-based log collection is so last century. We had TCP-based log collection for decades and TLS encryption to secure connections. Still, UDP is in wide use, especially at large companies and industrial automation, where every change is slow. In most cases, UDP logging is used by networking devices, but sometimes it is just left there from ancient times and people are reluctant to change it. In either case, at higher message rates it can lead to performance problems and thus to message loss.

    Originally, the udp() source of syslog-ng was single-threaded. That does not scale well with typical multi-core CPUs with slower cores. There are many tricks to enhance UDP performance in syslog-ng. Combining those with the udp-balancer() source of syslog-ng PE gives the most reliable solution.

  • What is Docker? The spark for the container revolution

    Docker is a software platform for building applications based on containers—small and lightweight execution environments that make shared use of the operating system kernel but otherwise run in isolation from one another. While containers have been used in Linux and Unix systems for some time, Docker, an open source project launched in 2013, helped popularize the technology by making it easier than ever for developers to package their software to “build once and run anywhere.”

  • The Evolution of Digital Data Loggers

    Digital data loggers have come a long way over the years. Data loggers are small digital devices that are used to record, store, and sometimes transmit large amounts of data that is gathered through sensors. Like many other kinds of technology, the design and construction of digital data loggers has been altered and improved over the years.

    [...]

    It should come as no surprise that this simple piece of technology has come such a long way in the last 100-plus years. When the first chart recorder for environmental monitoring was patented, the first transcontinental phone call was also placed. Now, we have high-tech computers in our pockets that we call phones; data loggers have made the same technological leaps.

    The move from chart recorders to data loggers was a massive step forward, but those early devices are a far cry from what today’s digital data loggers are capable of doing. Above are listed just a handful of the benefits the latest data loggers provide. Depending on your organization, data loggers may well have even more specific advantages.

    The main point is, if your organization is not using the latest version of this great technology, it is missing out. There is no excuse in 2021 for not at least considering what a modern digital data logger can do for you and how it can affect your manufacturing, storage and transportation processes, your compliance with regulations and standards and, ultimately, your bottom line.

  • Deescalating Tensions

    One of the great attributes of SVG is that its text nature lends itself to be easily version controlled. Inkscape uses SVG as its native format (and extends it using its private namespace).

    Unfortunately it uses the documents themselves to store things like canvas position and zoom state. This instantly erases one of the benefits for easy version control as every change instantly turns into unsolvable conflict.

    Luckily you can at least give up the ability to store the canvas position for the greater good of not having merge conflicts, if you manage to convince your peers to change its defaults. Which is what this blog post is about Smile

  • Move files in the Linux terminal

    To move a file on a computer with a graphical interface, you open the folder where the file is currently located, and then open another window to the folder you want to move the file into. Finally, you drag and drop the file from one to the other.

    To move a file in a terminal, you use the mv command to move a file from one location to another.

  • Install OpenVPN on your Linux PC | Opensource.com

    OpenVPN creates an encrypted tunnel between two points, preventing a third party from accessing your network traffic. By setting up your virtual private network (VPN) server, you become your own VPN provider. Many popular VPN services already use OpenVPN, so why tie your connection to a specific provider when you can have complete control?

    The first article in this series demonstrated how to set up and configure a Linux PC to serve as your OpenVPN server. It also discussed how to configure your router so that you can reach your VPN server from an outside network.

    This second article demonstrates how to install the OpenVPN server software using steps customized from the OpenVPN wiki.

More in Tux Machines

Fairphone 4 5G Revealing Snapdragon 750G SoC Spotted on Geekbench, Launch Expected Soon

We are aware of the fact that Fairphone is prepping up for the launch of the Fairphone 3 successor – the Fairphone 4 5G (FP4). The device’s key specifications and renders were revealed last week, courtesy of a retailer listing. As per the preliminary retailer listing, the Fairphone 4 5G is expected to pack 6GB of RAM and 128GB/256GB storage. The hardware specs of the device remained a mystery up till now. However, these details now are out courtesy of the Geekbench listing. MySmartPrice is the first to spot the Fairphone 4 Geekbench listing. The test results reveal that the device will pack Snapdragon 750G SoC and 6GB of RAM. Read more

Günther Wagner: GNOME Builder 41 Highlights

Builder now maintains a private Flatpak installation to install SDKs and SDK extensions that are not available in the user’s Flatpak installation. This means Builder will no longer add flathub or gnome-nightly to your user’s Flatpak installation. Builder now uses an out-of-process Flatpak helper (gnome-builder-flatpak) to vastly improve its ability to track and resolve SDK extensions. This will improve the situation for applications requiring Rust, LLVM, and others going forward. You can update your SDKs and dependencies together using the “Update Dependencies” button in the build popover. More information can be found in Christian’s blog post. Read more

Games: Steam Deck, FUTEX2, and Anti-Cheat Support

  • Steam Deck, Linux and Mac Get Easy Anti-Cheat Support

    Epic Games has just released an update to its Easy Anti-Cheat software that will add support for the Steam Deck, as well as Linux and macOS operating systems. According to an Epic blog post today, the new update is now available to developers for free and is designed to work with Wine and Steam's Proton compatibility layer to ensure all platforms under Linux get full anti-cheat support. This is great news for Linux Gamers and for the new Steam Deck, since the anti-cheat services were previously locked to Windows operating systems. Even though the games could be fully functional in a compatibility environment such as Proton or Wine. Now, more platforms have the capability to run all multiplayer games with Epic's popular anti-cheat software, as long as developers enable Linux and Mac support. This is especially important for Valve's Steam Deck, which counts on its SteamOS being able to run the entire Steam library. Obviously, lacking anti-cheat support could have been a major problem for the new console.

  • Valve's Steam Deck supports dual boot and booting from a microSD card - Liliputing

    The Valve Steam Deck is expected to begin shipping in December to customers who pre-orders the handheld gaming computer for $399 or more. But ever since introducing the Linux-powered PC with a custom AMD processor this summer, Valve has been getting a lot of questions.

  • Updated "FUTEX2" futex_waitv Patches Posted To Address Latest Feedback - Phoronix

    The promising FUTEX2 work focused on improving the Linux performance for running Windows games via Wine/Proton by extending futex to wait on multiple locks is still moving forward. Last month the work was revised in simpler form by just focusing on the new "futex_waitv" system call and postpone additional improvements planned around variable-sized futexes, NUMA-awareness, and more. That additional work will come later while the immediate focus is on the "futex_waitv" system call to address the needs of Wine/Proton by better matching Windows' WaitForMultipleObjects behavior with more efficient emulation.

Epic Boost to GNU//Linux Gamers

  • Epic Online Services launches Anti-Cheat support for Linux, Mac, and Steam Deck - Epic Online Services

    Easy Anti-Cheat now supports all major PC operating systems, including Linux, Mac, and Steam Deck.

  • Epic Games Announces Easy Anti-Cheat For Linux - Including Wine/Proton - Phoronix

    Not too surprising given the Steam Deck is inching closer towards release and we've known Valve has been working to improve the anti-cheat situation for games on Linux, but today EAC owner Epic Games officially announced Easy Anti-Cheat for both Linux and macOS. Easy Anti-Cheat is one of the popular anti-cheating solutions used by a number of Windows games. Epic Games is now making EAC available for Linux and macOS. Plus they are also making it supported under Wine/Proton too.

  • Epic Games announce full Easy Anti-Cheat support for Linux including Wine & Proton | GamingOnLinux

    Today, Easy Anti-Cheat from Epic Games / Epic Online Services has officially announced a full expansion for Linux including native builds and Wine + Proton. This is big for Linux Gaming and the Steam Deck. For those who don't know, Epic Games owns Easy Anti-Cheat and earlier this year they made it free for all developers making Windows games. Today this has been expanded to fully support developers doing native Linux games (and macOS too). Not only that, this is the big one we've been waiting for — they've also expanded Easy Anti-Cheat support officially for the Wine and Steam Play Proton compatibility layers.

  • Epic Games makes Easy Anti Cheat available for Linux, paving the way for Steam Deck | Windows Central

    One of the big flies in the Steam Deck ointment has always been how anti-cheat software will be handled. The truth is that a lot of the popular Windows games that can't be played on Linux through Steam's Proton Compatibility layer, or through WINE, are because of anti-cheat software. The first big step forward has just happened, though, right as game developers are starting to receive their Steam Deck dev kits. Epic Games, owner of Easy Anti Cheat, has announced that the software is now compatible with Linux, including WINE and Proton, as well as macOS. And all for the low price of free.