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Mozilla's Latest Privacy Posing

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Moz/FF
  • Advancing advertising transparency in the US Congress [Ed: Mozilla needs to block ads/advertisers, not suck up to them, but Mozilla is funded by Google and Google profits a lot from targeted (spying-based) advertising, so we get blog posts like these; do what users of Firefox want, not sponsors]

    At Mozilla we believe that greater transparency into the online advertising ecosystem can empower individuals, safeguard advertisers’ interests, and address systemic harms. Lawmakers around the world are stepping up to help realize that vision, and in this post we’re weighing in with some preliminary reflections on a newly-proposed ad transparency bill in the United States Congress: the Social Media DATA Act.

  • Privacy analysis of SWAN.community and United ID 2.0 [Ed: Mozilla is again posing as privacy proponent]

    Earlier this summer, we started a series of blog posts analyzing the technical merits of the various privacy-preserving advertising proposals out there. Our goal is to advance the debate and help break down this complex topic. In this new addition to this series, we look at the SWAN.community and United ID 2.0 proposals. We have conducted a detailed analysis and this post provides a summary.

  • Why Facebook’s claims about the Ad Observer are wrong [Ed: Mozilla hires managers from Facebook]

    Recently the Surgeon General of the United States weighed in on the spread of disinformation on major platforms and its effects on people and society. He echoed the calls of researchers, activists and organizations, like Mozilla, for the major platforms to release more data, and to provide access to researchers in order to analyze the spread and impact of misinformation.

    Yet Facebook has again taken steps to shut down this exact kind of research on its platform, a troubling pattern we have witnessed from Facebook including sidelining their own Crowdtangle and killing a suite of tools from Propublica and Mozilla in 2019.

    Most recently, Facebook has terminated the accounts of New York University researchers that built Ad Observer, an extension dedicated to bringing greater transparency to political advertising that was critical for researchers and journalists during the presidential election.

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Günther Wagner: GNOME Builder 41 Highlights

Builder now maintains a private Flatpak installation to install SDKs and SDK extensions that are not available in the user’s Flatpak installation. This means Builder will no longer add flathub or gnome-nightly to your user’s Flatpak installation. Builder now uses an out-of-process Flatpak helper (gnome-builder-flatpak) to vastly improve its ability to track and resolve SDK extensions. This will improve the situation for applications requiring Rust, LLVM, and others going forward. You can update your SDKs and dependencies together using the “Update Dependencies” button in the build popover. More information can be found in Christian’s blog post. Read more

Games: Steam Deck, FUTEX2, and Anti-Cheat Support

  • Steam Deck, Linux and Mac Get Easy Anti-Cheat Support

    Epic Games has just released an update to its Easy Anti-Cheat software that will add support for the Steam Deck, as well as Linux and macOS operating systems. According to an Epic blog post today, the new update is now available to developers for free and is designed to work with Wine and Steam's Proton compatibility layer to ensure all platforms under Linux get full anti-cheat support. This is great news for Linux Gamers and for the new Steam Deck, since the anti-cheat services were previously locked to Windows operating systems. Even though the games could be fully functional in a compatibility environment such as Proton or Wine. Now, more platforms have the capability to run all multiplayer games with Epic's popular anti-cheat software, as long as developers enable Linux and Mac support. This is especially important for Valve's Steam Deck, which counts on its SteamOS being able to run the entire Steam library. Obviously, lacking anti-cheat support could have been a major problem for the new console.

  • Valve's Steam Deck supports dual boot and booting from a microSD card - Liliputing

    The Valve Steam Deck is expected to begin shipping in December to customers who pre-orders the handheld gaming computer for $399 or more. But ever since introducing the Linux-powered PC with a custom AMD processor this summer, Valve has been getting a lot of questions.

  • Updated "FUTEX2" futex_waitv Patches Posted To Address Latest Feedback - Phoronix

    The promising FUTEX2 work focused on improving the Linux performance for running Windows games via Wine/Proton by extending futex to wait on multiple locks is still moving forward. Last month the work was revised in simpler form by just focusing on the new "futex_waitv" system call and postpone additional improvements planned around variable-sized futexes, NUMA-awareness, and more. That additional work will come later while the immediate focus is on the "futex_waitv" system call to address the needs of Wine/Proton by better matching Windows' WaitForMultipleObjects behavior with more efficient emulation.

Epic Boost to GNU//Linux Gamers

  • Epic Online Services launches Anti-Cheat support for Linux, Mac, and Steam Deck - Epic Online Services

    Easy Anti-Cheat now supports all major PC operating systems, including Linux, Mac, and Steam Deck.

  • Epic Games Announces Easy Anti-Cheat For Linux - Including Wine/Proton - Phoronix

    Not too surprising given the Steam Deck is inching closer towards release and we've known Valve has been working to improve the anti-cheat situation for games on Linux, but today EAC owner Epic Games officially announced Easy Anti-Cheat for both Linux and macOS. Easy Anti-Cheat is one of the popular anti-cheating solutions used by a number of Windows games. Epic Games is now making EAC available for Linux and macOS. Plus they are also making it supported under Wine/Proton too.

  • Epic Games announce full Easy Anti-Cheat support for Linux including Wine & Proton | GamingOnLinux

    Today, Easy Anti-Cheat from Epic Games / Epic Online Services has officially announced a full expansion for Linux including native builds and Wine + Proton. This is big for Linux Gaming and the Steam Deck. For those who don't know, Epic Games owns Easy Anti-Cheat and earlier this year they made it free for all developers making Windows games. Today this has been expanded to fully support developers doing native Linux games (and macOS too). Not only that, this is the big one we've been waiting for — they've also expanded Easy Anti-Cheat support officially for the Wine and Steam Play Proton compatibility layers.

  • Epic Games makes Easy Anti Cheat available for Linux, paving the way for Steam Deck | Windows Central

    One of the big flies in the Steam Deck ointment has always been how anti-cheat software will be handled. The truth is that a lot of the popular Windows games that can't be played on Linux through Steam's Proton Compatibility layer, or through WINE, are because of anti-cheat software. The first big step forward has just happened, though, right as game developers are starting to receive their Steam Deck dev kits. Epic Games, owner of Easy Anti Cheat, has announced that the software is now compatible with Linux, including WINE and Proton, as well as macOS. And all for the low price of free.

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