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Kernel: Linux Work by Intel. Oracle, and AMD

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Linux
  • Intel Proposes Linux Kernel Driver Allow/Deny Filtering

    As part of their work around Trust Domain Extensions (TDX) support for Linux, Intel engineers are proposing a driver filter option for Linux to be able to set allow or deny lists of driver(s) that can or cannot be loaded by the booted kernel.

    In order to reduce the attack surface within guest virtual machines while still wanting to be able to use the same kernel build between a host and guest, Intel engineers are looking to add this driver filter support to the kernel. When booting the guest, via the kernel command-line they can just specify the specific drivers to allow to be loaded by the kernel or alternatively setting a list of specific drivers that shouldn't be allowed to be loaded by the system.

  • Oracle Working On BPF CO-RE Support For GCC To Easily Run BPF Programs On Any Kernel

    Running eBPF kernel programs continues to be increasing popular and used for a variety of use-cases in production environments but one of the challenges is around needing to compile the (e)BPF programs for a given kernel while BPF CO-RE has been working to change that. The LLVM Clang compiler already supports the ability for BPF "Compile Once, Run Everywhere" while now Oracle engineers are working to bring the same level of support to GCC.

  • AMD PTDMA Driver Revised Ahead Of Its Possible Inclusion For Linux 5.15 - Phoronix

    One of the AMD patch series that has been in the works for more than one year is the PTDMA driver providing pass-through DMA engine support on Linux. The driver is now up to its eleventh revision but the mainlining might happen soon.

    The AMD PTDMA Linux driver effort dates back to September 2019 for enabling their PTDMA controller in performing high bandwidth memory-to-memory and I/O copy operations. Modern AMD CPUs support multiple PTDMA controllers, the PTDMA driver hooks into the kernel's direct memory access (DMA) subsystem and is intended to be used with AMD Non-Transparent Bridge (NTB) devices but not for general purpose peripheral DMA.

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Open Hardware/Modding: Olimex, Arduino, and More

  • iMX8MPlus-SOM is alive and boots!

    This board development started in April 2021 and finished August 2021 but the semiconductor shortages didn’t allow us to test the prototypes until recently. We assembled 4 boards and all theyare alive and boot.

  • Arduino Portenta gets an LTE Cat. M1/NB IoT GNSS shield - CNX Software

    Arduino PRO Portenta family of industrial boards is getting a new LTE Cat. M1/NB-IoT GNSS shield that adds global connectivity and positioning capabilities through the Cinterion TX62-W LPWAN IoT module by Thales.

  • Long Range Burglar Alarm Relies On LoRa Modules | Hackaday

    [Elite Worm] had a problem; there had been two minor burglaries from a storage unit. The unit had thick concrete walls, cellular signal was poor down there, and permanent wiring wasn’t possible. He thus set about working on a burglar alarm that would fit his unique requirements. An ESP32 is the heart of the operation, paired with a long-range LoRa radio module running at 868 MHz. This lower frequency has much better penetration when it comes to thick walls compared to higher-frequency technologies like 4G, 5G or WiFi. With a little coil antenna sticking out the top of the 3D-printed enclosure, the device was readily able to communicate back to [Elite Worm] when the storage unit was accessed illegitimately.

You Should Be In Control of Your Tech

On the hardware front having control means hardware you can open and inspect and is designed for repairability. That hardware should ideally run firmware (as much as possible) that is free software so you can also inspect and update it. If the hardware provides security features, they should be designed to put you in control, not the vendor, including control of any keys. The hardware should not require the vendor’s signatures (and therefore their permission) to boot an operating system, but instead should let you boot into whatever operating system you prefer. The operating system and the software it runs, should all be free software. Free software by its very nature puts you in full control. You have control because you can not only inspect the software to see what it does, you (or someone else in the community with software development knowledge) can change the software if it operates outside your interests. You may have noticed that you don’t tend to have a lot of adware or spyware in the free software world. That’s because it’s difficult to hide spyware inside of code that anyone can inspect. Another reason is that if free software behaves in a way that runs counter to the user’s wishes (such as capturing and selling their data, or popping up unwanted ads), the user (or someone else in the community) could simply create a legitimate fork of the project with those objectionable bits removed. Read more

What’s New in KDE Plasma 5.24: 5 Major Improvements to Expect

KDE is set to release Plasma 5.24, the first major release of 2022. The beta version is already out and gives a glimpse of what new features to expect in KDE Plasma 5.24. This new version brings forward various updates spread across the entire KDE ecosystem and improves things like Wayland support and system navigation. Read below to find out all the exciting new features you can expect in KDE Plasma 5.24, which will be released in February 2022. Read more

Anbernic RG552 review

From the RG350 to the RG280V and many more inbetween, it’s built a solid reputation for putting out superb, affordable Linux-based handhelds purpose built for retro gaming, with build quality far beyond expectations. Read more