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Games: Linux Gaming Guide, Splitgate, Intellectual Pinball

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Gaming
  • Linux Gaming Guide: How To Easily Install And Update Proton GE

    If you’re a PC gamer, or you’ve been tracking the news around Valve’s Steam Deck, you’ve probably heard about Proton, a "compatibility layer" built into Steam that makes Windows-only games playable on Linux. Valve and Codeweavers (the company behind WINE) are responsible for this wizardry that makes Linux gaming surprisingly awesome.

    Perhaps you've also heard rumblings about Proton-GE, or you've seen YouTube videos with references to "Glorious Eggroll." Glorious Eggroll is also known as Thomas Crider, a senior engineer at Red Hat. And he creates a custom version of Proton that is immensely useful.

  • Many players report that Splitgate is crashing for them on Linux

    Splitgate is one of the latest titles that gained massive popularity after its recent release on the Xbox and PlayStation. Built using Unreal Engine 4, it is a combination of Portal and Halo.

    The developers, 1047 Games, soon grew from a team of just 4 people and managed to raise $10 million in a recent funding round. While the developers welcomed the sudden influx of money, it also resulted in the game being pushed to an August release date.

  • Intellectual Pinball

    Hey there, Ernie here with a piece from Michael Bentley, who knows a ton about the intersection between trivia and technology. The two avenues crossed paths in a big way in the mid ’80s.

  • Bringing a Ruined Game Boy Cart Back To Life with Tons of Soldering

    The cartridge was badly corroded, with many of the traces eaten through, rendering the game inoperable. First, all the components were removed, and the board was cleaned. This allowed easy access to the traces across the whole board. Then, the job was to delicately remove some solder mask from the parts of the traces still remaining, and bridge the gaps with fine copper wire. Even worse, several vias were damaged, which [Taylor] tackled by feeding jumper wires through the board and executing a repair on each side.

    It’s a simple enough repair for the experienced hand, but virtually magic to a retro gaming fan that doesn’t know how to solder. [Taylor] has given us a great example of how to deal with corroded carts properly, with enough detail to be quite educational to the beginner.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • New Side-Channel Vulnerability in the Linux Kernel Enabling DNS Cache Poisoning

    A recent research paper by a team at University of California, Riverside, shows the existence of previously overlooked side channels in the Linux kernels that can be exploited to attack DNS servers. According to the researchers, the issue with DNS roots in its design, that never really took security as a key concern and that made it extremely hard to retrofit strong security features into it.

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 194 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 194. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Don't traceback when comparing nested directories with non-directories.
      (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope#288)
    
  • Thousands of printers at risk of denial of service attacks

    Researchers have highlighted a trio of potential attacks against printers that could allow denial of service, information theft, or botnet compromise. The collection of attacks, labeled Printjack, appeared in a paper from researchers Giampaolo Bella and Pietro Biondi at the Universit`a di Catania and Istituto di Informatica e Telematica in Italy.

  • GoDaddy says information on 1.2 million customers exposed in data breach

    In a document filed to the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday, GoDaddy noted that the company had discovered its Managed WordPress hosting environment had been compromised by an “unauthorized third party,” resulting in emails and customers numbers of 1.2 million Managed WordPress users being exposed.

Fedora 35 Mini-Review On The Blackbird And TALOS II

My conclusion is damning with faint praise: at least it wasn't any worse. And with these tweaks it works fine. If you're on F34 you have no reason not to upgrade, and if you're on F33 you won't have much longer until you have to (and you might as well just jump right to F35 at that point). But it's still carrying an odd number of regressions (even though, or perhaps despite the fact, the workarounds for F35 are the same as F34) and the installation on the T2 was bumpier than the Blackbird for reasons that remain unclear to me. If you run KDE or Xfce or anything other than GNOME, you shouldn't have any problems, but if you still use GNOME as your desktop environment you should be prepared to do more preparatory work to get it off the ground. I have higher hopes for F36 because we may finally get that float128 update that still wrecks a small but notable selection of packages like MAME, but I also hope that some of these regressions get dealt with as well because that would make these updates a bit more liveable. Any system upgrade of any OS will make you wonder what's going to break this time, but the most recent Fedora updates have come off as more fraught with peril than they ought to be. Read more

Cross-platform package building: Pkgsrc vs. Ravenports (1/2)

This is the first of a two articles on cross-platform package management / package building. It covers the basics by discussing why it is actually surprisingly (to many people) difficult to do and what some of the problems are. It also takes a quick look at some strategies to solve the problem.

Read more

Open Hardware Leftovers

  • How I Built a Homelab on the Budget

    In my previous article, I discussed what is a Homelab and why you should (or should not) have one for yourself. Now, can anyone who wants or need, have a homelab? It depends on several things but money or resources can be worked around. In this article, I will explain how I have managed to have my own Homelab without investing a fortune in it. As a matter of fact, it costed me less than US $1,000 and it works good enough to manage my home's infrastructure requirements. That being said, it is important to mention as a disclaimer: this article doesn't describe the best way to do things. It just describes how I manage to make it work even knowing there are some issues and risks with it but for now, I am fine to live with these.

  • Want Octoprint But Lack A Raspberry Pi? Use An Old Android Phone | Hackaday

    3D printers and Octoprint have a long history together, and pre-built images for the Raspberry Pi make getting up and running pretty easy. But there’s also another easy way to get in on the Octoprint action, and that’s to run it on an Android phone with the octo4a project.

  • This Raspberry Pi Mini ITX Board Has Tons Of IO | Hackaday

    The Raspberry Pi now comes in a wide variety of versions. There are tiny little Zeros, and of course the mainstream-sized boards. Then, there’s the latest greatest Compute Module 4, ready to slot on to a carrier board to break out all its IO. The Seaberry is one such design, as demonstrated by [Jeff Geerling], giving the CM4 a Mini ITX formfactor and a ton of IO. (Video embedded after the break.) The Seaberry sports a full-sized x16 PCI-E port, with only 1x bandwidth but capable of holding full-sized cards. There’s also four mini-PCI-E slots along the top, with four M.2 E-key slots hiding underneath. The board then has a M.2 slot in the middle for NVME drives, and x1 PCI-E slot hanging off the side.

  • 2021 Open Source Pay-it-Forward Pi Giveaway

    To solve both problems, I'm doing a giveaway—to enter to win one of any of the pictured items below (and maybe a few others I can find lurking in my office), just donate or say thank you to any open source project or maintainer, then submit your entry.

  • Mini-ITX Seaberry adds 11 PCIe slots to a Raspberry Pi

    But it's definitely a specialty board. People who need a low-power ARM-based development or experimentation platform could use this board like I do, to test more exotic configurations on the Pi. And it's looking like it will be the first commercially-available (though not cheapest) ways to install a Pi into a standard desktop or rackmount PC case, since it's mini ITX.

  • xa 2.3.12

    I've updated xa, André Fachat's venerable 6502 cross-assembler, to version 2.3.12. This contains a bug fix for a regression in 65816 mode which I'd meant to release earlier but got sidetracked on (thanks Samuel Falvo for the nice test case, which is also incorporated into the suite). As with prior versions it is tested on pretty much all of my Un*x-alike systems here including AIX, Mac OS X (PowerPC, Intel and Apple Silicon), NetBSD/mac68k and Linux/ppc64le. I said this before for 2.3.11 but one more time for the record: this will probably be the last in the exceptionally long-lived 2.3 series before 2.4, which as I keep warning you will definitely have some minor compatibility breaks and jettison a couple long-deprecated options and syntaxes (but will have some new features to make up for it). Again, more to come on that.